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Brain Imaging

The Experts below are selected from a list of 80382 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Robert R. Alfano – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • An optical window for deep Brain Imaging
    SPIE Newsroom, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lingyan Shi, Laura A Sordillo, Adrián Rodríguez-contreras, Robert R. Alfano

    Abstract:

    Near-IR light at wavelengths of 1600–1870nm offers the best transmittance for deep Brain Imaging.

  • transmission in near infrared optical windows for deep Brain Imaging
    Journal of Biophotonics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lingyan Shi, Laura A Sordillo, Adrian Rodriguezcontreras, Robert R. Alfano

    Abstract:

    Near-infrared (NIR) radiation has been employed using one- and two-photon excitation of fluorescence Imaging at wavelengths 650–950 nm (optical window I) for deep Brain Imaging; however, longer wavelengths in NIR have been overlooked due to a lack of suitable NIR-low band gap semiconductor Imaging detectors and/or femtosecond laser sources. This research introduces three new optical windows in NIR and demonstrates their potential for deep Brain tissue Imaging. The transmittances are measured in rat Brain tissue in the second (II, 1,100–1,350 nm), third (III, 1,600–1,870 nm), and fourth (IV, centered at 2,200 nm) NIR optical tissue windows. The relationship between transmission and tissue thickness is measured and compared with the theory. Due to a reduction in scattering and minimal absorption, window III is shown to be the best for deep Brain Imaging, and windows II and IV show similar but better potential for deep Imaging than window I.

Lingyan Shi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • An optical window for deep Brain Imaging
    SPIE Newsroom, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lingyan Shi, Laura A Sordillo, Adrián Rodríguez-contreras, Robert R. Alfano

    Abstract:

    Near-IR light at wavelengths of 1600–1870nm offers the best transmittance for deep Brain Imaging.

  • transmission in near infrared optical windows for deep Brain Imaging
    Journal of Biophotonics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lingyan Shi, Laura A Sordillo, Adrian Rodriguezcontreras, Robert R. Alfano

    Abstract:

    Near-infrared (NIR) radiation has been employed using one- and two-photon excitation of fluorescence Imaging at wavelengths 650–950 nm (optical window I) for deep Brain Imaging; however, longer wavelengths in NIR have been overlooked due to a lack of suitable NIR-low band gap semiconductor Imaging detectors and/or femtosecond laser sources. This research introduces three new optical windows in NIR and demonstrates their potential for deep Brain tissue Imaging. The transmittances are measured in rat Brain tissue in the second (II, 1,100–1,350 nm), third (III, 1,600–1,870 nm), and fourth (IV, centered at 2,200 nm) NIR optical tissue windows. The relationship between transmission and tissue thickness is measured and compared with the theory. Due to a reduction in scattering and minimal absorption, window III is shown to be the best for deep Brain Imaging, and windows II and IV show similar but better potential for deep Imaging than window I.

Elizabeth M C Hillman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • optical Brain Imaging in vivo techniques and applications from animal to man
    Journal of Biomedical Optics, 2007
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth M C Hillman

    Abstract:

    Optical Brain Imaging has seen 30 years of intense development, and has grown into a rich and diverse field. In-vivo Imaging using light provides unprecedented sensitivity to functional changes through intrinsic contrast, and is rapidly exploiting the growing availability of exogenous optical contrast agents. Light can be used to image microscopic structure and function in vivo in exposed animal Brain, while also allowing noninvasive Imaging of hemodynamics and metabolism in a clinical setting. This work presents an overview of the wide range of approaches currently being applied to in-vivo optical Brain Imaging, from animal to man. Techniques include multispectral optical Imaging, voltage sensitive dye Imaging and speckle-flow Imaging of exposed cortex, in-vivo two-photon microscopy of the living Brain, and the broad range of noninvasive topography and tomography approaches to near-infrared Imaging of the human Brain. The basic principles of each technique are described, followed by examples of current applications to cutting-edge neuroscience research. In summary, it is shown that optical Brain Imaging continues to grow and evolve, embracing new technologies and advancing to address ever more complex and important neuroscience questions.