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Bovine Respiratory Disease

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3516 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sebastien Buczinski – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis: What Progress Has Been Made in Clinical Diagnosis?
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sebastien Buczinski, Bart Pardon

    Abstract:

    Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) complex is a worldwide health problem in cattle and is a major reason for antimicrobial use in young cattle. Several challenges may explain why it is difficult to make progress in the management of this Disease. This article defines the limitation of BRD complex nomenclature, which may not easily distinguish upper versus lower Respiratory tract infection and infectious bronchopneumonia versus other types of Respiratory Diseases. It then discusses the obstacles to clinical diagnosis and reviews the current knowledge of readily available diagnostic test to reach a diagnosis of infectious bronchopneumonia.

  • Bovine Respiratory Disease diagnosis what progress has been made in infectious diagnosis
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: Bart Pardon, Sebastien Buczinski

    Abstract:

    When it is desired to identify infectious agents involved in an outbreak of Bovine Respiratory Disease, a variety of possible sampling methods may be used. For field use, the deep nasopharyngeal swab, transtracheal wash, and nonendoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage are most feasible. At present, bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction testing are most commonly used to identify infectious agents. Interpretation of test results can be challenging, particularly for opportunistic pathogens. Evidence-based guidelines for precise interpretation of microbiologic tests results are lacking; however, approaches that have been practically useful for the management of Bovine Respiratory Disease outbreaks are presented.

  • on farm use of ultrasonography for Bovine Respiratory Disease
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: T L Ollivett, Sebastien Buczinski

    Abstract:

    : Thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) in young cattle has recently gained momentum as an accurate and practical tool for identifying the lung lesions associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease. As cattle producers increasingly seek input from their veterinarians on Respiratory health issues, Bovine practitioners should consider adding TUS to their practice models. This article discusses the relevant literature regarding TUS in young cattle, current acceptable techniques, and practical on-farm applications.

Robert W Fulton – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Viruses in Bovine Respiratory Disease in North America: Knowledge Advances Using Genomic Testing
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: Robert W Fulton

    Abstract:

    Advances in viral detection in Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) have resulted from advances in viral sequencing of Respiratory tract samples. New viruses detected include influenza D virus, Bovine coronavirus, Bovine rhinitis A, Bovine rhinitis B virus, and others. Serosurveys demonstrate widespread presence of some of these viruses in North American cattle. These viruses sometimes cause Disease after animal challenge, and some have been found in BRD cases more frequently than in healthy cattle. Continued work is needed to develop reagents for identification of new viruses, to confirm their pathogenicity, and to determine whether vaccines have a place in their control.

  • Effectiveness of sorting calves with high risk of developing Bovine Respiratory Disease on the basis of serum haptoglobin concentration at the time of arrival at a feedlot
    American Journal of Veterinary Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: B. P. Holland, Robert W Fulton, Douglas L. Step, L. O. Burciaga-robles, Anthony W. Confer, Trista K. Rose, Lindsay E. Laidig, C. J. Richards, C R Krehbiel

    Abstract:

    Objective—To evaluate serum haptoglobin concentration at feedlot arrival and subsequent performance and morbidity and mortality rates of calves that developed Bovine Respiratory Disease. Animals—360 heifer calves and 416 steer and bull calves. Procedures—Serum samples were obtained from cattle at the time of arrival to a feedlot (day −1) and analyzed for haptoglobin concentration. In experiment 1, calves were classified into groups with a low ( 3.0 μg/mL) serum haptoglobin concentration and allotted into pens on the basis of group. In experiment 2, calves were classified as having or not having detectable serum haptoglobin concentrations. Results—In experiment 1, average daily gain from days 1 to 7 decreased as haptoglobin concentration increased. Dry-matter intake (DMI) from days 1 to 21 decreased with increasing haptoglobin concentration, and DMI typically decreased from days 1 to 63. Total Bovine Respiratory Disease morbidity rate typically increased w…

  • the epidemiology of Bovine Respiratory Disease what is the evidence for preventive measures
    Canadian Veterinary Journal-revue Veterinaire Canadienne, 2010
    Co-Authors: Jared D Taylor, Robert W Fulton, Terry W Lehenbauer, D L Step, A W Confer

    Abstract:

    Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is the most common and costly Disease of beef cattle in North America. Despite extensive research, industry practices are often more informed by dogma than by fact. Frequently advocated interventions, including vaccination, various processing procedures, and nutritional manipulation, have limited impact on morbidity and mortality. Evidence for use of oral antimicrobials, either in feed or water, appears to be equivocal. In contrast, preconditioning and metaphylaxis have significant scientific evidence of efficacy, with weaning prior to sale potentially being the most important component of preconditioning. The inability to reach more definitive conclusions in preventing BRD may be attributable to difficulties in investigating the Disease. Study challenges include potential for extensive confounding, tremendous variability, the multi-factorial nature of the Disease, and inadequate methods for diagnosis.

T L Ollivett – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • how does housing influence Bovine Respiratory Disease in dairy and veal calves
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: T L Ollivett

    Abstract:

    Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in young cattle. Housing factors that lead to poor ventilation and stagnant air are often considered the primary reasons for high levels of endemic Disease. This article reviews the literature from the past 40 years in order to determine which housing factors have been associated with Respiratory Disease. Penning strategy and its affect on calf Respiratory health were most commonly studied. The wide variation in Disease definitions and quality of reporting make drawing conclusions from the available literature extraordinarily difficult.

  • short communication behavioral attitude scores associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease identified using calf lung ultrasound and clinical Respiratory scoring
    Journal of Dairy Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: M C Cramer, K L Proudfoot, T L Ollivett

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to determine whether calves exhibit differences in behavioral attitude when diagnosed with their first Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) event and whether fever (≥39°C) at the time of BRD diagnosis affected attitude. Preweaned dairy calves (n = 280; 21 ± 6 d) were examined twice weekly until weaning using a clinical Respiratory score (CRS; CRS+: 2 Respiratory categories with scores of 2 or greater; CRS−: 1 Respiratory category with a score of 2 or greater or all Respiratory categories scoring less than 2), lung ultrasound, and attitude score (normal = bright, alert, responsive; depressed = dull but responds to stimulation, slow to stand, or reluctant to lie down). Bovine Respiratory Disease was categorized as subclinical BRD (SBRD; CRS− and lung consolidation ≥1 cm2; n = 164) or clinical BRD (CBRD; CRS+, with or without lung consolidation; n = 79). Calves without BRD (NOBRD; n = 37) remained CRS− with lung consolidation

  • on farm use of ultrasonography for Bovine Respiratory Disease
    Veterinary Clinics of North America-food Animal Practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: T L Ollivett, Sebastien Buczinski

    Abstract:

    : Thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) in young cattle has recently gained momentum as an accurate and practical tool for identifying the lung lesions associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease. As cattle producers increasingly seek input from their veterinarians on Respiratory health issues, Bovine practitioners should consider adding TUS to their practice models. This article discusses the relevant literature regarding TUS in young cattle, current acceptable techniques, and practical on-farm applications.