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Bagasse

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Kelly Hofsetz – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • brazilian sugarcane Bagasse energy and non energy consumption
    Biomass & Bioenergy, 2012
    Co-Authors: Kelly Hofsetz, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Pereira Da Silva

    Abstract:

    Abstract Sugarcane is an important crop for economic development of Brazil, once it represents an ethanol and sugar source, as well as the biomass residue (Bagasse) that is used for electric energy production. Due to its increasing potential uses, sugarcane Bagasse was analyzed for energy & non-energy consumption in this work. For that, the amount of Bagasse used for this purpose since 1999/2000 to 2012/2013 seasons was discussed as well as the energy from sugarcane Bagasse commercialized on energy auctions in Brazil. Additionally, an estimative of Bagasse quantity to be used for electric energy and for second-generation ethanol for 2015 and 2030 was shown. The volume of sugarcane Bagasse production has increased year by year, and it is possible to observe that there is an increase amount of available Bagasse being used for power generation (energy consumption), in cogeneration arrangements. The Brazilian Energy Plan scenarios estimate a mass sugarcane Bagasse offering to be used only for second-generation ethanol around 7.0 × 10 6  tonnes year −1 for 2015, and 25.9 × 10 6  tonnes year −1 for 2030. Apart from the Bagasse that provides all energy required by sugarcane process, mills can generate an energy surplus and sell it to the grid. Power generation from sugarcane Bagasse has been made possible through financing by the Brazilian Program of Incentives for Alternative Sources of Electrical Power (PROINFA) which is a renewable energy and can be commercialized through energy auctions.

  • Brazilian sugarcane Bagasse: Energy and non-energy consumption
    Biomass and Bioenergy, 2012
    Co-Authors: Kelly Hofsetz, Maria Aparecida Silva

    Abstract:

    Sugarcane is an important crop for economic development of Brazil, once it represents an ethanol and sugar source, as well as the biomass residue (Bagasse) that is used for electric energy production. Due to its increasing potential uses, sugarcane Bagasse was analyzed for energy & non-energy consumption in this work. For that, the amount of Bagasse used for this purpose since 1999/2000 to 2012/2013 seasons was discussed as well as the energy from sugarcane Bagasse commercialized on energy auctions in Brazil. Additionally, an estimative of Bagasse quantity to be used for electric energy and for second-generation ethanol for 2015 and 2030 was shown. The volume of sugarcane Bagasse production has increased year by year, and it is possible to observe that there is an increase amount of available Bagasse being used for power generation (energy consumption), in cogeneration arrangements. The Brazilian Energy Plan scenarios estimate a mass sugarcane Bagasse offering to be used only for second-generation ethanol around 7.0 × 106tonnes year-1for 2015, and 25.9 × 106tonnes year-1for 2030. Apart from the Bagasse that provides all energy required by sugarcane process, mills can generate an energy surplus and sell it to the grid. Power generation from sugarcane Bagasse has been made possible through financing by the Brazilian Program of Incentives for Alternative Sources of Electrical Power (PROINFA) which is a renewable energy and can be commercialized through energy auctions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

S. C. Rabelo – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • production of bioethanol methane and heat from sugarcane Bagasse in a biorefinery concept
    Bioresource Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: S. C. Rabelo, Hélène Carrère, Maciel R Filho, Aline Carvalho Da Costa

    Abstract:

    The potential of biogas production from the residues of second generation bioethanol production was investigated taking into consideration two types of pretreatment: lime or alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Bagasse was pretreated, enzymatically hydrolyzed and the wastes from pretreatment and hydrolysis were used to produce biogas. Results have shown that if pretreatment is carried out at a Bagasse concentration of 4% DM, the highest global methane production is obtained with the peroxide pretreatment: 72.1 L methane/kg Bagasse. The recovery of lignin from the peroxide pretreatment liquor was also the highest, 112.7 ± 0.01 g/kg of Bagasse. Evaluation of four different biofuel production scenarios has shown that 63–65% of the energy that would be produced by Bagasse incineration can be recovered by combining ethanol production with the combustion of lignin and hydrolysis residues, along with the anaerobic digestion of pretreatment liquors, while only 32–33% of the energy is recovered by bioethanol production alone.

  • Production of bioethanol, methane and heat from sugarcane Bagasse in a biorefinery concept
    Bioresource Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: S. C. Rabelo, Hélène Carrère, Rubens Maciel Filho, A.c. Costa

    Abstract:

    The potential of biogas production from the residues of second generation bioethanol production was investigated taking into consideration two types of pretreatment: lime or alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Bagasse was pretreated, enzymatically hydrolyzed and the wastes from pretreatment and hydrolysis were used to produce biogas. Results have shown that if pretreatment is carried out at a Bagasse concentration of 4% DM, the highest global methane production is obtained with the peroxide pretreatment: 72.1. L. methane/kg. Bagasse. The recovery of lignin from the peroxide pretreatment liquor was also the highest, 112.7 ± 0.01 g/kg of Bagasse. Evaluation of four different biofuel production scenarios has shown that 63-65% of the energy that would be produced by Bagasse incineration can be recovered by combining ethanol production with the combustion of lignin and hydrolysis residues, along with the anaerobic digestion of pretreatment liquors, while only 32-33% of the energy is recovered by bioethanol production alone. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • lime pretreatment of sugarcane Bagasse for bioethanol production
    Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: S. C. Rabelo, Rubens Maciel Filho, Aline Carvalho Da Costa

