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Botfly

The Experts below are selected from a list of 303 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Abdullah Algarni – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • conjunctival ophthalmomyiasis caused by the sheep nasal Botfly oestrus ovis
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 1991
    Co-Authors: James A. Cameron, Nader M Shoukrey, Abdullah Algarni

    Abstract:

    Three patients had conjunctival ophthalmomyiasis caused by the ovine nasal Botfly. All patients had a sudden onset of redness, tearing, and foreign-body sensation of the affected eye. One to nine Oestrus ovis first-instar larvae were removed from the bulbar or palpebral conjunctiva of each patient. Symptoms and clinical signs resolved after mechanical removal of the larvae. Specific taxonomic diagnosis of O. ovis larvae was determined on the basis of characteristic conformation of the terminal end of the larval caudal segment as seen by use of light microscopy.

Juan C Reboreda – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • brood parasitic nestlings benefit from unusual host defenses against Botfly larvae philornis spp
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Cynthia A. Ursino, M. C. Mársico, Juan C Reboreda

    Abstract:

    Brood parasitic birds lay their eggs into the nests of other birds, abandoning parental care of their nestlings to the unsuspecting hosts. Parasite and host nestlings may themselves be parasitized by Botfly larvae (Philornis: Muscidae), which burrow under the nestlings’ skin and can seriously affect growth and survival. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings (Agelaioides badius), the primary host of the specialist brood parasitic screaming cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris), regularly remove Botfly larvae from their own and parasitic nestlings by pulling them out of the nestlings’ skin. This is the only bird species known to remove Botfly larvae. By combining nestling cross-fostering with video recording of baywing nests, we show that due to prompt removal, infection with Botfly larvae had negligible effects on nestling growth and survival despite high prevalence. Our results provide the first direct observations for larva removal behavior in Botfly hosts. Screaming cowbirds may benefit from using baywings as its main host, as larva removal by adult baywings reduces the costs of Botfly parasitism. Infection by Botfly larvae of the genus Philornis (Muscidae) causes nestling mortality in many Neotropical birds. Despite the lethal effects, most Philornis hosts studied so far lack specific defenses against these larvae. The grayish baywing (Agelaioides badius), primary host of the brood parasitic screaming cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris), is the only species that, based on indirect evidence, would be able to remove Philornis larvae from infected nestlings. We provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings do indeed remove Botfly larvae from their own nestlings as well as from parasitic cowbird nestlings and that this unusual defense may increase the survival of own and screaming cowbird nestlings at infected nests.

  • Host use by botflies Philornis sp. in a passerine community of the Espinal forest in Argentina
    Revista Mexicana De Biodiversidad, 2013
    Co-Authors: Martin Anibal Quiroga, Juan C Reboreda, Adolfo H. Beltzer

    Abstract:

    We studied host use by parasitic botflies (Philornis sp.) in a passerine community of the Espinal forest in Argentina and analyzed characteristics of nests and hosts associated with Botfly parasitism. For each species we determined: presence of Botfly parasitism, type of nest, presence of green material and small sticks in the nest, average height of the nest, date of last nesting attempt during the breeding season, and egg volume (as a surrogate of species body mass). A four-year study of three birds species nesting in boxes in the same place showed that botflies parasitized Troglodytes aedon (25% of nests), but not Sicalis flaveola and Tachycineta leucorroha. The analysis of data of 35 analyzed species showed a negative association between Botfly parasitism and presence of green material in the nest, and a positive association between Botfly parasitism and presence of small sticks in the nest and date of the last nesting attempt during the breeding season. Our results indicate that the materials used to build the nest and the extent of the breeding season are factors that influence host use by botflies in the Espinal forest.

