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Atypical Bacteria

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1038 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Nicola Principi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Asthma in children: are chlamydia or mycoplasma involved?
    Pediatric Drugs, 2020
    Co-Authors: Susanna Esposito, Nicola Principi

    Abstract:

    Asthma aetiology is complex, involving interactions between genetic susceptibility, allergen exposure and external aggravating factors such as air pollution, smoking and respiratory tract infections. Available evidence supports a role for acute Chlaymdia pneumoniae or Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory tract infection as a trigger for 5 to 30% of wheezing episodes and asthma exacerbations. It also appears that acute infections with C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae can initiate asthma in some previously asymptomatic patients; however, the quantitative role for these Atypical Bacteria as asthma initiators is unknown at the present time. Whether chronic infections with these agents play an important role in persistent asthma symptoms and/or to asthma severity is unclear and additional information should be acquired before definite conclusions can be reached. Improvement in asthma symptoms after antimicrobial therapy active against C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae has been observed. In some studies C. pneumoniae seems to be more important for asthma pathogenesis and exacerbations than M. pneumoniae; in other reports the role of M. pneumoniae appears to be more significant. However, a number of questions remain unanswered. Carefully controlled randomised trials are clearly warranted to determine whether infection with Atypical Bacteria is really associated with asthma and to define the appropriate role of antimicrobial treatment. LEADING ARTICLE

  • role of Atypical Bacteria in children undergoing tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent acute tonsillopharyngitis
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2008
    Co-Authors: Susanna Esposito, Francesco Blasi, Paola Marchisio, Pasquale Capaccio, M Bellasio, F Corti, E Dusi, Lorenzo Pignataro, Nicola Principi

    Abstract:

    The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of Atypical Bacterial infections in children undergoing tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent acute tonsillopharyngitis (AT) and the possible benefit of surgery in cases in which Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae seem to play a role in causing the recurrences. A total of 118 patients (76 males; mean age ± standard deviation, 6.67 ± 3.31 years) were enrolled: 59 underwent tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent AT and 59 underwent adenotonsillectomy because of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The results show, for the first time, that the great majority of children with a history of severely recurrent AT (and, therefore, considered to be eligible for elective tonsillectomy) are infected by Atypical Bacteria, mainly M. pneumoniae, and that tonsillectomy seems to be effective in reducing the recurrence of both AT and acute respiratory disease during 12 months follow-up postsurgery.

  • role of Atypical Bacteria and azithromycin therapy for children with recurrent respiratory tract infections
    Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 2005
    Co-Authors: Susanna Esposito, Francesco Blasi, Samantha Bosis, R Droghetti, N Faelli, E Begliatti, Elena Tremolati, Alessandro Porta, Nicola Principi

    Abstract:

    Background:The aim of this study of 352 patients, 1–14 years of age, with acute respiratory infections and a history of recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs), and 208 healthy subjects was to evaluate whether Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae played a role in causing acute respi

Susanna Esposito – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Asthma in children: are chlamydia or mycoplasma involved?
    Pediatric Drugs, 2020
    Co-Authors: Susanna Esposito, Nicola Principi

    Abstract:

    Asthma aetiology is complex, involving interactions between genetic susceptibility, allergen exposure and external aggravating factors such as air pollution, smoking and respiratory tract infections. Available evidence supports a role for acute Chlaymdia pneumoniae or Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory tract infection as a trigger for 5 to 30% of wheezing episodes and asthma exacerbations. It also appears that acute infections with C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae can initiate asthma in some previously asymptomatic patients; however, the quantitative role for these Atypical Bacteria as asthma initiators is unknown at the present time. Whether chronic infections with these agents play an important role in persistent asthma symptoms and/or to asthma severity is unclear and additional information should be acquired before definite conclusions can be reached. Improvement in asthma symptoms after antimicrobial therapy active against C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae has been observed. In some studies C. pneumoniae seems to be more important for asthma pathogenesis and exacerbations than M. pneumoniae; in other reports the role of M. pneumoniae appears to be more significant. However, a number of questions remain unanswered. Carefully controlled randomised trials are clearly warranted to determine whether infection with Atypical Bacteria is really associated with asthma and to define the appropriate role of antimicrobial treatment. LEADING ARTICLE

