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Birth Outcomes

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Drora Fraser – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Preconceptional diet quality is associated with Birth Outcomes among low socioeconomic status minority women in a high-income country
    European Journal of Nutrition, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kathleen Abu-saad, Vered Kaufman-shriqui, Laurence S. Freedman, Ilana Belmaker, Drora Fraser

    Abstract:

    Purpose Studies of the association between maternal nutrition and Birth Outcomes have investigated differing nutrients, maternal socioeconomic conditions, and timing within the reproductive cycle; and have produced inconsistent results. We evaluated the association of preconceptional maternal dietary intake with Birth Outcomes among low socioeconomic status ethnic minority women in a high-income country. Methods In this prospective cohort study, habitual preconceptional dietary intake was assessed among pregnant Bedouin Arab women in Israel ( n  = 384), using a short culturally specific, targeted food frequency questionnaire. Multiple nutrients (protein, lysine, calcium, iron, zinc, folate, omega-3 fatty acids) were evaluated simultaneously via a diet quality score derived from principal component analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to test associations between the diet quality score and a composite adverse Birth Outcomes variable, including preterm Birth, low Birth weight and small for gestational age. Results Sixty-nine women (18%) had adverse Birth Outcomes. Women with low preconceptional diet quality scores had low intakes of nutrient-rich plant foods, bioavailable micronutrients, and complete proteins. In multivariable analysis, a woman at the 10th percentile of the diet quality score had a 2.97 higher odds (95% CI 1.28–6.86) of an adverse Birth outcome than a woman at the 90th percentile. Conclusion Low diet quality during the preconceptional period was associated with adverse Birth Outcomes among low socioeconomic status minority women in a high-income country. The results have implications for the development of appropriate intervention strategies to prevent adverse Birth Outcomes, and the promotion of adequate nutrition throughout the child-bearing years.

  • maternal nutrition and Birth Outcomes
    Epidemiologic Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kathleen Abusaad, Drora Fraser

    Abstract:

    In this review, the authors summarize current knowledge on material nutritional requirements during pregnancy, with a focus on the nutrients that have been most comonly investigated in association with Birth Outcomes. Data sourcing and extractiion included searches of the primary resources establishing maternal nutrient requirements during pregnancy (e.g., Dietary Reference Intakes), and searches of Medline for “maternal nutrition”/ (specific nutrient of interest) and “Birth/pregnancy Outcomes,” focusing mainly on the less extensively reviewed evidence from observational studies of maternal dietary intake and Birth Outcomes. The authors used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors (e.g., baseline maternal nutritional variables) into account when interpreting study findings. The authors conclude that maternal nutrition is a modifiable risk factor of public health importance that can be integrated into efforts to prevent adverse Birth Outcomes, particularly among economically developing/low-income populations.

Bea Van Den Bergh – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • psychosocial stress during pregnancy is related to adverse Birth Outcomes results from a large multi ethnic community based Birth cohort
    European Journal of Public Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Eva M Loomans, Bea Van Den Bergh, Aimee E Van Dijk, Tanja G M Vrijkotte, Manon Van Eijsden, Karien Stronks, Reinoud J B J Gemke

    Abstract:

    Background: Prevalence rates of psychosocial stress during pregnancy are substantial. Evidence for associations between psychosocial stress and Birth Outcomes is inconsistent. This study aims to identify and characterize different clusters of pregnant women, each with a distinct pattern of psychosocial stress, and investigate whether Birth Outcomes differ between these clusters. Methods: Latent class analysis was performed on data of 7740 pregnant women (Amsterdam Born Children and their Development study). Included constructs were depressive symptoms, state anxiety, job strain, pregnancy-related anxiety and parenting stress. Results: Five clusters of women with distinct patterns of psychosocial stress were objectively identified. Babies born from women in the cluster characterized as ‘high depression and high anxiety, moderate job strain’ (12%) had a lower Birth weight, and those in the ‘high depression and high anxiety, not employed’ cluster (15%) had an increased risk of pre-term Birth. Conclusions: Babies from pregnant women reporting both high levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms are at highest risk for adverse Birth Outcomes.

Kathleen Abusaad – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • maternal nutrition and Birth Outcomes
    Epidemiologic Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Kathleen Abusaad, Drora Fraser

    Abstract:

    In this review, the authors summarize current knowledge on material nutritional requirements during pregnancy, with a focus on the nutrients that have been most comonly investigated in association with Birth Outcomes. Data sourcing and extractiion included searches of the primary resources establishing maternal nutrient requirements during pregnancy (e.g., Dietary Reference Intakes), and searches of Medline for “maternal nutrition”/ (specific nutrient of interest) and “Birth/pregnancy Outcomes,” focusing mainly on the less extensively reviewed evidence from observational studies of maternal dietary intake and Birth Outcomes. The authors used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors (e.g., baseline maternal nutritional variables) into account when interpreting study findings. The authors conclude that maternal nutrition is a modifiable risk factor of public health importance that can be integrated into efforts to prevent adverse Birth Outcomes, particularly among economically developing/low-income populations.