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Bovine Tuberculosis

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J P Vermeersch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • towards eradication of Bovine Tuberculosis in the european union
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: F Reviriego J Gordejo, J P Vermeersch

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews the developments and progress towards eradication of Bovine Tuberculosis in the European Union (EU). A historical view of the EU legislation aimed at mainly approximating provisions on intra-community in cattle trade explains the present EU policies. The variety of cattle breeding systems and environmental conditions in the EU leads to different epidemiological situations. The current situation of Bovine Tuberculosis in the EU Member States is summarised, and current policy in the EU is outlined.

Gillian Colclough – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ‘Filthy vessels’: milk safety and attempts to restrict the spread of Bovine Tuberculosis in Queensland.
    Health and History, 2020
    Co-Authors: Gillian Colclough

    Abstract:

    Bovine Tuberculosis is a dangerous mycobacterium that can be conveyed to humans in the meat and milk of cattle. By the mid-1800s, when health scientists began arguing about its zoonotic potential and danger to humans, the disease was well established in Australian cattle herds. This article examines the Queensland response to Bovine Tuberculosis from the late 1800s to the 1940s, when the problem of tubercular cattle could no longer be ignored. It shows that despite widespread concern about milk safety and increasing knowledge of the disease’s aetiology, the Queensland government directed its milk safety activities towards public health education rather than the inadequacies of the dairy industry’s approach to Bovine Tuberculosis. As such, it was tardy in addressing Bovine Tuberculosis.

  • ‘Filthy Vessels’: Milk Safety and Attempts to Restrict the Spread of Bovine Tuberculosis
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Gillian Colclough

    Abstract:

    Bovine Tuberculosis is a dangerous mycobacterium that can be conveyed to humans in the meat and milk of cattle. By the mid-1800s, when health scientists began arguing about its zoonotic potential and danger to humans, the disease was well established in Australian cattle herds. This article examines the Queensland response to Bovine Tuberculosis from the late 1800s to the 1940s, when the problem of tubercular cattle could no longer be ignored. It shows that despite widespread concern about milk safety and increasing knowledge of the disease’s aetiology, the Queensland government directed its milk safety activities towards public health education rather than the inadequacies of the dairy industry’s approach to Bovine Tuberculosis. As such, it was tardy in addressing Bovine Tuberculosis. Cow’s milk has long been part of the western diet. Untainted, it is a useful resource where breastfeeding is not possible, a valuable source of nutrition for growing children and a popular beverage or processed food for adults; but when infected with pathogens such as those that cause gastroenteritis, diarrhoea, typhoid, or Bovine Tuberculosis, milk can conceal life-threatening hazards. Such was especially the case in the late–nineteenth and early–twentieth century when thousands of infants and children were made seriously or fatally ill by ingesting untreated and unrefrigerated milk. Surviving a childhood infection was often not the end of the encounter for children who caught Tuberculosis from milk. Tubercular infections can lie dormant and reappear aggressively at a time of later frailty; consequently, Tuberculosis is particularly insidious among the diseases carried in milk. The Bovine form is closely related to that most associated with human infection—what was once familiar as pulmonary Tuberculosis, consumption, phthisis, or TB (sometimes Mtb), is known scientifi cally as Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. 1

F Reviriego J Gordejo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • towards eradication of Bovine Tuberculosis in the european union
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: F Reviriego J Gordejo, J P Vermeersch

    Abstract:

    This paper reviews the developments and progress towards eradication of Bovine Tuberculosis in the European Union (EU). A historical view of the EU legislation aimed at mainly approximating provisions on intra-community in cattle trade explains the present EU policies. The variety of cattle breeding systems and environmental conditions in the EU leads to different epidemiological situations. The current situation of Bovine Tuberculosis in the EU Member States is summarised, and current policy in the EU is outlined.