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Bocavirus

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3732 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Oliver Schildgen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human Bocavirus Can Be Cultured in Differentiated Human Airway
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Ronald Dijkman, Oliver Schildgen, Sylvie M Koekkoek, Richard Molenkamp, Lia Van Der Hoek

    Abstract:

    In 2005, a human Bocavirus was discovered in children with respiratory tract illnesses. Attempts to culture this virus on conventional cell lines has failed thus far. We investigated whether the virus can replicate on pseudostratified human airway epithelium. This cell culture system mimics the human airway environment and facilitates culturing of various respiratory agents. The cells were inoculated with human Bocavirus-positive nasopharyngeal washes from children, and virus replication was monitored by measuring apical release of the virus via real-time PCR. Furthermore, we identified different viral mRNAs in the infected cells. All mRNAs were transcribed from a single promoter but varied due to alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation, similar to what has been described for bovine parvovirus and minute virus of canines, the other two members of the Bocavirus genus. Thus, transcription of human Bocavirus displays strong homology to the transcription of the other Bocaviruses. In conclusion, we report here for the first time that human Bocavirus can be propagated in an in vitro culture system and present a detailed map of the set of mRNAs that are produced by the virus.

  • the human Bocavirus is associated with some lung and colorectal cancers and persists in solid tumors
    PLOS ONE, 2013
    Co-Authors: Verena Schildgen, Monika Malecki, Ramonaliza Tillmann, Michael Brockmann, Oliver Schildgen

    Abstract:

    Human Bocavirus is the second autonomous human parvovirus with assumed pathogenic potential. Other parvoviruses are known to persist and even integrate into the host genome, eventually contributing to the multi-step development of cancer. Human Bocavirus also persists in an unknown percentage of clinically asymptomatic patients in addition to those with primary infection. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of Human Bocavirus in lung and colorectal cancers. Therefore, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, archived tumor samples were screened for Human Bocavirus DNA by PCR, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Positive tissues were further subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis to specifically detect human Bocavirus DNA in the infected cells. In total, 11 of the 60 (18.3%) lung and 9 of the 44 (20.5%) colorectal tumors tested positive for human Bocavirus DNA by PCR and were confirmed by sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Thus, human Bocavirus DNA is present in the nuclei of infected cells, in either single or multiple copies, and appears to form concatemers. The occurrence of these human Bocavirus DNA structures supports the existence of the postulated σ- or rolling-hairpin replication mechanism. Moreover, the fluorescence in situ hybridization patterns inspired the hypothesis that human Bocavirus DNA either persists as cccDNA or is integrated into the host genome. This finding suggests that this virus may indirectly contribute to the development of some colorectal and lung cancers, as do other DNA viruses, such as the human hepatitis B virus, or may play an active role in cancer by interacting with the host genome.

  • severe human Bocavirus infection germany
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Walter Korner, Monika Malecki, Maria Soderlundvenermo, Silke Van Koningsbruggenrietschel, Rolf Kaiser, Oliver Schildgen

    Abstract:

    Human Bocavirus (HBoV), discovered in 2005, can cause respiratory disease or no symptoms at all. We confi rmed HBoV infection in an 8-month-old girl with hypoxia, respiratory distress, wheezing, cough, and fever. This case demonstrates that lower respiratory tract infection caused by HBoV can lead to severe and life-threatening disease.

Tobias Allander – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • life threatening respiratory tract disease with human Bocavirus 1 infection in a 4 year old child
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Niklas Edner, Paul Castillorodas, Lars Falk, Klaus Hedman, Maria Soderlundvenermo, Tobias Allander

    Abstract:

    The disease spectrum associated with human Bocavirus-1 infection remains to be fully defined. We report a case of Bocavirus-1-associated bronchiolitis, leading to severe respiratory failure and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a 4-year-old child, and suggest blood testing for human Bocavirus-1 in children with severe respiratory tract infection.

