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Azo Dye

The Experts below are selected from a list of 39294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Xingwang Zhang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Azo Dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system
    Bioresource Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zhongjian Li, Xingwang Zhang

    Abstract:

    Abstract A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic–aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for Azo Dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and Azo Dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic–anaerobic Azo Dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease Azo Dye removal. Moreover, UV–vis spectra and GC–MS illustrated that the Azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode–cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous Azo Dye degradation.

  • Bioresource Technology Azo Dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic – aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system
    Bioresour Technol, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zhongjian Li, Xingwang Zhang, Jun Lin, Song Han, Lecheng Lei

    Abstract:

    A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for Azo Dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and Azo Dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic-anaerobic Azo Dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease Azo Dye removal. Moreover, UV-vis spectra and GC-MS illustrated that the Azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode-cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous Azo Dye degradation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Zhongjian Li – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Azo Dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system
    Bioresource Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zhongjian Li, Xingwang Zhang

    Abstract:

    Abstract A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic–aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for Azo Dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and Azo Dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic–anaerobic Azo Dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease Azo Dye removal. Moreover, UV–vis spectra and GC–MS illustrated that the Azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode–cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous Azo Dye degradation.

  • Bioresource Technology Azo Dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic – aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system
    Bioresour Technol, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zhongjian Li, Xingwang Zhang, Jun Lin, Song Han, Lecheng Lei

    Abstract:

    A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for Azo Dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and Azo Dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic-anaerobic Azo Dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease Azo Dye removal. Moreover, UV-vis spectra and GC-MS illustrated that the Azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode-cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous Azo Dye degradation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Jim A Field – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Azo Dye decolourisation by anaerobic granular sludge
    Chemosphere, 2001
    Co-Authors: G Lettinga, Jim A Field

    Abstract:

    The decolourisation of 20 selected Azo Dyes by granular sludge from an upward-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor was assayed. Complete reduction was found for all Azo Dyes tested, generally yielding colourless products. The reactions followed first-order kinetics and reaction rates varied greatly between Dyes: half-life times ranged from 1 to about 100 h. The slowest reaction rates were found for reactive Dyes with a triazine reactive group. There was no correlation between a Dye‘s half-life time and its molecular weight, indicating that cell penetration was probably not an important factor. Since granular sludge contains sulphide, eight Dyes were also monitored for direct chemical decolourisation by sulphide. All these Dyes were reduced chemically albeit at slower rates than in the presence of sludge at comparable sulphide levels. Increasing sulphide concentrations, even when present in huge excess, stimulated the Azo reduction rate. The results indicate that granular sludge can decolourise a broad spectrum of Azo Dye structures due to non-specific extracellular reactions. Reducing agents (e.g., sulphide) in sludge play an important role. The presence of anaerobic biomass is probably beneficial for maintaining the pools of these reduced compounds.

  • reduction of the Azo Dye mordant orange 1 by methanogenic granular sludge exposed to oxygen
    Bioresource Technology, 1999
    Co-Authors: G Lettinga, Jim A Field

    Abstract:

    Integration of anaerobic and aerobic conditions in a single bioreactor is a good strategy for the complete mineralization of Azo Dyes. In order for this strategy to work, Azo Dye reduction should occur in biofilms exposed to oxygen. Therefore, the effect of oxygen on the Azo Dye reduction by methanogenic granular sludge was studied using Mordant Orange 1 (MO1) as a model. Azo Dye-reduction rates by two different granular sludges were determined in batch assays with various concentrations of oxygen in the headspace. Azo Dye reduction occurred in the presence of oxygen if co-substrates, either ethanol or acetate, were added. The rate of Dye reduction was highly positively correlated with the oxygen-consuming activity of the sludge. The results suggest that co-substrates stimulate oxygen respiration, which lowers oxygen penetration into the biofilm and thereby creates anaerobic microniches where Azo Dye reduction can occur.

  • detoxification and partial mineralization of the Azo Dye mordant orange 1 in a continuous upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor
    Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Brian Donlon, G Lettinga, Elias Razoflores, Maurice L G C Luijten, H J Swarts, Jim A Field

    Abstract:

    In batch toxicity assays, Azo Dye compounds were found to be many times more toxic than their cleavage products (aromatic amines) towards methanogenic activity in anaerobic granular sludge. Considering the ability of anaerobic microorganisms to reduce Azo groups, detoxification of Azo compounds towards methanogens can be expected to occur during anaerobic wastewater treatment. In order to test this hypothesis, the anaerobic degradation of one Azo Dye compound, Mordant orange 1 (MO1), by granular sludge was investigated in three separate continuous upflow anaerobic sludge-blanket reactors. One reactor, receiving no cosubstrate, failed after 50 days presumably because of a lack of reducing equivalents. However, the two reactors receiving either glucose or a volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate) mixture, could eliminate the Dye during operation for 217 days. The Azo Dye was reductively cleaved to less toxic aromatic amines (1,4-phenylenediamine and 5-aminosalicylic acid) making the treatment of MO1 feasible at influent concentrations that were over 25 times higher than their 50% inhibitory concentrations. In the reactor receiving glucose as cosubstrate, 5-aminosalicylic acid could only be detected at trace levels in the effluent after day 189 of operation. Batch biodegradability assays with the sludge sampled from this reactor confirmed the mineralization of 5-aminosalicylic acid to methane.