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Behavioral Modification

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Ananias C Diokno – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • group session teaching of Behavioral Modification program bmp for urinary incontinence a randomized controlled trial among incontinent women
    International Urology and Nephrology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Ananias C Diokno, Cindy R Karl, Michelle J Lajiness, Manuel S Ocampo, Ibrahim A Ibrahim, Susan Hall

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    To determine effectiveness of Group BMP in managing female urinary incontinence (UI), using a standardized protocol taught to adult incontinent women.

  • group session teaching of Behavioral Modification program for urinary incontinence establishing the teachers
    Urologic nursing, 2007
    Co-Authors: Michelle J Lajiness, Carolyn M Sampselle, Cheryl Wolfert, Susan Hall, Ananias C Diokno

    Abstract:

    : In a past study it was determined that a nurse scientist and an urologist were able to prevent incontinence in women through teaching strategies in a group setting. This study determined that the same knowledge could be taught by an experienced nurse practitioner and an experienced urology nurse.

  • learning outcomes of a group Behavioral Modification program to prevent urinary incontinence
    International Urogynecology Journal, 2005
    Co-Authors: Carolyn M Sampselle, Kassandra L Messer, Julia S Seng, Trivellore E Raghunathan, Sandra H Hines, Ananias C Diokno

    Abstract:

    This study describes acquisition of knowledge and motor skill in bladder training (BT) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and adherence following a Behavioral Modification program (BMP). Essentially continent (0–5 episodes in past year) community-dwelling older women (n=359) were randomized to treatment (n=164), a 2-h group education session supplemented by one brief individualized session of approximately 10 min, or control (n=195), no instruction, and followed for 12 months. Knowledge, motor skill, and adherence to the BMP were documented. Changes in pelvic muscle function and voiding interval were used to validate self-reported adherence. Following group instruction, mean BT and PFMT knowledge was 90 and 86%, respectively; 68% demonstrated correct PFMT technique without additional instruction, 29% required brief instruction, and 3% were unable to learn PFMT technique. Adherence ranged from 63 to 82% for PFMT and 58 to 67% for BT. Group instruction supplemented with brief individual instruction as needed is an effective teaching method for BT and PFMT.

Carolyn M Sampselle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • group session teaching of Behavioral Modification program for urinary incontinence establishing the teachers
    Urologic nursing, 2007
    Co-Authors: Michelle J Lajiness, Carolyn M Sampselle, Cheryl Wolfert, Susan Hall, Ananias C Diokno

    Abstract:

    : In a past study it was determined that a nurse scientist and an urologist were able to prevent incontinence in women through teaching strategies in a group setting. This study determined that the same knowledge could be taught by an experienced nurse practitioner and an experienced urology nurse.

  • learning outcomes of a group Behavioral Modification program to prevent urinary incontinence
    International Urogynecology Journal, 2005
    Co-Authors: Carolyn M Sampselle, Kassandra L Messer, Julia S Seng, Trivellore E Raghunathan, Sandra H Hines, Ananias C Diokno

    Abstract:

    This study describes acquisition of knowledge and motor skill in bladder training (BT) and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and adherence following a Behavioral Modification program (BMP). Essentially continent (0–5 episodes in past year) community-dwelling older women (n=359) were randomized to treatment (n=164), a 2-h group education session supplemented by one brief individualized session of approximately 10 min, or control (n=195), no instruction, and followed for 12 months. Knowledge, motor skill, and adherence to the BMP were documented. Changes in pelvic muscle function and voiding interval were used to validate self-reported adherence. Following group instruction, mean BT and PFMT knowledge was 90 and 86%, respectively; 68% demonstrated correct PFMT technique without additional instruction, 29% required brief instruction, and 3% were unable to learn PFMT technique. Adherence ranged from 63 to 82% for PFMT and 58 to 67% for BT. Group instruction supplemented with brief individual instruction as needed is an effective teaching method for BT and PFMT.

