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Auricle

The Experts below are selected from a list of 294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Roland D Eavey – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • in vitro tissue engineering to generate a human sized Auricle and nasal tip
    Laryngoscope, 2003
    Co-Authors: Syed H Kamil, Roland D Eavey, Koji Kojima, Martin P Vacanti, Lawrence J Bonassar, Charles A Vacanti

    Abstract:

    Objectives/Hypothesis Tissue engineering has successfully generated cartilage in a xenograft and an autograft model. However, challenges remain with both of these in vivo techniques before clinical application can be realized. We hypothesized that a human-sized cartilaginous structure could be generated completely in vitro as a complementary or an alternative technique.

    Methods Scaffolds were created in the shape of five full-sized human Auricles and five nasal tip cartilaginous skeletons. Bovine shoulder chondrocytes at a concentration of 50 million cells/mL were seeded onto the scaffolds and were grown for 12 weeks in vitro. Two of the auricular scaffolds had internal support provided by soft acrylic sheets and were later implanted into nude rats.

    Results All of the scaffolds maintained shape and size through 12 weeks of in vitro culture. On gross examination the scaffolds were progressively replaced by cartilage, which was confirmed by histological and biochemical analysis. The auricular scaffolds with the acrylic internal support had the most natural rigidity, which was observed by gentle palpation. The nasal scaffolds maintained excellent definition even without internal support.

    Conclusion An adult human-sized Auricle and nasal tip cartilaginous structure can be grown entirely in vitro using principles of tissue engineering.

Charles A Vacanti – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • in vitro tissue engineering to generate a human sized Auricle and nasal tip
    Laryngoscope, 2003
    Co-Authors: Syed H Kamil, Roland D Eavey, Koji Kojima, Martin P Vacanti, Lawrence J Bonassar, Charles A Vacanti

    Abstract:

    Objectives/Hypothesis Tissue engineering has successfully generated cartilage in a xenograft and an autograft model. However, challenges remain with both of these in vivo techniques before clinical application can be realized. We hypothesized that a human-sized cartilaginous structure could be generated completely in vitro as a complementary or an alternative technique.

    Methods Scaffolds were created in the shape of five full-sized human Auricles and five nasal tip cartilaginous skeletons. Bovine shoulder chondrocytes at a concentration of 50 million cells/mL were seeded onto the scaffolds and were grown for 12 weeks in vitro. Two of the auricular scaffolds had internal support provided by soft acrylic sheets and were later implanted into nude rats.

    Results All of the scaffolds maintained shape and size through 12 weeks of in vitro culture. On gross examination the scaffolds were progressively replaced by cartilage, which was confirmed by histological and biochemical analysis. The auricular scaffolds with the acrylic internal support had the most natural rigidity, which was observed by gentle palpation. The nasal scaffolds maintained excellent definition even without internal support.

    Conclusion An adult human-sized Auricle and nasal tip cartilaginous structure can be grown entirely in vitro using principles of tissue engineering.

  • transplantation of chondrocytes utilizing a polymer cell construct to produce tissue engineered cartilage in the shape of a human ear
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1997
    Co-Authors: Joseph P Vacanti, Keith T Paige, Joseph Upton, Charles A Vacanti

    Abstract:

    This study evaluates the feasibility of growing tissue-engineered cartilage in the shape of a human ear using chondrocytes seeded onto a synthetic biodegradable polymer fashioned in the shape of a 3-year-old child’s Auricle. A polymer template was formed in the shape of a human Auricle using a nonwo

Katharina Storck – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • prefabrication of 3d cartilage contructs towards a tissue engineered Auricle a model tested in rabbits
    PLOS ONE, 2013
    Co-Authors: Achim Von Bomhard, Johannes A Veit, Christian Bermueller, Nicole Rotter, R Staudenmaier, Katharina Storck

    Abstract:

    The reconstruction of an Auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE) three-dimensional (3D) cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D) cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human Auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15×8 cm) and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The Auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps and the implanted cultivated constructs were well neovascularized. The presented method is suggested as a promising alternative towards clinical application of engineered cartilaginous tissue for plastic and reconstructive surgery.