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Auditory Ossicle

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Kun Lv – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a novel Auditory Ossicles membrane and the development of conductive hearing loss in dmp1 null mice
    Bone, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kun Lv, Haiyang Huang, Xing Yi, Mark E Chertoff, Chaoyuan Li, Baozhi Yuan, Robert J Hinton, Jian Q Feng

    Abstract:

    Abstract Genetic mouse models are widely used for understanding human diseases but we know much less about the anatomical structure of the Auditory Ossicles in the mouse than we do about human Ossicles. Furthermore, current studies have mainly focused on disease conditions such as osteomalacia and rickets in patients with hypophosphatemia rickets, although the reason that these patients develop late-onset hearing loss is unknown. In this study, we first analyzed Dmp1 lac Z knock-in Auditory Ossicles (in which the blue reporter is used to trace DMP1 expression in osteocytes) using X-gal staining and discovered a novel bony membrane surrounding the mouse malleus. This finding was further confirmed by 3-D micro-CT, X-ray, and alizarin red stained images. We speculate that this unique structure amplifies and facilitates sound wave transmissions in two ways: increasing the contact surface between the eardrum and malleus and accelerating the sound transmission due to its mineral content. Next, we documented a progressive deterioration in the Dmp1 -null Auditory Ossicle structures using multiple imaging techniques. The Auditory brainstem response test demonstrated a conductive hearing loss in the adult Dmp1 -null mice. This finding may help to explain in part why patients with DMP1 mutations develop late-onset hearing loss, and supports the critical role of DMP1 in maintaining the integrity of the Auditory Ossicles and its bony membrane.

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Jian Q Feng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a novel Auditory Ossicles membrane and the development of conductive hearing loss in dmp1 null mice
    Bone, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kun Lv, Haiyang Huang, Xing Yi, Mark E Chertoff, Chaoyuan Li, Baozhi Yuan, Robert J Hinton, Jian Q Feng

    Abstract:

    Abstract Genetic mouse models are widely used for understanding human diseases but we know much less about the anatomical structure of the Auditory Ossicles in the mouse than we do about human Ossicles. Furthermore, current studies have mainly focused on disease conditions such as osteomalacia and rickets in patients with hypophosphatemia rickets, although the reason that these patients develop late-onset hearing loss is unknown. In this study, we first analyzed Dmp1 lac Z knock-in Auditory Ossicles (in which the blue reporter is used to trace DMP1 expression in osteocytes) using X-gal staining and discovered a novel bony membrane surrounding the mouse malleus. This finding was further confirmed by 3-D micro-CT, X-ray, and alizarin red stained images. We speculate that this unique structure amplifies and facilitates sound wave transmissions in two ways: increasing the contact surface between the eardrum and malleus and accelerating the sound transmission due to its mineral content. Next, we documented a progressive deterioration in the Dmp1 -null Auditory Ossicle structures using multiple imaging techniques. The Auditory brainstem response test demonstrated a conductive hearing loss in the adult Dmp1 -null mice. This finding may help to explain in part why patients with DMP1 mutations develop late-onset hearing loss, and supports the critical role of DMP1 in maintaining the integrity of the Auditory Ossicles and its bony membrane.

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Katsuichiro Ohsaki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Histological reaction of Auditory bulla bone to synthetic Auditory Ossicle (Apaceram) in rats.
    The journal of medical investigation : JMI, 2000
    Co-Authors: Y H Tran, Katsuichiro Ohsaki, M Yokozeki, K Moriyama

    Abstract:

    To investigate the biocompatibility of a synthetic Auditory Ossicle to host bone, small thin Apaceram disks composed of dense hydroxyapatite were implanted under the periosteum of the left Auditory bulla in 32 rats for periods ranging from 1 day to 270 days. A sham operation performed on 10 rats served as a control. Decalcified histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were observed using light microscopy. The experiment showed: 1) a time-dependent mature fibrous connective tissue surrounding the Apaceram disk, 2) no evidence of inflammatory reaction caused by the implant from 90 days after implantation until the end of the experiment, 3) no evidence of osteolysis by osteoclasts caused by the implant, and 4) direct contact of bone to the implant on the bone-disk interface at 180 and 270 days after implantation. The findings suggest that Apaceram has a high degree of implant biocompatibility, making it a satisfactory substitute biomaterial for otological reconstructive surgeries.

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  • long term observation of subcutaneous tissue reaction to synthetic Auditory Ossicle bioceram in rats
    The Journal of Medical Investigation, 1999
    Co-Authors: Chun-sheng Zhu, Katsuichiro Ohsaki, Yen Hai Tran, Yasuo Ohba, Keiji Moriyama

    Abstract:

    To evaluate biocompatibility to tissue in long-term implantation, Bioceram® discs made of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) were implanted subcutaneously within the interscapular region of 64 rats for six to 20 months. Histological sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and the surface of the implant material were observed using light micros-copy. Different cell types and the thickness of fibrous capsules surrounding the implants were examined quantitatively by light microscopy. Small numbers of macrophages (2.8±0.7%) and lymphocytes (2.7±0.9%) were observed at six months after implantation, gradually decreasing to zero at 16, 18 and 20 months. Neither neutrophils nor foreign body giant cells were seen in any specimens. The thickness of fibrous capsules surrounding the implants was closely related to the shape of the implant, but there was no significant change between six and 20 months after implantation. No change in Bioceram® surfaces were observed under stereoscopic microscopy from six to20months after implantation. The study results indicate that Bioceram® is a satisfactory biocompatible material for reconstructive surgery from the viewpoint of long-term tissue response. Present results of experiments with Bioceram® are also compared to previous results with Apaceram® and different tissue responses of the two materials are discussed.

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  • Subcutaneous inflammatory reaction to a synthetic Auditory Ossicle (Bioceram) in rats.
    Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 1999
    Co-Authors: Katsuichiro Ohsaki, Kunio, Chun-sheng Zhu, Yasuhiko Yamashita, Satoru Tenshin, Teruko Takano-yamamoto

    Abstract:

    Cellular response and inflammatory reaction to synthetic Auditory Ossicle (Bioceram®) made from aluminium oxide are investigated. Local inflammatory effects are important in wound healing and in determining biocompatibility of an implant, necessitating the study of biologic effects of implants, especially inflammation and fibrous capsule formation. Bioceram® discs were implanted subcutaneously in the interscapular region of rats for various periods of time, ranging from 1 day to 300 days. Histological sections 6

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