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Bioethanol

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Bruce E Dale – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • global potential Bioethanol production from wasted crops and crop residues
    Biomass & Bioenergy, 2004
    Co-Authors: Bruce E Dale

    Abstract:

    Abstract The global annual potential Bioethanol production from the major crops, corn, barley, oat, rice, wheat, sorghum, and sugar cane, is estimated. To avoid conflicts between human food use and industrial use of crops, only the wasted crop, which is defined as crop lost in distribution, is considered as feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass such as crop residues and sugar cane bagasse are included in feedstock for producing Bioethanol as well. There are about 73.9 Tg of dry wasted crops in the world that could potentially produce 49.1 GL year −1 of Bioethanol. About 1.5 Pg year −1 of dry lignocellulosic biomass from these seven crops is also available for conversion to Bioethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass could produce up to 442 GL year −1 of Bioethanol. Thus, the total potential Bioethanol production from crop residues and wasted crops is 491 GL year −1 , about 16 times higher than the current world ethanol production. The potential Bioethanol production could replace 353 GL of gasoline (32% of the global gasoline consumption) when Bioethanol is used in E85 fuel for a midsize passenger vehicle. Furthermore, lignin-rich fermentation residue, which is the coproduct of Bioethanol made from crop residues and sugar cane bagasse, can potentially generate both 458 TWh of electricity (about 3.6% of world electricity production) and 2.6 EJ of steam. Asia is the largest potential producer of Bioethanol from crop residues and wasted crops, and could produce up to 291 GL year −1 of Bioethanol. Rice straw, wheat straw, and corn stover are the most favorable Bioethanol feedstocks in Asia. The next highest potential region is Europe ( 69.2 GL of Bioethanol), in which most Bioethanol comes from wheat straw. Corn stover is the main feedstock in North America, from which about 38.4 GL year −1 of Bioethanol can potentially be produced. Globally rice straw can produce 205 GL of Bioethanol, which is the largest amount from single biomass feedstock. The next highest potential feedstock is wheat straw, which can produce 104 GL of Bioethanol. This paper is intended to give some perspective on the size of the Bioethanol feedstock resource, globally and by region, and to summarize relevant data that we believe others will find useful, for example, those who are interested in producing biobased products such as lactic acid, rather than ethanol, from crops and wastes. The paper does not attempt to indicate how much, if any, of this waste material could actually be converted to Bioethanol.

  • Global potential Bioethanol production from wasted crops and crop residues
    Biomass and Bioenergy, 2004
    Co-Authors: Seungdo Kim, Bruce E Dale

    Abstract:

    The global annual potential Bioethanol production from the major crops, corn, barley, oat, rice, wheat, sorghum, and sugar cane, is estimated. To avoid conflicts between human food use and industrial use of crops, only the wasted crop, which is defined as crop lost in distribution, is considered as feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass such as crop residues and sugar cane bagasse are included in feedstock for producing Bioethanol as well. There are about 73.9 Tg of dry wasted crops in the world that could potentially produce 49.1 GL year-1 of Bioethanol. About 1.5 Pg year-1 of dry lignocellulosic biomass from these seven crops is also available for conversion to Bioethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass could produce up to 442 GL year -1 of Bioethanol. Thus, the total potential Bioethanol production from crop residues and wasted crops is 491 GL year-1, about 16 times higher than the current world ethanol production. The potential Bioethanol production could replace 353 GL of gasoline (32% of the global gasoline consumption) when Bioethanol is used in E85 fuel for a midsize passenger vehicle. Furthermore, lignin-rich fermentation residue, which is the coproduct of Bioethanol made from crop residues and sugar cane bagasse, can potentially generate both 458 TWh of electricity (about 3.6% of world electricity production) and 2.6 EJ of steam. Asia is the largest potential producer of Bioethanol from crop residues and wasted crops, and could produce up to 291 GL year-1 of Bioethanol. Rice straw, wheat straw, and corn stover are the most favorable Bioethanol feedstocks in Asia. The next highest potential region is Europe (69.2 GL of Bioethanol), in which most Bioethanol comes from wheat straw. Corn stover is the main feedstock in North America, from which about 38.4 GL year-1 of Bioethanol can potentially be produced. Globally rice straw can produce 205 GL of Bioethanol, which is the largest amount from single biomass feedstock. The next highest potential feedstock is wheat straw, which can produce 104 GL of Bioethanol. This paper is intended to give some perspective on the size of the Bioethanol feedstock resource, globally and by region, and to summarize relevant data that we believe others will find useful, for example, those who are interested in producing biobased products such as lactic acid, rather than ethanol, from crops and wastes. The paper does not attempt to indicate how much, if any, of this waste material could actually be converted to Bioethanol. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Ayhan Demirbas – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biofuels sources, biofuel policy, biofuel economy and global biofuel projections
    Energy Conversion and Management, 2008
    Co-Authors: Ayhan Demirbas