    Abstract:

    The pretreatment of sugarcane Bagasse with lime (calcium hydroxide) is evaluated. The effect of lime pretreatment on digestibility was studied through analyses using central composite design (response surface), considering pretreatment time, temperature, and lime loading as factors. The responses evaluated were the yield of glucose from pretreated Bagasse after enzymatic hydrolysis. Experiments were performed using the Bagasse as it comes from an alcohol/sugar factory (non-screened Bagasse) and Bagasse in the size range from 0.248 to 1.397 mm (screened Bagasse) (12-60 mesh). It was observed that the particle size presented influence in the release of fermentable sugars after enzymatic hydrolysis using low loading of cellulase and β-glucosidase (3.5 FPU/g dry pretreated biomass and 1.0 IU/g dry pretreated biomass, respectively).

A. Bahurudeen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Development of Sustainable Alkali Activated Binder for Construction Using Sugarcane Bagasse Ash and Marble Waste
    Sugar Tech, 2020
    Co-Authors: T. Murugesan, R. Vidjeapriya, A. Bahurudeen

    Abstract:

    The rapid growth in the construction sector leads to high demand for construction materials and hence global research studies focus on the use of sustainable alternative materials to meet the demand. Sugarcane Bagasse ash is a by-product from sugar industry and about 44,220 tonnes/day is disposed of as waste in India. Bagasse ash consists of reactive silica and can be used as a sustainable source material in alkali activated binder instead of disposed as a waste. Similarly, marble waste from marble processing plants can be used as an alternative for fine aggregates. Alkali-activated concrete has high strength and durability compared to conventional cement concrete. Bagasse ash can be blended with other industrial by-products like slag to produce high quality of alkali-activated concrete without cement. The combined effect of Bagasse ash and marble waste in alkali-activated mortar is not yet investigated. This present study focuses on the performance of Bagasse ash and marble waste as a precursor and fine aggregates respectively in alkali-activated mortar. Influence of three different molarities (6 M, 8 M and 10 M) and two curing methods (heat and ambient curing) and three levels of replacement using Bagasse ash (10%, 20% and 30%) were investigated. This experimental results showed that a considerable improvement in compressive strength for Bagasse ash with marble waste blended alkali-activated mortar specimens compared to only Bagasse ash blended mortar specimens. Moreover, the strength of Bagasse ash blended specimens was increased with molarity. Ambient cured Bagasse ash blended specimens exhibited higher strength compared to the heat cured specimens.

  • Sugarcane Bagasse Ash-Blended Concrete for Effective Resource Utilization Between Sugar and Construction Industries
    Sugar Tech, 2020
    Co-Authors: T. Murugesan, R. Vidjeapriya, A. Bahurudeen

    Abstract:

    Sugarcane Bagasse ash can be used as an alternative cementitious material. However, lack of performance evaluation hinders its effective utilization in concrete. Therefore, performance assessment of Bagasse ash in concrete is essential and a combined utilization of Bagasse ash and marble waste is not reported in the current literature. In the present study, sugarcane Bagasse ash and marble waste were used in concrete as an alternative for cement and fine aggregate, respectively. Bagasse ash-blended concrete paver blocks were cast and performance evaluation of paver specimens in terms of compressive strength, breaking load, abrasion resistance, water absorption was determined. Incorporation of marble waste as an alternative material to the commonly used fine aggregate led to a significant improvement in abrasion resistance and marginal improvement in the compressive strength. Results from the experimental study showed that there was a significant improvement in strength and durability of Bagasse ash-blended concrete specimens up to 20% replacement level when compared to the conventional concrete specimens.

  • Development of sugarcane Bagasse ash based Portland pozzolana cement and evaluation of compatibility with superplasticizers
    Construction and Building Materials, 2014
    Co-Authors: A. Bahurudeen, A. V. Marckson, Arun Kishore, Manu Santhanam

    Abstract:

    Sugarcane Bagasse ash is a by-product from sugar industries and can be used as supplementary cementitious material in concrete. The development of new cementitious blends with processed sample of sugarcane Bagasse ash is described in this paper. Utilization of various supplementary cementitious materials significantly influences fresh and hardened properties of concrete. Interaction of pozzolanic material with cement and chemical admixtures produces diverse effects in the fresh properties of blended cement concrete. This paper aims to ascertain the effect of different Bagasse ash replacements of cement on the compatibility with superplasticizers in cement paste. Sugarcane Bagasse ash based Portland pozzolana cements were produced with three different levels of replacement – 10%, 15%, and 20%. Marsh cone and mini-slump test were used to determine the effect of superplasticizer type and water binder ratio on the saturation dosage. From this study, it was observed that polycarboxylic ether based superplasticizer was more compatible with Bagasse ash blended cement than sulphonated naphthalene based superplasticizer. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.