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Booster Station

The Experts below are selected from a list of 204 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Carl D Laird – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of chlorine Booster Station placement for water security
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Arpan Seth, Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Terranna Haxton, Regan Murray, Carl D Laird, Katherine A Klise

    Abstract:

    Abstract Drinking water utilities use Booster Stations to maintain chlorine residuals throughout water distribution systems. Booster Stations could also be used as part of an emergency response plan to minimize health risks in the event of an unintentional or malicious contamination incident. The benefit of Booster Stations for emergency response depends on several factors, including the reaction between chlorine and an unknown contaminant species, the fate and transport of the contaminant in the water distribution system, and the time delay between detection and initiation of boosted levels of chlorine. This paper takes these aspects into account and proposes a mixed-integer linear program formulation for optimizing the placement of Booster Stations for emergency response. A case study is used to explore the ability of optimally placed Booster Stations to reduce the impact of contamination in water distribution systems.

  • efficient reduction of optimal disinfectant Booster Station placement formulations for security of large scale water distribution networks
    Engineering Optimization, 2017
    Co-Authors: Arpan Seth, Katherine A Klise, Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Terranna Haxton, Regan Murray, Carl D Laird

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTIn response to a contamination incident in water distribution networks, disinfectant Booster Stations can be used to neutralize the contaminant and protect the public. In this paper, two mixed-integer linear programming formulations are proposed for optimal placement of disinfectant Booster Stations. The first formulation minimizes the contaminant mass consumed by the public, while the second formulation minimizes the number of people who ingest the contaminant above a mass threshold. The proposed formulations consider uncertainty in both the location and time of the contamination incident, resulting in an intractably large stochastic programming problem. This manuscript proposes a series of reductions that decrease the size of the problem by up to five orders of magnitude. The results show that the use of a small number of disinfectant Booster Stations can be very effective as a response strategy.

  • a stochastic programming formulation for disinfectant Booster Station placement to protect large scale water distribution systems
    Computer-aided chemical engineering, 2012
    Co-Authors: Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Katherine A Klise, Angelica Mann, William E Hart, Carl D Laird

    Abstract:

    Abstract We present a methodology for optimally locating disinfectant Booster Stations for response to contamination events in water distribution systems. A stochastic programming problem considering uncertainty in both the location and time of the contamination event is formulated resulting in an extensive form that is equivalent to the weighted maximum coverage problem. Although the original full-space problem is intractably large, we show a series of reductions that reduce the size of the problem by five orders of magnitude and allow solutions of the optimal placement problem for realistically sized water network models.

B. Guidry – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Power quality concerns and solutions
    IEEE Industry Applications Magazine, 2005
    Co-Authors: R. Ellis, B. Guidry

    Abstract:

    The pipeline project discussed in this article involved building a new 70-m, 24-in diameter section of a petroleum products pipeline stretch and investigates power issues on a 2,500-hp pipeline Booster Station adjustable frequency drive. AFDs were originally intended only to be for soft starting, not for continuous use. The active front-end topology uses PWM switching of the rectifier, as well as a reactor/capacitor on the input, to limit harmonics being generated back in to power system.

  • Power quality concerns/solutions on a 2500 HP pipeline Booster Station adjustable frequency drive
    IEEE Industry Applications Society 50th Annual Petroleum and Chemical Industry Conference 2003. Record of Conference Papers., 2003
    Co-Authors: R. Ellis, B. Guidry

    Abstract:

    This paper details power quality issues that arose on a utility power system related to a 2500 HP medium voltage, adjustable frequency drive (AFD) on a refined petroleum products pipeline Booster Station. Most recently manufactured medium voltage drives employ the use of higher pulse number rectifiers to achieve harmonic reduction and this AFD was no exception. An overview of the computer based modeling analysis that was undertaken to help solve the power quality concerns is presented. Harmonic measurements taken before and after additional mitigation was implemented are provided. The contributing factors in why these issues arose are identified. Criteria to help recognize when harmonic modeling should be carried out at the design stage are established.

Katherine A Klise – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of chlorine Booster Station placement for water security
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Arpan Seth, Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Terranna Haxton, Regan Murray, Carl D Laird, Katherine A Klise

    Abstract:

    Abstract Drinking water utilities use Booster Stations to maintain chlorine residuals throughout water distribution systems. Booster Stations could also be used as part of an emergency response plan to minimize health risks in the event of an unintentional or malicious contamination incident. The benefit of Booster Stations for emergency response depends on several factors, including the reaction between chlorine and an unknown contaminant species, the fate and transport of the contaminant in the water distribution system, and the time delay between detection and initiation of boosted levels of chlorine. This paper takes these aspects into account and proposes a mixed-integer linear program formulation for optimizing the placement of Booster Stations for emergency response. A case study is used to explore the ability of optimally placed Booster Stations to reduce the impact of contamination in water distribution systems.

  • efficient reduction of optimal disinfectant Booster Station placement formulations for security of large scale water distribution networks
    Engineering Optimization, 2017
    Co-Authors: Arpan Seth, Katherine A Klise, Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Terranna Haxton, Regan Murray, Carl D Laird

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTIn response to a contamination incident in water distribution networks, disinfectant Booster Stations can be used to neutralize the contaminant and protect the public. In this paper, two mixed-integer linear programming formulations are proposed for optimal placement of disinfectant Booster Stations. The first formulation minimizes the contaminant mass consumed by the public, while the second formulation minimizes the number of people who ingest the contaminant above a mass threshold. The proposed formulations consider uncertainty in both the location and time of the contamination incident, resulting in an intractably large stochastic programming problem. This manuscript proposes a series of reductions that decrease the size of the problem by up to five orders of magnitude. The results show that the use of a small number of disinfectant Booster Stations can be very effective as a response strategy.

  • a stochastic programming formulation for disinfectant Booster Station placement to protect large scale water distribution systems
    Computer-aided chemical engineering, 2012
    Co-Authors: Gaberiel A Hackebeil, Katherine A Klise, Angelica Mann, William E Hart, Carl D Laird

    Abstract:

    Abstract We present a methodology for optimally locating disinfectant Booster Stations for response to contamination events in water distribution systems. A stochastic programming problem considering uncertainty in both the location and time of the contamination event is formulated resulting in an extensive form that is equivalent to the weighted maximum coverage problem. Although the original full-space problem is intractably large, we show a series of reductions that reduce the size of the problem by five orders of magnitude and allow solutions of the optimal placement problem for realistically sized water network models.