  • lethal and sublethal effects of Botfly philornis seguyi parasitism on house wren nestlings
    The Condor, 2012
    Co-Authors: Martin Anibal Quiroga, Juan C Reboreda

    Abstract:

    Abstract. We studied the effect of Botfly (Philornis seguyi) parasitism on survival and growth of House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) nestlings. We investigated whether nestling survival was related to (1) the intensity of Botfly infestation, (2) age of the nestling at the time it was parasitized, and (3) the order in which a chick hatched within a brood. The prevalence of Botfly parasitism was 25%; the mean intensity and age at parasitism were 12.8 larvae per nestling and 3.9 days, respectively. Nestling survival was 42% lower in infested than in noninfested broods. Nestling survival was negatively associated with the mean intensity of parasitism of the brood and positively associated with the age of the nestling at the time it was parasitized. Within infested broods, nestling survival was higher in chicks hatched first than in chicks hatched last. Infested nestlings that survived until fledging grew at lower rates and remained in the nest longer than did nestlings in noninfested broods. Our results reveal th…

Cynthia A. Ursino – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Brood parasitic nestlings benefit from unusual host defenses against Botfly larvae (Philornis spp.)
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Cynthia A. Ursino, M. C. Mársico, J. C. Reboreda

    Abstract:

    Brood parasitic birds lay their eggs into the nests of other birds, abandoning parental care of their nestlings to the unsuspecting hosts. Parasite and host nestlings may themselves be parasitized by Botfly larvae ( Philornis : Muscidae), which burrow under the nestlings’ skin and can seriously affect growth and survival. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings ( Agelaioides badius ), the primary host of the specialist brood parasitic screaming cowbird ( Molothrus rufoaxillaris ), regularly remove Botfly larvae from their own and parasitic nestlings by pulling them out of the nestlings’ skin. This is the only bird species known to remove Botfly larvae. By combining nestling cross-fostering with video recording of baywing nests, we show that due to prompt removal, infection with Botfly larvae had negligible effects on nestling growth and survival despite high prevalence. Our results provide the first direct observations for larva removal behavior in Botfly hosts. Screaming cowbirds may benefit from using baywings as its main host, as larva removal by adult baywings reduces the costs of Botfly parasitism. Significance statement Infection by Botfly larvae of the genus Philornis (Muscidae) causes nestling mortality in many Neotropical birds. Despite the lethal effects, most Philornis hosts studied so far lack specific defenses against these larvae. The grayish baywing ( Agelaioides badius ), primary host of the brood parasitic screaming cowbird ( Molothrus rufoaxillaris ), is the only species that, based on indirect evidence, would be able to remove Philornis larvae from infected nestlings. We provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings do indeed remove Botfly larvae from their own nestlings as well as from parasitic cowbird nestlings and that this unusual defense may increase the survival of own and screaming cowbird nestlings at infected nests.

  • brood parasitic nestlings benefit from unusual host defenses against Botfly larvae philornis spp
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Cynthia A. Ursino, M. C. Mársico, Juan C Reboreda

    Abstract:

    Brood parasitic birds lay their eggs into the nests of other birds, abandoning parental care of their nestlings to the unsuspecting hosts. Parasite and host nestlings may themselves be parasitized by Botfly larvae (Philornis: Muscidae), which burrow under the nestlings’ skin and can seriously affect growth and survival. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings (Agelaioides badius), the primary host of the specialist brood parasitic screaming cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris), regularly remove Botfly larvae from their own and parasitic nestlings by pulling them out of the nestlings’ skin. This is the only bird species known to remove Botfly larvae. By combining nestling cross-fostering with video recording of baywing nests, we show that due to prompt removal, infection with Botfly larvae had negligible effects on nestling growth and survival despite high prevalence. Our results provide the first direct observations for larva removal behavior in Botfly hosts. Screaming cowbirds may benefit from using baywings as its main host, as larva removal by adult baywings reduces the costs of Botfly parasitism. Infection by Botfly larvae of the genus Philornis (Muscidae) causes nestling mortality in many Neotropical birds. Despite the lethal effects, most Philornis hosts studied so far lack specific defenses against these larvae. The grayish baywing (Agelaioides badius), primary host of the brood parasitic screaming cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris), is the only species that, based on indirect evidence, would be able to remove Philornis larvae from infected nestlings. We provide the first direct evidence that adult baywings do indeed remove Botfly larvae from their own nestlings as well as from parasitic cowbird nestlings and that this unusual defense may increase the survival of own and screaming cowbird nestlings at infected nests.