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Biofoam

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mikael S Hedenqvist – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A facile way of making inexpensive rigid and soft protein Biofoams with rapid liquid absorption
    Industrial Crops and Products, 2018
    Co-Authors: B. Alander, Antonio Jose Capezza, Qiong Wu, Eva Johansson, Richard T. Olsson, Mikael S Hedenqvist

    Abstract:

    A novel and facile method to produce inexpensive protein Biofoams suitable for sponge applications is presented. The protein used in the study was wheat gluten (WG), readily available as a by/co-pr …

  • Conductive Biofoams of wheat gluten containing carbon nanotubes, carbon black or reduced graphene oxide
    RSC Advances, 2017
    Co-Authors: Qiong Wu, Mikael S Hedenqvist, Henrik Sundborg, Richard L. Andersson, Kevin Peuvot, Leonard Gaston Guex, Fritjof Nilsson, Richard T. Olsson

    Abstract:

    Conductive Biofoams made from glycerol-plasticized wheat gluten (WGG) are presented as a potential substitute in electrical applications for conductive polymer foams from crude oil. The soft plasticised foams were prepared by conventional freeze-drying of wheat gluten suspensions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon black (CB) or reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as the conductive filler phase. The change in conductivity upon compression was documented and the results show not only that the CNT-filled foams show a conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than foams filled with the CB particles, but also that there is a significantly lower percolation threshold with percolation occurring already at 0.18 vol%. The rGO-filled foams gave a conductivity inferior to that obtained with the CNTs or CB particles, which is explained as being related to the sheet-like morphology of the rGO flakes. An increasing amount of conductive filler resulted in smaller pore sizes for both CNTs and CB particles due to their interference with the ice crystal formation before the lyophilization process. The conductive WGG foams with CNTs were fully elastic with up to 10% compressive strain, but with increasing compression up to 50% strain the recovery gradually decreased. The data show that the conductivity strongly depends on the type as well as the concentration of the conductive filler, and the conductivity data with different compressions applied to these Biofoams are presented for the first time.

  • Freeze-dried wheat gluten Biofoams; scaling up with water welding
    Industrial Crops and Products, 2017
    Co-Authors: Qiong Wu, Eva Johansson, Richard T. Olsson, Vilhelm Lindh, Mikael S Hedenqvist

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a simple and rapid wet welding technique that enables the scaling up of freeze-dried protein (wheat gluten (WG)) Biofoams for e.g. thermal insulation applications. The welding occurred by first wetting faces of foam cubes in water and then pressing them together for a limited time period. The water plasticized thin cell-walls of the two foams formed a dense weld when the plasticized cells collapsed under the drying step. The welds were always stronger and stiffer than the surrounding cellular structure. Based on three-point bending, it was shown that welded specimens (four-cube samples) were 7 times stronger than specimens produced directly as one piece with similar total size. This illustrated the problem of freeze-drying larger products; by instead assembling smaller foams into a large object the overall foam structure became more homogeneous. In addition, the dense welds become “walls” that limit gas convection in the mainly open cell structure, beneficial for thermal insulation. This is the first report on combined freeze-drying and water welding. It shows the sustainable potential of the technique for foam production, since only water is used as a foaming/welding agent.

Guo Hong – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • three dimensional functionalized carbon tin iv sulfide Biofoam for photocatalytical purification of chromium vi containing wastewater
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yunlei Zhong, Haifeng Li, Dong Fang, Guo Hong

    Abstract:

    Carbon-based materials are widely used for environmental remediation because of their unique and excellent performances. Because of the huge daily consumption of such materials, the economic and environmental friendly derivations from natural biomass are highly desired. Herein, a new biocarbon composite, carbonized loofah/tin(IV) sulfide (CLF@SnS2) foam, was successfully prepared using loofah Biofoam through an efficient and scalable method. The hierarchical CLF@SnS2 foam has a high-porous structure, which can provide channels for light traveling through the whole material. It is confirmed that such three-dimensional photocatalytic material can quickly purify Cr(VI)-containing wastewater under mild visible light irradiation, with a efficiency of 99.7% Cr(VI) reduction within 120 min. By contrast, CLF@SnS2 showed much better visible photocatalytic capacity than the uncarbonized counterpart (UCLF@SnS2), because the photoelectrons produced by the SnS2 nanosheets can be rapidly exported by the continuous chan…

