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Attentional Switching

The Experts below are selected from a list of 126 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Camille Piguet – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rumination related activity in brain networks mediating Attentional Switching in euthymic bipolar patients
    International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kallia Apazoglou, Anne-lise Küng, Paolo Cordera, Jean-michel Aubry, Alexandre Dayer, Patrik Vuilleumier, Camille Piguet

    Abstract:

    Introduction Mood disorder patients have a tendency to be more internally oriented, with difficulties in Switching Attentional focus, which might result in the generation of negative thoughts, such as rumination. The present study explored self-referential neural activity correlating with rumination tendency and Attentional Switching capacity in bipolar disorder. Methods Twenty euthymic bipolar patients and twenty matched healthy controls underwent a novel introspection task of Switching between internally and externally focused attention during a word processing task, while their brain activity was assessed using functional MRI. Results During internal focus, higher activity in self-related regions (mPFC, PCC) was found in euthymic bipolar patients as compared to controls, verifying the hypothesis of exaggerated recruitment of self-referential processes in bipolar subjects. Switching from internal to external focus revealed higher parahippocampal activity in patients as compared to controls, additionally more pronounced when Switching away from negative as compared to positive self-referential information. Furthermore, rumination traits correlated with activity in PCC, subgenual and pregenual ACC, and bilateral anterior insula during repetition of internal focus, specifically when evaluating negative words. Finally, we used ACC subregions that correlated with tendency to ruminate as seeds for a whole brain connectivity analysis. Patients showed stronger connectivity between sgACC (seed), pgACC, dPFC, and anterior insula during internal focus, whereas pgACC (seed) was more strongly connected to parahippocampal gyrus when Switching from internal to external focus. Conclusions These findings reveal an overactive rumination-related network whose activity is enhanced by negative information in euthymic bipolar patients, which could possibly contribute to impaired Switching of thoughts away from internal attention.

  • rumination related activity in brain networks mediating Attentional Switching in euthymic bipolar patients
    International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kallia Apazoglou, Anne-lise Küng, Paolo Cordera, Jean-michel Aubry, Alexandre Dayer, Patrik Vuilleumier, Camille Piguet

    Abstract:

    Mood disorder patients have a tendency to be more internally oriented, with difficulties in Switching Attentional focus, which might result in the generation of negative thoughts, such as rumination. The present study explored self-referential neural activity correlating with rumination tendency and Attentional Switching capacity in bipolar disorder. Twenty euthymic bipolar patients and twenty matched healthy controls underwent a novel introspection task of Switching between internally and externally focused attention during a word processing task, while their brain activity was assessed using functional MRI. During internal focus, higher activity in self-related regions (mPFC, PCC) was found in euthymic bipolar patients as compared to controls, verifying the hypothesis of exaggerated recruitment of self-referential processes in bipolar subjects. Switching from internal to external focus revealed higher parahippocampal activity in patients as compared to controls, additionally more pronounced when Switching away from negative as compared to positive self-referential information. Furthermore, rumination traits correlated with activity in PCC, subgenual and pregenual ACC, and bilateral anterior insula during repetition of internal focus, specifically when evaluating negative words. Finally, we used ACC subregions that correlated with tendency to ruminate as seeds for a whole brain connectivity analysis. Patients showed stronger connectivity between sgACC (seed), pgACC, dPFC, and anterior insula during internal focus, whereas pgACC (seed) was more strongly connected to parahippocampal gyrus when Switching from internal to external focus. These findings reveal an overactive rumination-related network whose activity is enhanced by negative information in euthymic bipolar patients, which could possibly contribute to impaired Switching of thoughts away from internal attention.

Kallia Apazoglou – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rumination related activity in brain networks mediating Attentional Switching in euthymic bipolar patients
    International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kallia Apazoglou, Anne-lise Küng, Paolo Cordera, Jean-michel Aubry, Alexandre Dayer, Patrik Vuilleumier, Camille Piguet

    Abstract:

    Introduction Mood disorder patients have a tendency to be more internally oriented, with difficulties in Switching Attentional focus, which might result in the generation of negative thoughts, such as rumination. The present study explored self-referential neural activity correlating with rumination tendency and Attentional Switching capacity in bipolar disorder. Methods Twenty euthymic bipolar patients and twenty matched healthy controls underwent a novel introspection task of Switching between internally and externally focused attention during a word processing task, while their brain activity was assessed using functional MRI. Results During internal focus, higher activity in self-related regions (mPFC, PCC) was found in euthymic bipolar patients as compared to controls, verifying the hypothesis of exaggerated recruitment of self-referential processes in bipolar subjects. Switching from internal to external focus revealed higher parahippocampal activity in patients as compared to controls, additionally more pronounced when Switching away from negative as compared to positive self-referential information. Furthermore, rumination traits correlated with activity in PCC, subgenual and pregenual ACC, and bilateral anterior insula during repetition of internal focus, specifically when evaluating negative words. Finally, we used ACC subregions that correlated with tendency to ruminate as seeds for a whole brain connectivity analysis. Patients showed stronger connectivity between sgACC (seed), pgACC, dPFC, and anterior insula during internal focus, whereas pgACC (seed) was more strongly connected to parahippocampal gyrus when Switching from internal to external focus. Conclusions These findings reveal an overactive rumination-related network whose activity is enhanced by negative information in euthymic bipolar patients, which could possibly contribute to impaired Switching of thoughts away from internal attention.