    Abstract:

    The term biofuel is referred to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. Biofuels include Bioethanol, biomethanol, vegetable oils, biodiesel, biogas, bio-synthetic gas (bio-syngas), bio-oil, bio-char, Fischer-Tropsch liquids, and biohydrogen. Most traditional biofuels, such as ethanol from corn, wheat, or sugar beets, and biodiesel from oil seeds, are produced from classic agricultural food crops that require high-quality agricultural land for growth. Bioethanol is a petrol additive/substitute. Biomethanol can be produced from biomass using bio-syngas obtained from steam reforming process of biomass. Biomethanol is considerably easier to recover than the Bioethanol from biomass. Ethanol forms an azeotrope with water so it is expensive to purify the ethanol during recovery. Methanol recycles easier because it does not form an azeotrope. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification. There has been renewed interest in the use of vegetable oils for making biodiesel due to its less polluting and renewable nature as against the conventional petroleum diesel fuel. Due to its environmental merits, the share of biofuel in the automotive fuel market will grow fast in the next decade. There are several reasons for biofuels to be considered as relevant technologies by both developing and industrialized countries. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. The biofuel economy will grow rapidly during the 21st century. Its economy development is based on agricultural production and most people live in the rural areas. In the most biomass-intensive scenario, modernized biomass energy contributes by 2050 about one half of total energy demand in developing countries.

  • Biofuels sources, biofuel policy, biofuel economy and global biofuel projections
    Energy Conversion and Management, 2008
    Co-Authors: Ayhan Demirbas

    Abstract:

    The term biofuel is referred to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. Biofuels include Bioethanol, biomethanol, vegetable oils, biodiesel, biogas, bio-synthetic gas (bio-syngas), bio-oil, bio-char, Fischer-Tropsch liquids, and biohydrogen. Most traditional biofuels, such as ethanol from corn, wheat, or sugar beets, and biodiesel from oil seeds, are produced from classic agricultural food crops that require high-quality agricultural land for growth. Bioethanol is a petrol additive/substitute. Biomethanol can be produced from biomass using bio-syngas obtained from steam reforming process of biomass. Biomethanol is considerably easier to recover than the Bioethanol from biomass. Ethanol forms an azeotrope with water so it is expensive to purify the ethanol during recovery. Methanol recycles easier because it does not form an azeotrope. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification. There has been renewed interest in the use of vegetable oils for making biodiesel due to its less polluting and renewable nature as against the conventional petroleum diesel fuel. Due to its environmental merits, the share of biofuel in the automotive fuel market will grow fast in the next decade. There are several reasons for biofuels to be considered as relevant technologies by both developing and industrialized countries. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. The biofuel economy will grow rapidly during the 21st century. Its economy development is based on agricultural production and most people live in the rural areas. In the most biomass-intensive scenario, modernized biomass energy contributes by 2050 about one half of total energy demand in developing countries. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Progress and recent trends in biofuels
    Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ayhan Demirbas

    Abstract:

