Rodents - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Rodents

The Experts below are selected from a list of 462693 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Rodents – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Carine Brouat – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in commensal Rodents sampled across Senegal, West Africa
    Parasite, 2018
    Co-Authors: Carine Brouat, Christophe Amidi Diagne, Khadija Ismaïl, Abdelkrim Aroussi, Ambroise Dalecky, Mamadou Kane, Youssoupha Niang, Mamoudou Diallo, Aliou Sow, Lokman Galal
    Abstract:

    Risks related to Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans remain poorly known in Senegal. Although rodent surveys could help to assess the circulation of T. gondii, they have seldom been set up in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to examine Toxoplasma seroprevalence in Rodents from villages and towns across Senegal. Rodents were sampled in 40 localities using a standardised trapping protocol. Detection of T. gondii antibodies was performed on 1205 Rodents, using a modified agglutination test (MAT) technique. Seroprevalence data were analysed depending on geography, the local rodent community, and individual characteristics of the rodent hosts. We found 44 seropositive Rodents from four different species (Mastomys erythroleucus, Mastomys natalensis, Mus musculus domesticus, Rattus rattus). Toxoplasma seroprevalence was low, averaging 4% in the localities. Higher Toxoplasma seroprevalence (up to 24%) was found in northern Senegal, a region known to be the heart of pastoral herding in the country.

  • Serological Survey of Zoonotic Viruses in Invasive and Native Commensal Rodents in Senegal, West Africa
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2017
    Co-Authors: Christophe Amidi Diagne, Nathalie Charbonnel, Heikki Henttonen, Tarja Sironen, Carine Brouat
    Abstract:

    Increasing studies on rodent-borne diseases still highlight the major role of Rodents as reservoirs of numerous zoonoses of which the frequency is likely to increase worldwide as a result of accelerated anthropogenic changes, including biological invasions. Such a situation makes pathogen detection in rodent populations important, especially in the context of developing countries characterized by high infectious disease burden. Here, we used indirect fluorescent antibody tests to describe the circulation of potentially zoonotic viruses in both invasive (Mus musculus domesticus and Rattus rattus) and native (Mastomys erythroleucus and Mastomys natalensis) murine rodent populations in Senegal (West Africa). Of the 672 Rodents tested, we reported 22 seropositive tests for Hantavirus, Orthopoxvirus, and Mammarenavirus genera, and no evidence of viral coinfection. This study is the first to report serological detection of Orthopoxvirus in Rodents from Senegal, Mammarenavirus in R. rattus from Africa, and Hantavirus in M. m. domesticus and in M. erythroleucus. Further specific identification of the viral agents highlighted here is urgently needed for crucial public health concerns.

Serge Morand – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Progress on research on Rodents and rodent-borne zoonoses in South-east Asia
    Wildlife Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: Kim R. Blasdell, Frédéric Bordes, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Jean-françois Cosson, Alice Latinne, Johan Michaux, Serge Morand, Marie Pagès
    Abstract:

    This review aims to synthesise knowledge regarding the taxonomy of South-east Asian murine Rodents and the challenges associated with the identification of habitat preferences and associated rodent-borne diseases. Recent studies concerning the Rattini tribe have identified unclear species boundaries that would benefit from further investigation. The development of barcoding may allow more accurate identification of Rodents, specifically for complex species. However, knowledge on the distribution and habitat specialisations of many common murine Rodents is still scarce, particularly regarding the specific habitat preferences of most synanthropic rodent species (Rattus tanezumi or Rattus exulans). Several studies have analysed the prevalence of major rodent-borne diseases in South-east Asia and it appears that the greatest risk of rodent zoonoses are in the lowland rain-fed and irrigated landscapes, generally in and around rice fields.

  • Assessing the distribution of disease-bearing Rodents in human-modified tropical landscapes
    Journal of Applied Ecology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Serge Morand, Frédéric Bordes, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Jean-françois Cosson, Kim Blasdell, Shai Pilosof, Jean-françois Cornu, Tristan Feyfant
    Abstract:

    * We tested how habitat structure and fragmentation affect the spatial distribution of common murine Rodents inhabiting human-dominated landscapes in South-East Asia. The spatial distribution patterns observed for each rodent species were then used to assess how changes in habitat structure may potentially affect the risk of several major rodent-borne diseases. * For this analysis, we used an extensive geo-referenced data base containing details of Rodents trapped from seven sites in Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR. We also developed land-cover layers for each site. Results from published studies that screened for five major rodent-borne pathogens in Rodents were used to estimate how these pathogens would likely be impacted by these alterations in habitat structure and composition. * Our results confirmed the specialist and/or synanthropic status of several rodent species, although the majority of species studied demonstrated some degree of low level of habitat specialization. * Habitat diversity and its alteration (decreasing forest cover, increasing fragmentation, increasing urbanization) were found to favour the presence of synanthropic rodent species such as Rattus tanezumi, known to damage crops and host important rodent-borne diseases. * Synthesis and applications. The five major rodent-borne pathogens were linked to ongoing changes in habitat structure. In particular, the presence of Bartonella spp. and hantaviruses seemed to be favoured in wooded landscapes affected by ongoing fragmentation and human encroachments. Rodents also pose significant problems for crop production in South-East Asia. Our results showed that the structure of the landscape affects the likely presence of rodent species considered as agricultural pests. The patchy structure of a landscape can either enhance, such as B. indica, or decrease, such as B. savilei, the presence of Rodents that may cause serious damage to crops.

