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Blood Plasma

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Haisha Zeng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Blood Plasma surface enhanced raman spectroscopy for non invasive optical detection of cervical cancer
    Analyst, 2013
    Co-Authors: Shangyua Feng, Zufang Huang, Guanna Che, Wei Zhang, La Wang, Rong Che, Haisha Zeng

    Abstract:

    Based on Blood Plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis, a simple and label-free Blood test for non-invasive cervical cancer detection is presented in this paper. SERS measurements were performed on Blood Plasma samples from 60 cervical cancer patients and 50 healthy volunteers. Both the empirical approach and multivariate statistical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were employed to analyze and differentiate the obtained Blood Plasma SERS spectra. The empirical diagnostic algorithm based on the integration area of the SERS spectral bands (1310–1430 and 1560–1700 cm−1) achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 70% and 83.3%, and a specificity of 76% and 78%, respectively, whereas the diagnostic algorithms based on PCA-LDA yielded a better diagnostic sensitivity of 96.7% and a specificity of 92% for separating cancerous samples from normal samples. This exploratory work demonstrates that a silver nanoparticle based SERS Plasma analysis technique in conjunction with PCA-LDA has potential for improving cervical cancer detection and screening.

  • gastric cancer detection based on Blood Plasma surface enhanced raman spectroscopy excited by polarized laser light
    Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 2011
    Co-Authors: Shangyua Feng, Rong Che, Jiesi Che, Haisha Zeng

    Abstract:

    We have recently applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for Blood Plasma analysis for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection and obtained good preliminary results. The aim of this study was to develop a more robust SERS spectroscopy based Blood Plasma analysis method for non-invasive gastric cancer detection. The effect of different laser polarizations (non-polarized, linear-polarized, right-handed circularly polarized, and left-handed circularly polarized) on Blood Plasma SERS spectroscopy was explored for the first time. Silver nanoparticles as the SERS-substrate were directly mixed with Blood Plasma to enhance the Raman scattering of various biomolecular constituents. High quality SERS spectra were obtained using a fiber optic probe and a dispersive type near infrared Raman system. Blood Plasma samples from gastric cancer patients (n=32) and healthy subjects (n=33) were analyzed. The diagnostic performance for differentiating gastric cancer Plasma from normal Plasma was evaluated. Principal component analysis combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of the obtained spectral data was used to develop diagnostic algorithms. Classification results obtained from cross-validation of the LDA model based on the four spectral data sets of different laser polarizations demonstrated different diagnostic sensitivities and specificities: 71.9% and 72.7% for non-polarized laser excitation, 75% and 87.9% for linear-polarized laser excitation, 81.3% and 78.8% for right-handed circularly polarized laser excitation, 100% and 97% for left-handed circularly polarized laser excitation. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Plasma SERS spectroscopy with left-handed circularly polarized laser excitation has great promise of becoming a clinically useful diagnostic tool for non-invasive gastric cancer detection.

L D Ziegle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • surface enhanced raman scattering of whole human Blood Blood Plasma and red Blood cells cellular processes and bioanalytical sensing
    Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012
    Co-Authors: W R Premasiri, Joh C Lee, L D Ziegle

    Abstract:

    SERS spectra of whole human Blood, Blood Plasma, and red Blood cells on Au nanoparticle SiO2 substrates excited at 785 nm have been observed. For the sample preparation procedure employed here, the SERS spectrum of whole Blood arises from the Blood Plasma component only. This is in contrast to the normal Raman spectrum of whole Blood excited at 785 nm and open to ambient air, which is exclusively due to the scattering of oxyhemoglobin. The SERS spectrum of whole Blood shows a storage time dependence that is not evident in the non-SERS Raman spectrum of whole Blood. Hypoxanthine, a product of purine degradation, dominates the SERS spectrum of Blood after ∼10–20 h of storage at 8 °C. The corresponding SERS spectrum of Plasma isolated from the stored Blood shows the same temporal release of hypoxanthine. Thus, Blood cellular components (red Blood cells, white Blood cells, and/or platelets) are releasing hypoxanthine into the Plasma over this time interval. The SERS spectrum of red Blood cells (RBCs) excited …

