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Bemisia tabaci

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Laura M. Boykin – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Updated mtCOI reference dataset for the Bemisia tabaci species complex.
    F1000Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Laura M. Boykin, Anders Savill, Paul J. De Barro

    Abstract:

    Members of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci species complex cause millions of dollars of damage globally and are considered one of the world’s most invasive species. They are capable of causing extensive damage to major vegetable, grain legume and fiber crops. All member of the species complex are morphologically identical therefore, data from the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) gene sequence has been used to identify the various species. The current reference dataset that is widely used is found on the CSIRO data portal. However, the reference set stored on the CSIRO data does not include newly added sequences (2013-2017), therefore an updated reference dataset is needed.  All mtCOI data for the Bemisia tabaci species complex were downloaded on 22 May 2017 from GenBank and after quality checking, a dataset of 1,071 unique sequences and 696 base pairs was generated (https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5437420.v1).

  • Bemisia tabaci nomenclature lessons learned
    Pest Management Science, 2014
    Co-Authors: Laura M. Boykin

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND
    The nomenclature used within the whitefly research community for different putative species within Bemisia tabaci (sensu Russell) remains highly variable and confused. This was evident by the many different naming schemes researchers were using in their presentations at the 1st International Whitefly Symposium in Kolymbari, Crete, Greece (20–24 May 2013). I wanted to try to document how we, as a community, have arrived at such a state of confused nomenclature. This also included an investigation of the nomenclature used in the literature (from 2002 to 2012) by means of two online search tools (Web of Science and Scirus).

    RESULTS
    Nomenclatural data were collected at the 1st International Whitefly Symposium, based on oral presentations and posters. There were 17 different names used for the MED species and 12 different names used for the MEAM1 species of the B. tabaci species complex. Investigation of the literature revealed limited uptake of the intermediate names.

    CONCLUSION
    The intermediate names for the various species in the B. tabaci species complex – MED, MEAM1, New World, etc. – are not being used by the wider whitefly community. To move forwarrd as a community, we must work towards a formal revision of the B. tabaci complex. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

  • Bemisia tabaci a statement of species status
    Annual Review of Entomology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Paul J. De Barro, Laura M. Boykin, Adam B Dinsdale

    Abstract:

    Bemisia tabaci has long been considered a complex species. It rose to global prominence in the 1980s owing to the global invasion by the commonly named B biotype. Since then, the concomitant eruption of a group of plant viruses known as begomoviruses has created considerable management problems in many countries. However, an enduring set of questions remains: Is B. tabaci a complex species or a species complex, what are Bemisia biotypes, and how did all the genetic variability arise? This review considers these issues and concludes that there is now sufficient evidence to state that B. tabaci is not made up of biotypes and that the use of biotype in this context is erroneous and misleading. Instead, B. tabaci is a complex of 11 well-defined high-level groups containing at least 24 morphologically indistinguishable species.

Paul J. De Barro – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Updated mtCOI reference dataset for the Bemisia tabaci species complex.
    F1000Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Laura M. Boykin, Anders Savill, Paul J. De Barro

    Abstract:

    Members of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci species complex cause millions of dollars of damage globally and are considered one of the world’s most invasive species. They are capable of causing extensive damage to major vegetable, grain legume and fiber crops. All member of the species complex are morphologically identical therefore, data from the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) gene sequence has been used to identify the various species. The current reference dataset that is widely used is found on the CSIRO data portal. However, the reference set stored on the CSIRO data does not include newly added sequences (2013-2017), therefore an updated reference dataset is needed.  All mtCOI data for the Bemisia tabaci species complex were downloaded on 22 May 2017 from GenBank and after quality checking, a dataset of 1,071 unique sequences and 696 base pairs was generated (https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5437420.v1).

  • Bemisia tabaci a statement of species status
    Annual Review of Entomology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Paul J. De Barro, Laura M. Boykin, Adam B Dinsdale

    Abstract:

    Bemisia tabaci has long been considered a complex species. It rose to global prominence in the 1980s owing to the global invasion by the commonly named B biotype. Since then, the concomitant eruption of a group of plant viruses known as begomoviruses has created considerable management problems in many countries. However, an enduring set of questions remains: Is B. tabaci a complex species or a species complex, what are Bemisia biotypes, and how did all the genetic variability arise? This review considers these issues and concludes that there is now sufficient evidence to state that B. tabaci is not made up of biotypes and that the use of biotype in this context is erroneous and misleading. Instead, B. tabaci is a complex of 11 well-defined high-level groups containing at least 24 morphologically indistinguishable species.

Anastasia Tsagkarakou – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Insecticide resistance in Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) populations from Crete.
    Pest Management Science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emmanouil Roditakis, N. E. Roditakis, Anastasia Tsagkarakou

    Abstract:

    The resistance levels to alpha-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, pirimiphos-methyl, endosulfan and imidacloprid were determined in Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) from Crete. Five B tabaci populations collected from greenhouse and outdoor crops were bioassayed and compared with a reference susceptible strain. Bemisia tabaci collected in a floriculture greenhouse exhibited the highest resistance against all insecticides: at LC50, resistance factors were 23-fold for bifenthrin, 80-fold for alpha-cypermethrin, 18-fold for pirimiphos-methyl, 58-fold for endosulfan and 730-fold for imidacloprid. A population collected on outdoor melons was more susceptible than the reference strain against all insecticides tested, suggesting the occurrence of local highly susceptible B tabaci populations in ‘refugia’. In pairwise comparisons of resistance levels, correlation was observed between the LC50 values of the pyrethroid insecticides bifenthrin and alpha-cypermethrin.

  • insecticide resistance in Bemisia tabaci homoptera aleyrodidae populations from crete
    Pest Management Science, 2005
    Co-Authors: Emmanouil Roditakis, N. E. Roditakis, Anastasia Tsagkarakou

    Abstract:

    The resistance levels to α-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, pirimiphos-methyl, endosulfan and imidacloprid were determined in Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) from Crete. Five B tabaci populations collected from greenhouse and outdoor crops were bioassayed and compared with a reference susceptible strain. Bemisia tabaci collected in a floriculture greenhouse exhibited the highest resistance against all insecticides: at LC50, resistance factors were 23-fold for bifenthrin, 80-fold for α-cypermethrin, 18-fold for pirimiphos-methyl, 58-fold for endosulfan and 730-fold for imidacloprid. A population collected on outdoor melons was more susceptible than the reference strain against all insecticides tested, suggesting the occurrence of local highly susceptible B tabaci populations in ‘refugia’. In pairwise comparisons of resistance levels, correlation was observed between the LC50 values of the pyrethroid insecticides bifenthrin and α-cypermethrin.  2005 Society of Chemical Industry