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Body Weight Gain

The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Nigel P. Shankley – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • retracted obestatin reduces food intake and suppresses Body Weight Gain in rodents
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2007
    Co-Authors: Guy Lagaud, Andy Young, Auzon Acena, Magda F Morton, Terrance D Barrett, Nigel P. Shankley

    Abstract:

    Obestatin was recently described as a bioactive peptide encoded for by the same gene as ghrelin but with opposite actions on food intake. Although some groups have confirmed these findings others find no effect. We investigated the effect of obestatin on feeding in rodents over a wide range of doses. Acute administration of obestatin inhibited feeding at doses of 10-100 nmol/kg i.p. in mice and 100-300 nmol/kg i.p. in lean and Zucker fatty rats. Interestingly, the dose-response relationship was U-shaped such that both low and high doses were without effect in either species. Treatment of mice with obestatin over a 7-day period decreased Body Weight Gain and food consumption. Overall, obestatin suppressed food intake and Body Weight Gain in rodent and an unusual dose-response relationship was found. These findings may explain the difficulties in reproducing the effects of obestatin on feeding reported by some groups.

Guy Lagaud – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • retracted obestatin reduces food intake and suppresses Body Weight Gain in rodents
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2007
    Co-Authors: Guy Lagaud, Andy Young, Auzon Acena, Magda F Morton, Terrance D Barrett, Nigel P. Shankley

    Abstract:

    Obestatin was recently described as a bioactive peptide encoded for by the same gene as ghrelin but with opposite actions on food intake. Although some groups have confirmed these findings others find no effect. We investigated the effect of obestatin on feeding in rodents over a wide range of doses. Acute administration of obestatin inhibited feeding at doses of 10-100 nmol/kg i.p. in mice and 100-300 nmol/kg i.p. in lean and Zucker fatty rats. Interestingly, the dose-response relationship was U-shaped such that both low and high doses were without effect in either species. Treatment of mice with obestatin over a 7-day period decreased Body Weight Gain and food consumption. Overall, obestatin suppressed food intake and Body Weight Gain in rodent and an unusual dose-response relationship was found. These findings may explain the difficulties in reproducing the effects of obestatin on feeding reported by some groups.

Daniele Piomelli – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • synthesis and characterization of a peripherally restricted cb1 cannabinoid antagonist urb447 that reduces feeding and Body Weight Gain in mice
    Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jesse Loverme, Daniele Piomelli, Andrea Duranti, Andrea Tontini, Gilberto Spadoni, Silvia Rivara, Nephi Stella, Cong Xu, Giorgio Tarzia

    Abstract:

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists reduce Body Weight in rodents and humans, but their clinical utility as anti-obesity agents is limited by centrally mediated side effects. Here, we describe the first mixed CB1 antagonist/CB2 agonist, URB447 ([4-amino-1-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl](phenyl)methanone), which lowers food intake and BodyWeight Gain in mice without entering the brain or antagonizing central CB1-dependent responses. URB447 may provide a useful pharmacological tool for investigating the cannabinoid system, and might serve as a starting point for developing clinically viable CB1 antagonists devoid of central side effects.