  • rumination related activity in brain networks mediating Attentional Switching in euthymic bipolar patients
    International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kallia Apazoglou, Anne-lise Küng, Paolo Cordera, Jean-michel Aubry, Alexandre Dayer, Patrik Vuilleumier, Camille Piguet

    Abstract:

    Mood disorder patients have a tendency to be more internally oriented, with difficulties in Switching Attentional focus, which might result in the generation of negative thoughts, such as rumination. The present study explored self-referential neural activity correlating with rumination tendency and Attentional Switching capacity in bipolar disorder. Twenty euthymic bipolar patients and twenty matched healthy controls underwent a novel introspection task of Switching between internally and externally focused attention during a word processing task, while their brain activity was assessed using functional MRI. During internal focus, higher activity in self-related regions (mPFC, PCC) was found in euthymic bipolar patients as compared to controls, verifying the hypothesis of exaggerated recruitment of self-referential processes in bipolar subjects. Switching from internal to external focus revealed higher parahippocampal activity in patients as compared to controls, additionally more pronounced when Switching away from negative as compared to positive self-referential information. Furthermore, rumination traits correlated with activity in PCC, subgenual and pregenual ACC, and bilateral anterior insula during repetition of internal focus, specifically when evaluating negative words. Finally, we used ACC subregions that correlated with tendency to ruminate as seeds for a whole brain connectivity analysis. Patients showed stronger connectivity between sgACC (seed), pgACC, dPFC, and anterior insula during internal focus, whereas pgACC (seed) was more strongly connected to parahippocampal gyrus when Switching from internal to external focus. These findings reveal an overactive rumination-related network whose activity is enhanced by negative information in euthymic bipolar patients, which could possibly contribute to impaired Switching of thoughts away from internal attention.

Ian B Hickie – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • impaired mmn p3a complex in first episode psychosis cognitive and psychosocial associations
    Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Daniel F Hermens, Philip B Ward, Antoinette Redoblado M Hodge, Manreena Kaur, Sharon L Naismith, Ian B Hickie

    Abstract:

    Abstract Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a neurophysiological indicator of the brain’s ability to extract relevant information from an irrelevant background. The P3a orienting response often accompanies MMN in deviance detection paradigms. Both MMN and P3a have been described as reliable biomarkers of schizophrenia. MMN/P3a impairments are associated with deficits in verbal memory and Attentional Switching, reflecting dysfunctions in the temporal and frontal systems, respectively. It remains unresolved whether MMN/P3a are robust biomarkers of psychosis in first-episode patients. Thirty-four young people (18 to 30 years) were assessed in this study; 17 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients were compared to 17 healthy controls. To elicit MMN/P3a, a two-tone passive auditory oddball paradigm with 8% duration deviants was used; event-related potentials were recorded at frontal, central and temporal (mastoid) sites. Neuropsychological assessments included processing speed, Attentional Switching, simple attention, and verbal learning and memory. Social functioning and quality of life measures were also obtained. The FEP group showed significantly reduced MMN amplitudes compared to controls. The FEP group also showed significantly reduced P3a amplitudes at frontal and central sites compared with controls. As expected, the FEP group also showed significant deficits in attention and verbal learning/memory. Correlational analyses found strong associations between fronto-central MMN/P3a peak amplitude and cognitive/psychosocial functioning. This study provides evidence of early neurobiological markers in young people with FEP. These findings suggest that MMN/P3a impairments are present at early stages of psychosis and that fundamental pre-attentive/deviance detection deficits may mark the beginning of progressive underlying changes with illness onset. Such deficits in FEP appear to have important links with higher-order cognitive and psychosocial functioning.

  • Impaired MMN/P3a complex in first-episode psychosis: Cognitive and psychosocial associations
    Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Daniel F Hermens, Philip B Ward, Manreena Kaur, Sharon L Naismith, M. Antoinette Redoblado Hodge, Ian B Hickie

    Abstract:

    Abstract Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a neurophysiological indicator of the brain’s ability to extract relevant information from an irrelevant background. The P3a orienting response often accompanies MMN in deviance detection paradigms. Both MMN and P3a have been described as reliable biomarkers of schizophrenia. MMN/P3a impairments are associated with deficits in verbal memory and Attentional Switching, reflecting dysfunctions in the temporal and frontal systems, respectively. It remains unresolved whether MMN/P3a are robust biomarkers of psychosis in first-episode patients. Thirty-four young people (18 to 30 years) were assessed in this study; 17 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients were compared to 17 healthy controls. To elicit MMN/P3a, a two-tone passive auditory oddball paradigm with 8% duration deviants was used; event-related potentials were recorded at frontal, central and temporal (mastoid) sites. Neuropsychological assessments included processing speed, Attentional Switching, simple attention, and verbal learning and memory. Social functioning and quality of life measures were also obtained. The FEP group showed significantly reduced MMN amplitudes compared to controls. The FEP group also showed significantly reduced P3a amplitudes at frontal and central sites compared with controls. As expected, the FEP group also showed significant deficits in attention and verbal learning/memory. Correlational analyses found strong associations between fronto-central MMN/P3a peak amplitude and cognitive/psychosocial functioning. This study provides evidence of early neurobiological markers in young people with FEP. These findings suggest that MMN/P3a impairments are present at early stages of psychosis and that fundamental pre-attentive/deviance detection deficits may mark the beginning of progressive underlying changes with illness onset. Such deficits in FEP appear to have important links with higher-order cognitive and psychosocial functioning.