    In this paper, the modern biomass-based transportation fuels such as fuels from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, Bioethanol, fatty acid (m)ethylester, biomethanol, and biohydrogen are briefly reviewed. Here, the term biofuel is referred to as liquid or gaseous fuels for the transport sector that are predominantly produced from biomass. There are several reasons for bio-fuels to be considered as relevant technologies by both developing and industrialized countries. They include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. The term modern biomass is generally used to describe the traditional biomass use through the efficient and clean combustion technologies and sustained supply of biomass resources, environmentally sound and competitive fuels, heat and electricity using modern conversion technologies. Modern biomass can be used for the generation of electricity and heat. Bioethanol and biodiesel as well as diesel produced from biomass by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are the most modern biomass-based transportation fuels. Bio-ethanol is a petrol additive/substitute. It is possible that wood, straw and even household wastes may be economically converted to bio-ethanol. Bio-ethanol is derived from alcoholic fermentation of sucrose or simple sugars, which are produced from biomass by hydrolysis process. Currently crops generating starch, sugar or oil are the basis for transport fuel production. There has been renewed interest in the use of vegetable oils for making biodiesel due to its less polluting and renewable nature as against the conventional petroleum diesel fuel. Biodiesel is a renewable replacement to petroleum-based diesel. Biomass energy conversion facilities are important for obtaining bio-oil. Pyrolysis is the most important process among the thermal conversion processes of biomass. Brief summaries of the basic concepts involved in the thermochemical conversions of biomass fuels are presented. The percentage share of biomass was 62.1% of the total renewable energy sources in 1995. The reduction of greenhouse gases pollution is the main advantage of utilizing biomass energy. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

H. B. Aditiya – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a perspective on Bioethanol production from biomass as alternative fuel for spark ignition engine
    RSC Advances, 2016
    Co-Authors: A.h. Sebayang, H. B. Aditiya, Teuku Meurah Indra Mahlia, H H Masjuki, S Dharma, A S Silitonga

    Abstract:

    The increasing consumption of fossil fuels has led to the development of alternative fuels for the future. Domestic biofuel production and the utilization of alternative fuels can decrease dependency on petroleum oil, reduce trade deficits, reduce air pollution and reduce carbon dioxide emission. Bioethanol is a renewable fuel produced by the fermentation of sugar which is derived from plants such as sugarcane or beet, maize, or cassava etc. However, Bioethanol consumption in an engine is approximately 51% higher than gasoline since the energy per unit volume of ethanol is 34% lower than for gasoline. Bioethanol is an oxygenated fuel that contains 35% oxygen, which can reduce particulate matter and NOx emissions caused by combustion of the fuel. Therefore, Bioethanol–gasoline blends can significantly reduce petroleum use and GHG emission. In addition, utilization of lignocellulosic materials in Bioethanol production is the most viable pathway from an environmental point of view. This paper reviews the current status and technologies involved in Bioethanol production and the properties and engine performance from various biomass feedstocks which are the recommended sustainable alternative fuel in the future.

  • Second generation Bioethanol production: A critical review
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2016
    Co-Authors: H. B. Aditiya, Teuku Meurah Indra Mahlia, Hadi Nur, A.h. Sebayang

    Abstract:

    It is a popular fact that the world’s dependency on fossil fuel has caused unfavourable effects, including lessening crude oil reserve, decreasing air quality, rising global temperature, unpredictable weather change, and so on. As the effort to promote sustainability and independency from fossil fuel, Bioethanol is now favoured as the blend or fossil petrol substitute. However, the feedstock functionality of first generation Bioethanol production is restricted due to its edibleness since it would clash the feeding purpose. Second generation Bioethanol production fulfils the impractical gap of first generation since it employs non-edible feedstock sourced from agriculture and forestry wastes. Lignocellulosic and starchy materials in them are convertible to fermentable sugars that are able to be further processed, resulting anhydrous Bioethanol as the end product. This paper critically reviews the existing variance of second generation Bioethanol production methodologies, namely pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation and distillation, as well as the worth of second generation production for future reference. The discussions in this paper are also fit as the fundamental for feasible planning of second generation Bioethanol production plant.