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Azospirillum

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Vincent Walker – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • comparison of prominent Azospirillum strains in Azospirillum pseudomonas glomus consortia for promotion of maize growth
    Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Olivier Couillerot, Augusto Ramireztrujillo, Vincent Walker, Andreas Von Felten, Jan Jansa, M Maurhofer, Genevieve Defago, Claire Prigentcombaret

    Abstract:

    Azospirillum are prominent plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) extensively used as phytostimulatory crop inoculants, but only few studies are dealing with Azospirillum-containing mixed inocula involving more than two microorganisms. We compared here three prominent Azospirillum strains as part of three-component consortia including also the PGPR Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 and a mycorrhizal inoculant mix composed of three Glomus strains. Inoculant colonization of maize was assessed by quantitative PCR, transcription of auxin synthesis gene ipdC (involved in phytostimulation) in Azospirillum by RT-PCR, and effects on maize by secondary metabolic profiling and shoot biomass measurements. Results showed that phytostimulation by all the three-component consortia was comparable, despite contrasted survival of the Azospirillum strains and different secondary metabolic responses of maize to inoculation. Unexpectedly, the presence of Azospirillum in the inoculum resulted in lower phytostimulation in comparison with the Pseudomonas–Glomus two-component consortium, but this effect was transient. Azospirillum‘s ipdC gene was transcribed in all treatments, especially with three-component consortia, but not with all plants and samplings. Inoculation had no negative impact on the prevalence of mycorrhizal taxa in roots. In conclusion, this study brought new insights in the functioning of microbial consortia and showed that Azospirillum–Pseudomonas–Glomus three-component inoculants may be useful in environmental biotechnology for maize growth promotion.

  • host plant secondary metabolite profiling shows a complex strain dependent response of maize to plant growth promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Azospirillum
    New Phytologist, 2011
    Co-Authors: René Bally, Floriant Bellvert, Cedric Bertrand, Vincent Walker, Yvan Moenneloccoz, Gilles Comte

    Abstract:

    Summary
    •Most Azospirillum plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) benefit plant growth through source effects related to free nitrogen fixation and/or phytohormone production, but little is known about their potential effects on plant physiology. These effects were assessed by comparing the early impacts of three Azospirillum inoculant strains on secondary metabolite profiles of two different maize (Zea mays) cultivars.
    •After 10 d of growth in nonsterile soil, maize methanolic extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and secondary metabolites identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
    •Seed inoculation resulted in increased shoot biomass (and also root biomass with one strain) of hybrid PR37Y15 but had no stimulatory effect on hybrid DK315. In parallel, Azospirillum inoculation led to major qualitative and quantitative modifications of the contents of secondary metabolites, especially benzoxazinoids, in the maize plants. These modifications depended on the PGPR strain × plant cultivar combination.
    •Thus, Azospirillum inoculation resulted in early, strain-dependent modifications in the biosynthetic pathways of benzoxazine derivatives in maize in compatible interactions. This is the first study documenting a PGPR effect on plant secondary metabolite profiles, and suggests the establishment of complex interactions between Azospirillum PGPR and maize.

Gilles Comte – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • plant secondary metabolite profiling evidences strain dependent effect in the Azospirillum oryza sativa association
    Phytochemistry, 2013
    Co-Authors: Amel Chamam, Herve Sanguin, Floriant Bellvert, Guillaume Meiffren, Gilles Comte, Florence Wisniewskidye, Cedric Bertrand, Claire Prigentcombaret

    Abstract:

    Abstract Azospirillum is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) able to enhance growth and yield of cereals such as rice, maize and wheat. The growth-promoting ability of some Azospirillum strains appears to be highly specific to certain plant species and cultivars. In order to ascertain the specificity of the associative symbiosis between rice and Azospirillum, the physiological response of two rice cultivars, Nipponbare and Cigalon, inoculated with two rice-associated Azospirillum was analyzed at two levels: plant growth response and plant secondary metabolic response. Each strain of Azospirillum (Azospirillum lipoferum 4B isolated from Cigalon and Azospirillum sp. B510 isolated from Nipponbare) preferentially increased growth of the cultivar from which it was isolated. This specific effect is not related to a defect in colonization of host cultivar as each strain colonizes effectively both rice cultivars, either at the rhizoplane (for 4B and B510) and inside the roots (for B510). The metabolic profiling approach showed that, in response to PGPR inoculation, profiles of rice secondary metabolites were modified, with phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives being the main metabolites affected. Moreover, plant metabolic changes differed according to Azospirillum strain × cultivar combinations; indeed, 4B induced major secondary metabolic profile modifications only on Cigalon roots, while B510, probably due to its endophytic feature, induced metabolic variations on shoots and roots of both cultivars, triggering a systemic response. Plant secondary metabolite profiling thereby evidences the specific interaction between an Azospirillum strain and its original host cultivar.

