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Biomaterials Processing

The Experts below are selected from a list of 117 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Antoni P Tomsia – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bioactive glass in tissue engineering
    Acta Biomaterialia, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mohamed N. Rahaman, Qiang Fu, Steven B. Jung, Lynda F. Bonewald, Antoni P Tomsia

    Abstract:

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in Biomaterials Processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed.

  • Bioactive glass in tissue engineering
    Acta Biomaterialia, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mohamed N. Rahaman, Delbert E. Day, B. Sonny Bal, Qiang Fu, Steven B. Jung, Lynda F. Bonewald, Antoni P Tomsia

    Abstract:

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in Biomaterials Processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

David J. Mooney – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Open pore biodegradable matrices formed with gas foaming
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, 1998
    Co-Authors: Leatrese Harris, David J. Mooney

    Abstract:

    Engineering tissues utilizing biodegradable polymer matrices is a promising approach to the treatment of a number of diseases. However, Processing techniques utilized to fabricate these matrices typically involve organic solvents and/or high temperatures. Here we describe a process for fabricating matrices without the use of organic solvents and/or elevated temperatures. Disks comprised of polymer [e.g., poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] and NaCl particles were compression molded at room temperature and subsequently allowed to equilibrate with high pressure CO2 gas (800 psi). Creation of a thermodynamic instability led to the nucleation and growth of gas pores in the polymer particles, resulting in the expansion of the polymer particles. The polymer particles fused to form a continuous matrix with entrapped salt particles. The NaCl particles subsequently were leached to yield macropores within the polymer matrix. The overall porosity and level of pore connectivity were regulated by the ratio of polymer/salt particles and the size of salt particles. Both the compressive modulus (159 ± 130 kPa versus 289 ± 25 kPa) and the tensile modulus (334 ± 52 kPa versus 1100 ± 236 kPa) of the matrices formed with this approach were significantly greater than those formed with a standard solvent casting/particulate leaching process. The utility of these matrices was demonstrated by engineering smooth muscle tissue in vitro with them. This novel process, a combination of high pressure gas foaming and particulate leaching techniques, allows one to fabricate matrices with a well controlled porosity and pore structure. This process avoids the potential negatives associated with the use of high temperatures and/or organic solvents in Biomaterials Processing. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 42, 396–402, 1998.

  • Open pore biodegradable matrices formed with gas foaming
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, 1998
    Co-Authors: L. D. Harris, Bong Seok Kim, David J. Mooney

    Abstract:

    Engineering tissues utilizing biodegradable polymer matrices is a promising approach to the treatment of a number of diseases. However, Processing techniques utilized to fabricate these matrices typically involve organic solvents and/or high temperatures. Here we describe a process for fabricating matrices without the use of organic solvents and/or elevated temperatures. Disks comprised of polymer [e.g., poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] and NaCl particles were compression molded at room temperature and subsequently allowed to equilibrate with high pressure CO2 gas (800 psi). Creation of a thermodynamic instability led to the nucleation and growth of gas pores in the polymer particles, resulting in the expansion of the polymer particles. The polymer particles fused to form a continuous matrix with entrapped salt particles. The NaCl particles subsequently were leached to yield macropores within the polymer matrix. The overall porosity and level of pore connectivity were regulated by the ratio of polymer/salt particles and the size of salt particles. Both the compressive modulus (159+/-130 kPa versus 289+/-25 kPa) and the tensile modulus (334+/-52 kPa versus 1100+/-236 kPa) of the matrices formed with this approach were significantly greater than those formed with a standard solvent casting/particulate leaching process. The utility of these matrices was demonstrated by engineering smooth muscle tissue in vitro with them. This novel process, a combination of high pressure gas foaming and particulate leaching techniques, allows one to fabricate matrices with a well controlled porosity and pore structure. This process avoids the potential negatives associated with the use of high temperatures and/or organic solvents in Biomaterials Processing.

Syed A. M. Tofail – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • 3.22 Spark Plasma Sintering of Lead-Free Ferroelectric Ceramic Layers
    Comprehensive Materials Finishing, 2017
    Co-Authors: M. Karimi-jafari, K. Kowal, Syed A. M. Tofail

    Abstract:

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has emerged as a highly promising technique for materials sintering and production and can be used in surface coating and finishes as well as bulk material productions. This paper is devoted to study the parameters involved in SPS sintering of lead ferroelectric ceramics. A short general review on sintering is given followed by a history of SPS method. After this SPS of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HAp) and barium titanate have been presented in more details. Finally, potential capabilities of SPS technique in ferroelectric ceramics and Biomaterials Processing have been outlined.

  • Spark Plasma Sintering of Lead-Free Ferroelectric Ceramic Layers
    Comprehensive Materials Finishing, 2016
    Co-Authors: M. Karimi-jafari, K. Kowal, E. Haq, Syed A. M. Tofail

    Abstract:

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has emerged as a highly promising technique for materials sintering and production and can be used in surface coating and finishes as well as bulk material productions. This paper is devoted to study the parameters involved in SPS sintering of lead ferroelectric ceramics. A short general review on sintering is given followed by a history of SPS method. After this SPS of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HAp) and barium titanate have been presented in more details. Finally, potential capabilities of SPS technique in ferroelectric ceramics and Biomaterials Processing have been outlined.