  • role of Atypical Bacteria in children undergoing tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent acute tonsillopharyngitis
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2008
    Co-Authors: Susanna Esposito, Francesco Blasi, Paola Marchisio, Pasquale Capaccio, M Bellasio, F Corti, E Dusi, Lorenzo Pignataro, Nicola Principi

    Abstract:

    The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of Atypical Bacterial infections in children undergoing tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent acute tonsillopharyngitis (AT) and the possible benefit of surgery in cases in which Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae seem to play a role in causing the recurrences. A total of 118 patients (76 males; mean age ± standard deviation, 6.67 ± 3.31 years) were enrolled: 59 underwent tonsillectomy because of severely recurrent AT and 59 underwent adenotonsillectomy because of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The results show, for the first time, that the great majority of children with a history of severely recurrent AT (and, therefore, considered to be eligible for elective tonsillectomy) are infected by Atypical Bacteria, mainly M. pneumoniae, and that tonsillectomy seems to be effective in reducing the recurrence of both AT and acute respiratory disease during 12 months follow-up postsurgery.

  • detection of respiratory viruses and Atypical Bacteria in children s tonsils and adenoids
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Lorenzo Drago, Francesco Blasi, Susanna Esposito, Paola Marchisio, Pasquale Capaccio, Elena De Vecchi, Elena Baggi, Lorenzo Pignataro

    Abstract:

    The tonsils and adenoids of 44 children were analyzed for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Viruses were detected in 47.7% of the children and 37.3% of the specimens, with adenovirus and parainfluenza viruses being the most frequently detected microorganisms.

Christian Drosten – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • spectrum of viruses and Atypical Bacteria in intercontinental air travelers with symptoms of acute respiratory infection
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2007
    Co-Authors: Luciano Kleber De Souza Luna, Marcus Panning, Klaus Grywna, Susanne Pfefferle, Christian Drosten

    Abstract:

    : Respiratory infections after air travel are frequent, but epidemiological data are incomplete. Using sensitive polymerase chain reactions, we studied the spectrum of Atypical Bacteria and respiratory viruses in travelers fulfilling the case definition of severe acute respiratory syndrome. A pathogen was identified in 67 travelers (43.2%). Influenza and parainfluenza viruses were most prevalent, at 14.2% and 15.5%, respectively. Prevalences of adenoviruses, human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses, and rhinoviruses ranged between 2.6% and 4.8%. Human bocavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Legionella, Mycoplasma, and Chlamydophila species were absent or appeared at frequencies of <1%. To our knowledge, these are the first specific baseline data for the mentioned agents in the context of air travel.

  • Spectrum of Viruses and Atypical Bacteria in Intercontinental Air Travelers with Symptoms of Acute Respiratory Infection
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2007
    Co-Authors: Luciano Kleber De Souza Luna, Marcus Panning, Klaus Grywna, Susanne Pfefferle, Christian Drosten

    Abstract:

    : Respiratory infections after air travel are frequent, but epidemiological data are incomplete. Using sensitive polymerase chain reactions, we studied the spectrum of Atypical Bacteria and respiratory viruses in travelers fulfilling the case definition of severe acute respiratory syndrome. A pathogen was identified in 67 travelers (43.2%). Influenza and parainfluenza viruses were most prevalent, at 14.2% and 15.5%, respectively. Prevalences of adenoviruses, human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses, and rhinoviruses ranged between 2.6% and 4.8%. Human bocavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Legionella, Mycoplasma, and Chlamydophila species were absent or appeared at frequencies of