  • Three Dimensional Functionalized Carbon/Tin(IV) Sulfide Biofoam for Photocatalytical Purification of Chromium(VI)-Containing Wastewater
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yunlei Zhong, Haifeng Li, Dong Fang, Guo Hong

    Abstract:

    Carbon-based materials are widely used for environmental remediation because of their unique and excellent performances. Because of the huge daily consumption of such materials, the economic and environmental friendly derivations from natural biomass are highly desired. Herein, a new biocarbon composite, carbonized loofah/tin(IV) sulfide (CLF@SnS2) foam, was successfully prepared using loofah Biofoam through an efficient and scalable method. The hierarchical CLF@SnS2 foam has a high-porous structure, which can provide channels for light traveling through the whole material. It is confirmed that such three-dimensional photocatalytic material can quickly purify Cr(VI)-containing wastewater under mild visible light irradiation, with a efficiency of 99.7% Cr(VI) reduction within 120 min. By contrast, CLF@SnS2 showed much better visible photocatalytic capacity than the uncarbonized counterpart (UCLF@SnS2), because the photoelectrons produced by the SnS2 nanosheets can be rapidly exported by the continuous chan…

Manju Misra – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • lignin as a reactive reinforcing filler for water blown rigid Biofoam composites from soy oil based polyurethane
    Industrial Crops and Products, 2013
    Co-Authors: Amar K. Mohanty, Manju Misra

    Abstract:

    Abstract In this study, lignin (from bioethanol production) is used as a reactive reinforcing filler. A novel soy-based polyurethane Biofoam (BioPU) from two polyols (soybean oil-derived polyol SOPEP and petrochemical polyol Jeffol A-630) and poly(diphenylmethane diisocyanate) (pMDI) has been prepared by a self-rising method using water as a blowing agent with and without lignin. The BioPU samples were evaluated for mechanical and thermal properties, and density. The cell morphology of the resulting lignin reinforced Biofoam was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and found to be in line with the cell structure modifications induced by the reinforcing lignin. Densities of the resultant composites were increased as a result of increased lignin content. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study exhibited characteristic peaks for lignin and BioPU. Mechanical properties of the samples were improved with the increase of lignin content, and the samples with 10% lignin had the best mechanical properties. Similarly, glass transition temperature (Tg) and storage modulus around and after Tg were increased over neat Biofoam without lignin. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results coincided with the improvement of mechanical properties and showed better thermal stability of the composites over the neat Biofoam. Thermogravimetric analysis showed improved thermal stability of the Biofoams reinforced with lignin. Therefore, this research has provided a simple method of preparing the Biofoam, while exploring the potential of using lignin in polyurethane applications.

  • Water‐Blown Rigid Biofoams from Soy‐Based Biopolyurethane and Microcrystalline Cellulose
    Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 2012
    Co-Authors: Amar K. Mohanty, Manju Misra

    Abstract:

    A novel soy-based polyurethane Biofoam (BioPU) from two polyols (soybean oil-derived polyols SOPEP and petrochemical polyol Jeffol A-630 = 1:1 in weight) and poly (diphenylmethane diisocyanate) (pMDI) has been prepared by using a free-rise method with water as a blowing agent, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a reinforcement. The photographs of the samples show that the Biofoams have similar appearances, and the cell morphology of the resulting Biofoams was examined by scanning electron microscope. Density of the composites decreased as a result of increase in MCC content. FTIR study exhibited characteristic peaks for MCC and BioPU. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength, compressive modulus, flexural strength and flexural modulus of the samples were substantially improved with the increase in MCC content. Similarly, improvements in glass transition temperature (T g) and storage modulus around and after T g of the neat Biofoam were also observed with the composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed an improvement in mechanical properties as well as better thermal stability of the composites over the neat Biofoam. Thermogravimetric analysis showed improved thermal stability of the Biofoams reinforced with MCC. This research has provided a simple method for preparing the Biofoam, while exploring the potential of substituting up to 50 % of the petroleum-based polyol in Biofoam applications.