  • human Bocavirus the first 5 years
    Reviews in Medical Virology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tuomas Jartti, Tobias Allander, Klaus Hedman, Olli Ruuskanen, Laura Jartti, Maria Soderlundvenermo

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY

    Four species of human Bocavirus (HBoV) have been recently discovered and classified in the Bocavirus genus (family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae). Although detected both in respiratory and stool samples worldwide, HBoV1 is predominantly a respiratory pathogen, whereas HBoV2, HBoV3, and HBoV4 have been found mainly in stool. A variety of signs and symptoms have been described in patients with HBoV infection including rhinitis, pharyngitis, cough, dyspnea, wheezing, pneumonia, acute otitis media, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many of these potential manifestations have not been systematically explored, and they have been questioned because of high HBoV co-infection rates in symptomatic subjects and high HBoV detection rates in asymptomatic subjects. However, evidence is mounting to show that HBoV1 is an important cause of lower respiratory tract illness. The best currently available diagnostic approaches are quantitative PCR and serology. This concise review summarizes the current clinical knowledge on HBoV species. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Human Bocavirus—the first 5 years
    Reviews in Medical Virology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Tuomas Jartti, Tobias Allander, Klaus Hedman, Olli Ruuskanen, Laura Jartti, Maria Söderlund-venermo

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY

    Four species of human Bocavirus (HBoV) have been recently discovered and classified in the Bocavirus genus (family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae). Although detected both in respiratory and stool samples worldwide, HBoV1 is predominantly a respiratory pathogen, whereas HBoV2, HBoV3, and HBoV4 have been found mainly in stool. A variety of signs and symptoms have been described in patients with HBoV infection including rhinitis, pharyngitis, cough, dyspnea, wheezing, pneumonia, acute otitis media, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many of these potential manifestations have not been systematically explored, and they have been questioned because of high HBoV co-infection rates in symptomatic subjects and high HBoV detection rates in asymptomatic subjects. However, evidence is mounting to show that HBoV1 is an important cause of lower respiratory tract illness. The best currently available diagnostic approaches are quantitative PCR and serology. This concise review summarizes the current clinical knowledge on HBoV species. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Zhao-jun Duan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human Bocavirus Infection, People’s Republic of China
    Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xiaowang Qu, Zhao-jun Duan, Can-ping Huang, Zhengyu Qi, Fuwang Peng, Lishu Zheng

    Abstract:

    A newly identified parvovirus, human Bocavirus (HBoV), was found in 21 (8.3%) of 252 nasopharyngeal aspirates from hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection in Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China. Viral loads were 104 to 1010 copies/mL. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene showed a single genetic lineage of HBoV worldwide.

  • Identification and characterization of porcine Bocavirus episomes
    Chinese journal of virology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Wan-zhu Yang, Can-ping Huang, Zhao-jun Duan

    Abstract:

    To verify that the circular forms of Bocavirus genome exist in their host, Bocavirus episomes were detected in fecal samples of healthy piglets using a semi-nested PCR method. Two species of porcine Bocaviruses (PBoVG2-episome and PBoVG3-episome) were identified for the first time. The relevant terminal sequences of the noncoding region (405 and 511 nt, respectively) were also obtained. Sequence analyses and secondary structure prediction indicated that the PBoVG2-episome was more similar to that of human Bocavirus 3 (HBoV3) but the PBoVG3-episome was quite different from that of other members of the genus Bocavirus. Discovery of episomal forms of porcine Bocaviruses (PBoV) suggested that PBoV, like HBoV, used a different replication mechanism from other parvoviruses. The sequencing of episome Inverted Terminal Repeats (ITRs) also contributes to a possible alternative strategy for constructing infectious molecular clones of Bocavirus in a future study.

  • phylogenetic and recombination analysis of human Bocavirus 2
    BMC Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Can-ping Huang, Zi-qian Xu, Weixia Cheng, Jinan Chen, Jiemei Yu, Huiying Li, Ming Zhang, Zhao-jun Duan

    Abstract:

    Human Bocavirus 2(HBoV2) and other human Bocavirus species (HBoV, HBoV3, and HBoV4) have been discovered recently. But the precise phylogenetic relationships among these viruses are not clear yet. We collected 632 diarrhea and 162 healthy children in Lanzhou, China. Using PCR, Human Bocavirus (HBoV), HBoV2, HBoV3 and HBoV4 were screened. The partial genes of NS, NP1 and VP, and two nearly complete sequences of HBoV2 were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed the different genes of HBoV2 strain were homogenous with different reference strains. HBoV3 may be a recombinant derived from HBoV and HBoV4. We also observed that the VP1 and VP2 region of HBoV3 is as similar to HBoV2 as to HBoV4. A single genetic lineage of HBoV2 is circulating in children with and without gastroenteritis in Lanzhou, China. Current evidence in this study was not enough to support recombination between HBoV2 strains, and HBoV3 may be a recombinant between HBoV and the common ancestor of HBoV2 and HBoV4.