  • prevention of urinary incontinence by Behavioral Modification program a randomized controlled trial among older women in the community
    The Journal of Urology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Ananias C Diokno, Carolyn M Sampselle, Kassandra L Messer, Trivellore E Raghunathan, Sandra H Hines, Regula A Herzog, Cindy R Karl, Maria Claudia A Leite

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTPurpose: We determined whether a Behavioral Modification program (BMP) taught to groups of continent older women would decrease the incidence of urinary incontinence, increase pelvic muscle strength and improve voiding control.Materials and Methods: We performed a randomized, controlled trial comparing a BMP treatment group to a control, no treatment group in ambulatory, postmenopausal, continent women (0 to 5 days of incontinent episodes in the previous year) 55 years and older who were followed for 12 months. Qualified volunteers from 4 Michigan counties were randomly assigned to a control or a treatment group, consisting of a 2-hour classroom presentation on BMP followed 2 to 4 weeks later with individualized evaluation to test knowledge, adherence and skills in Behavioral techniques, and brief reinforcement of the technique as needed. Followup was done by telephone and mail every 3 months except month 12, when all participants underwent final clinical evaluation. Outcome measures were continen…

Benedicte Deforche – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • mediators of physical activity change in a Behavioral Modification program for type 2 diabetes patients
    International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2011
    Co-Authors: Karlijn De Greef, Benedicte Deforche, Johannes Ruige, Catrine Tudorlocke, Jeanmarc Kaufman, Delfien Van Dyck, Neville Owen, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij

    Abstract:

    Background: Many studies have reported significant Behavioral impact of physical activity interventions. However, few have examined changes in potential mediators of change preceding Behavioral changes, resulting in a lack of information concerning how the intervention worked. Our purpose was to examine mediation effects of changes in psychosocial variables on changes in physical activity in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods: Ninety-two patients (62 ± 9 years, 30, 0 ± 2.5 kg/m 2 , 69% males) participated in a randomized controlled trial. The 24-week intervention was based on social-cognitive constructs and consisted of a face-to-face session, telephone follow-ups, and the use of a pedometer. Social-cognitive variables and physical activity (device-based and self-reported) were collected at baseline, after the 24-week intervention and at one year post-baseline. PA was measured by pedometer, accelerometer and questionnaire. Results: Post-intervention physical activity changes were mediated by coping with relapse, changes in social norm, and social modeling from family members (p ≤ 0.05). One-year physical activity changes were mediated by coping with relapse, changes in social support from family and self-efficacy towards physical activity barriers (p ≤ 0.05) Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes, initiatives to increase their physical activity could usefully focus on strategies for resuming regular patterns of activity, on engaging family social support and on building confidence about dealing with actual and perceived barriers to activity. Trial Registration: NCT00903500, ClinicalTrials.gov.

  • the effects of a pedometer based Behavioral Modification program with telephone support on physical activity and sedentary behavior in type 2 diabetes patients
    Patient Education and Counseling, 2011
    Co-Authors: Karlijn De Greef, Benedicte Deforche, Johannes Ruige, Jacques Bouckaert, Catrine Tudorlocke, Jeanmarc Kaufman, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Effectiveness of a Behavioral Modification program on physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior in diabetes patients. Methods Ninety-two patients were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The 24-weeks intervention consisted of a face-to-face session, pedometer and seven telephone follow-ups. Mean selection criteria were 35–75 years; 25–35 kg/m 2 ; ≤12% HbA1c, treated for type 2 diabetes; no PA limitations. PA and sedentary behavior were measured by pedometer, accelerometer and questionnaire over the short- (24 weeks) and intermediate- (1 year) term. Results The intervention group increased their steps/day by 2744, their total PA by 23 min/day ( p p p Conclusion This pedometer-based Behavioral Modification program with telephone support showed lasting positive effects on steps/day, PA and sedentary behavior. Practice implications This study tested a convenient way to increase PA among type 2 diabetes patients.