  • Epidemiology of leptospira transmitted by Rodents in southeast Asia.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jean-françois Cosson, Yannick Chaval, Vincent Herbreteau, Sathaporn Jittapalapong, Philippe Buchy, Mathieu Picardeau, Mathilde Mielcarek, Caroline Tatard, Yupin Suputtamongkol, Serge Morand
    Abstract:

    Leptospirosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses and has been identified as an important emerging global public health problem in Southeast Asia. Rodents are important reservoirs for human leptospirosis, but epidemiological data is lacking. We sampled Rodents living in different habitats from seven localities distributed across Southeast Asia (Thailand, Lao PDR and Cambodia), between 2009 to 2010. Human isolates were also obtained from localities close to where Rodents were sampled. The prevalence of Leptospira infection was assessed by real-time PCR using DNA extracted from rodent kidneys, targeting the lipL32 gene. Sequencing rrs and secY genes, and Multi Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analyses were performed on DNA extracted from rat kidneys for Leptospira isolates molecular typing. Four species were detected in Rodents, L. borgpetersenii (56% of positive samples), L. interrogans (36%), L. kirschneri (3%) and L. weilli (2%), which were identical to human isolates. Mean prevalence in Rodents was approximately 7%, and largely varied across localities and habitats, but not between rodent species. The two most abundant Leptospira species displayed different habitat requirements: L. interrogans was linked to humid habitats (rice fields and forests) while L. borgpetersenii was abundant in both humid and dry habitats (non-floodable lands). L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii species are widely distributed amongst rodent populations, and strain typing confirmed Rodents as reservoirs for human leptospirosis. Differences in habitat requirements for L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii supported differential transmission modes. In Southeast Asia, human infection risk is not only restricted to activities taking place in wetlands and rice fields as is commonly accepted, but should also include tasks such as forestry work, as well as the hunting and preparation of Rodents for consumption, which deserve more attention in future epidemiological studies.

Christophe Amidi Diagne – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in commensal Rodents sampled across Senegal, West Africa
    Parasite, 2018
    Co-Authors: Carine Brouat, Christophe Amidi Diagne, Khadija Ismaïl, Abdelkrim Aroussi, Ambroise Dalecky, Mamadou Kane, Youssoupha Niang, Mamoudou Diallo, Aliou Sow, Lokman Galal
    Abstract:

    Risks related to Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans remain poorly known in Senegal. Although rodent surveys could help to assess the circulation of T. gondii, they have seldom been set up in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to examine Toxoplasma seroprevalence in Rodents from villages and towns across Senegal. Rodents were sampled in 40 localities using a standardised trapping protocol. Detection of T. gondii antibodies was performed on 1205 Rodents, using a modified agglutination test (MAT) technique. Seroprevalence data were analysed depending on geography, the local rodent community, and individual characteristics of the rodent hosts. We found 44 seropositive Rodents from four different species (Mastomys erythroleucus, Mastomys natalensis, Mus musculus domesticus, Rattus rattus). Toxoplasma seroprevalence was low, averaging 4% in the localities. Higher Toxoplasma seroprevalence (up to 24%) was found in northern Senegal, a region known to be the heart of pastoral herding in the country.

  • Serological Survey of Zoonotic Viruses in Invasive and Native Commensal Rodents in Senegal, West Africa
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2017
    Co-Authors: Christophe Amidi Diagne, Nathalie Charbonnel, Heikki Henttonen, Tarja Sironen, Carine Brouat
    Abstract:

    Increasing studies on rodent-borne diseases still highlight the major role of Rodents as reservoirs of numerous zoonoses of which the frequency is likely to increase worldwide as a result of accelerated anthropogenic changes, including biological invasions. Such a situation makes pathogen detection in rodent populations important, especially in the context of developing countries characterized by high infectious disease burden. Here, we used indirect fluorescent antibody tests to describe the circulation of potentially zoonotic viruses in both invasive (Mus musculus domesticus and Rattus rattus) and native (Mastomys erythroleucus and Mastomys natalensis) murine rodent populations in Senegal (West Africa). Of the 672 Rodents tested, we reported 22 seropositive tests for Hantavirus, Orthopoxvirus, and Mammarenavirus genera, and no evidence of viral coinfection. This study is the first to report serological detection of Orthopoxvirus in Rodents from Senegal, Mammarenavirus in R. rattus from Africa, and Hantavirus in M. m. domesticus and in M. erythroleucus. Further specific identification of the viral agents highlighted here is urgently needed for crucial public health concerns.