  • surface enhanced raman scattering of whole human Blood Blood Plasma and red Blood cells cellular processes and bioanalytical sensing
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: W R Premasiri, Joh C Lee, L D Ziegle

    Abstract:

    SERS spectra of whole human Blood, Blood Plasma, and red Blood cells on Au nanoparticle SiO₂ substrates excited at 785 nm have been observed. For the sample preparation procedure employed here, the SERS spectrum of whole Blood arises from the Blood Plasma component only. This is in contrast to the normal Raman spectrum of whole Blood excited at 785 nm and open to ambient air, which is exclusively due to the scattering of oxyhemoglobin. The SERS spectrum of whole Blood shows a storage time dependence that is not evident in the non-SERS Raman spectrum of whole Blood. Hypoxanthine, a product of purine degradation, dominates the SERS spectrum of Blood after ∼10–20 h of storage at 8 °C. The corresponding SERS spectrum of Plasma isolated from the stored Blood shows the same temporal release of hypoxanthine. Thus, Blood cellular components (red Blood cells, white Blood cells, and/or platelets) are releasing hypoxanthine into the Plasma over this time interval. The SERS spectrum of red Blood cells (RBCs) excited at 785 nm is reported for the first time and exhibits well-known heme group marker bands as well as other bands that may be attributed to cell membrane components or protein denaturation contributions. SERS, as well as normal Raman spectra, of oxy- and met-RBCs are reported and compared. These SERS results can have significant impact in the area of clinical diagnostics, Blood supply management, and forensics.

Shaoyi Jiang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • functionalizable surface platform with reduced nonspecific protein adsorption from full Blood Plasma material selection and protein immobilization optimization
    Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Hana Vaisocherova, Wei Yang, Zheng Zhang, Gang Cheng, Marek Piliarik, Jiři Homola, Allen D Taylor, Shaoyi Jiang

    Abstract:

    In this work, zwitterionic polymers are investigated as ultra-low fouling and functionalizable coatings for biosensors, nanoparticle-based diagnostics, and microarrays to enable detections in real-world complex media. The effect of the spacer length between the two charged groups on the nonfouling properties of zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (polyCBAA) was studied in Blood Plasma and serum. The polyCBAA polymer with an ethylene spacer was selected for protein immobilization studies. A polyCBAA-coated surface was functionalized with antibodies using a simple and fast amino coupling chemistry for direct protein immobilization in two simple steps: surface activation and protein immobilization/background deactivation. The effect of pH was found to be very important for both steps and it was optimized. The functionalized polyCBAA surface exhibited very low fouling properties even when exposed to undiluted Blood Plasma for more than 6 h with <7 ng/cm2 of adsorbed proteins. The biological activity of the immobilized proteins was demonstrated with the detection of a model protein in undiluted Blood Plasma. A recently developed highly sensitive four-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was used for the evaluation of specific and nonspecific protein adsorption to these surfaces.

  • ultralow fouling and functionalizable surface chemistry based on a zwitterionic polymer enabling sensitive and specific protein detection in undiluted Blood Plasma
    Analytical Chemistry, 2008
    Co-Authors: Hana Vaisocherova, Wei Yang, Zheng Zhang, Zhiqiang Cao, Gang Cheng, Marek Piliarik, Jiři Homola, Shaoyi Jiang

    Abstract:

    A crucial step in the development of implanted medical devices, in vivo diagnostics, and microarrays is the effective prevention of nonspecific protein adsorption from real-world complex media such as Blood Plasma or serum. In this work, a zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (polyCBAA) biomimetic material was employed to create a unique biorecognition coating with an ultralow fouling background, enabling the sensitive and specific detection of proteins in Blood Plasma. Conditions for surface activation, protein immobilization, and surface deactivation of the carboxylate groups in the polyCBAA coating were determined. An antibody-functionalized polyCBAA surface platform was used to detect a target protein in Blood Plasma using a sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. A selective protein was directly detected from 100% human Blood Plasma with extraordinary specificity and sensitivity. The total nonspecific protein adsorption on the functionalized polyCBAA surface was very low (<3 ng/cm2 ...