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Bionanotechnology

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3456 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

David J Evans – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • applications of plant viruses in Bionanotechnology
    Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, 2014
    Co-Authors: George P Lomonossoff, David J Evans

    Abstract:

    : The capsids of most plant viruses are simple and robust structures consisting of multiple copies of one or a few types of protein subunit arranged with either icosahedral or helical symmetry. In many cases, capsids can be produced in large quantities either by the infection of plants or by the expression of the subunit(s) in a variety of heterologous systems. In view of their relative simplicity, stability and ease of production, plant virus particles or virus-like particles (VLPs) have attracted attention as potential reagents for applications in Bionanotechnology. As a result, plant virus particles have been subjected to both genetic and chemical modification, have been used to encapsulate foreign material and have, themselves, been incorporated into supramolecular structures.

  • exploitation of plant and archaeal viruses in Bionanotechnology
    Biochemical Society Transactions, 2009
    Co-Authors: David J Evans

    Abstract:

    CPMV (cowpea mosaic virus), a plant virus, is a naturally occurring sphere-like nanoparticle, and is used as a synthon and/or template in bionanoscience. The virions formed by CPMV can be regarded as programmable nanobuilding blocks with a diameter of ∼30 nm. A range of molecules have been attached to this viral nanoscaffold, yielding stable nanoparticles that display multiple copies of the desired molecule. It has been shown that, in addition to surface amine groups, surface carboxy groups are also addressable, and a procedure has been developed that enables introduction of reactive thiols at the virion surface that avoids virus aggregation. Furthermore, the virions can be functionalized to form electroactive nanoparticles. Methods for the construction of arrays and multilayers, using a layer-by-layer approach, have been established. As proof of concept, for example, CPMV particles have been immobilized on surfaces and arranged in defined layers. Engineered variants of CPMV can be used as templates for mineralization with, for example, silica to give monodisperse robust silica nanoparticles of ∼32 nm. SIRV2 ( Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2), is a robust archaeal virus, resistant to high temperature and low pH. SIRV2 can act as a template for site-selective and spatially controlled chemical modification. Both the ends and the body of the virus, or the ends only, can be chemically addressed; SIRV2 can be regarded as a structurally unique nanobuilding block.

  • utilisation of plant viruses in Bionanotechnology
    Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, 2007
    Co-Authors: Nicole F Steinmetz, David J Evans

    Abstract:

    The capsids of most plant viruses are simple and robust structures consisting of multiple copies of one or a few types of protein subunit arranged with either icosahedral or helical symmetry. In many cases, capsids can be produced in large quantities either by the infection of plants or by the expression of the subunit(s) in a variety of heterologous systems. In view of their relative simplicity, stability and ease of production, plant virus particles or virus-like particles (VLPs) have attracted attention as potential reagents for applications in Bionanotechnology. As a result, plant virus particles have been subjected to both genetic and chemical modification, have been used to encapsulate foreign material and have, themselves, been incorporated into supramolecular structures.

Hiroshi Matsui – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • peptide based nanotubes and their applications in Bionanotechnology
    Advanced Materials, 2005
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Matsui

    Abstract:

    In nature, biological nanomaterials are synthesized under ambient conditions in a natural microscopic-sized laboratory, such as a cell. Biological molecules, such as peptides and proteins, undergo self-assembly processes in vivo and in vitro, and these monomers are assembled into various nanometer-scale structures at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The self-assembled peptide nanostructures can be further organized to form nanowires, nanotubes, and nanoparticles via their molecular-recognition functions. The application of molecular self-assemblies of synthetic peptides as nanometer-scale building blocks in devices is robust, practical, and affordable due to their advantages of reproducibility, large-scale production ability, monodispersity, and simpler experimental methods. It is also beneficial that smart functionalities can be added at desired positions in peptide nanotubes through well-established chemical and peptide syntheses. These features of peptide-based nanotubes are the driving force for investigating and developing peptide nanotube assemblies for biological and non-biological applications.

Antonio Villaverde – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • nanotechnology Bionanotechnology and microbial cell factories
    Microbial Cell Factories, 2010
    Co-Authors: Antonio Villaverde

    Abstract:

    Nanotechnology is increasingly using both materials and nano-objects synthesized by living beings, most of them produced by microbial cells. Emerging technologies and highly integrative approaches (such as ‘omics and systems biology), that have been largely proven successful for the production of proteins and secondary metabolites are now expected to become fully adapted for the improved biological production of nanostructured materials with tailored properties. The so far underestimated potential of microbial cell factories in nanotechnology and nanomedicine is expected to emerge, in the next years, in the context of novel needs envisaged in the nanoscience universe. This should prompt a careful revisiting of the microbial cell factories as the most versatile biological platforms to supply functional materials for nanotechnological applications.