  • host plant secondary metabolite profiling shows a complex strain dependent response of maize to plant growth promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Azospirillum
    New Phytologist, 2011
    Co-Authors: René Bally, Floriant Bellvert, Cedric Bertrand, Vincent Walker, Yvan Moenneloccoz, Gilles Comte

    Abstract:

    Summary
    •Most Azospirillum plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) benefit plant growth through source effects related to free nitrogen fixation and/or phytohormone production, but little is known about their potential effects on plant physiology. These effects were assessed by comparing the early impacts of three Azospirillum inoculant strains on secondary metabolite profiles of two different maize (Zea mays) cultivars.
    •After 10 d of growth in nonsterile soil, maize methanolic extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and secondary metabolites identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
    •Seed inoculation resulted in increased shoot biomass (and also root biomass with one strain) of hybrid PR37Y15 but had no stimulatory effect on hybrid DK315. In parallel, Azospirillum inoculation led to major qualitative and quantitative modifications of the contents of secondary metabolites, especially benzoxazinoids, in the maize plants. These modifications depended on the PGPR strain × plant cultivar combination.
    •Thus, Azospirillum inoculation resulted in early, strain-dependent modifications in the biosynthetic pathways of benzoxazine derivatives in maize in compatible interactions. This is the first study documenting a PGPR effect on plant secondary metabolite profiles, and suggests the establishment of complex interactions between Azospirillum PGPR and maize.

Floriant Bellvert – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • plant secondary metabolite profiling evidences strain dependent effect in the Azospirillum oryza sativa association
    Phytochemistry, 2013
    Co-Authors: Amel Chamam, Herve Sanguin, Floriant Bellvert, Guillaume Meiffren, Gilles Comte, Florence Wisniewskidye, Cedric Bertrand, Claire Prigentcombaret

    Abstract:

    Abstract Azospirillum is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) able to enhance growth and yield of cereals such as rice, maize and wheat. The growth-promoting ability of some Azospirillum strains appears to be highly specific to certain plant species and cultivars. In order to ascertain the specificity of the associative symbiosis between rice and Azospirillum, the physiological response of two rice cultivars, Nipponbare and Cigalon, inoculated with two rice-associated Azospirillum was analyzed at two levels: plant growth response and plant secondary metabolic response. Each strain of Azospirillum (Azospirillum lipoferum 4B isolated from Cigalon and Azospirillum sp. B510 isolated from Nipponbare) preferentially increased growth of the cultivar from which it was isolated. This specific effect is not related to a defect in colonization of host cultivar as each strain colonizes effectively both rice cultivars, either at the rhizoplane (for 4B and B510) and inside the roots (for B510). The metabolic profiling approach showed that, in response to PGPR inoculation, profiles of rice secondary metabolites were modified, with phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives being the main metabolites affected. Moreover, plant metabolic changes differed according to Azospirillum strain × cultivar combinations; indeed, 4B induced major secondary metabolic profile modifications only on Cigalon roots, while B510, probably due to its endophytic feature, induced metabolic variations on shoots and roots of both cultivars, triggering a systemic response. Plant secondary metabolite profiling thereby evidences the specific interaction between an Azospirillum strain and its original host cultivar.

  • host plant secondary metabolite profiling shows a complex strain dependent response of maize to plant growth promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Azospirillum
    New Phytologist, 2011
    Co-Authors: René Bally, Floriant Bellvert, Cedric Bertrand, Vincent Walker, Yvan Moenneloccoz, Gilles Comte

    Abstract:

    Summary
    •Most Azospirillum plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) benefit plant growth through source effects related to free nitrogen fixation and/or phytohormone production, but little is known about their potential effects on plant physiology. These effects were assessed by comparing the early impacts of three Azospirillum inoculant strains on secondary metabolite profiles of two different maize (Zea mays) cultivars.
    •After 10 d of growth in nonsterile soil, maize methanolic extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and secondary metabolites identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
    •Seed inoculation resulted in increased shoot biomass (and also root biomass with one strain) of hybrid PR37Y15 but had no stimulatory effect on hybrid DK315. In parallel, Azospirillum inoculation led to major qualitative and quantitative modifications of the contents of secondary metabolites, especially benzoxazinoids, in the maize plants. These modifications depended on the PGPR strain × plant cultivar combination.
    •Thus, Azospirillum inoculation resulted in early, strain-dependent modifications in the biosynthetic pathways of benzoxazine derivatives in maize in compatible interactions. This is the first study documenting a PGPR effect on plant secondary metabolite profiles, and suggests the establishment of complex interactions between Azospirillum PGPR and maize.