Break Crops - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Break Crops

The Experts below are selected from a list of 237 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ann Mcneill – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Phosphorus uptake benefit for wheat following legume Break Crops in semi-arid Australian farming systems
    Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ashlea L Doolette, Roger Armstrong, Caixian Tang, Christopher N Guppy, Sean Mason, Ann Mcneill

    Abstract:

    This field study assessed phosphorus dynamics (crop-P uptake, resin-extractable P in the root-zone, P mobilisation and microbial-P) in Break crop-cereal rotation sequences at four Australian semi-arid field sites differing in soil P fertility. Phosphorus mobilisation (9–30 kg P ha^−1) was apparent under Break Crops, consistently under canola and peas at three sites with low soil P fertility (i.e. pre-sowing soil resin-extractable P  

  • phosphorus uptake benefit for wheat following legume Break Crops in semi arid australian farming systems
    Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 2019
    Co-Authors: Ashlea L Doolette, Roger Armstrong, Caixian Tang, Christopher N Guppy, Sean Mason, Ann Mcneill

    Abstract:

    This field study assessed phosphorus dynamics (crop-P uptake, resin-extractable P in the root-zone, P mobilisation and microbial-P) in Break crop-cereal rotation sequences at four Australian semi-arid field sites differing in soil P fertility. Phosphorus mobilisation (9–30 kg P ha−1) was apparent under Break Crops, consistently under canola and peas at three sites with low soil P fertility (i.e. pre-sowing soil resin-extractable P  < 20 mg P kg−1). Enhanced biological cycling of P (i.e. increased microbial-P) was limited to a low P site in the Break crop phase. Phosphorus content of Break crop aboveground residues following grain removal was 1–7 kg P ha−1; P input was greater (12–18 kg P ha−1) where legumes were green/brown manured. Varied residue P input did not result in differences in resin-extractable or microbial-P in soil prior to sowing wheat. Phosphorus uptake was greater for wheat after legume Break Crops compared to continuous wheat (2.0–4.7 kg P ha−1) at all sites, especially where Crops were green/brown-manured (3.9–5.9 kg P ha−1). Greater P uptake by wheat was associated with increased grain yield at three sites but was not significantly correlated with the quantity of P input from Break crop residues at all four sites or with soil mineral nitrogen pre-sowing of wheat at three sites. Break Crops can directly contribute to P resource-use efficiency by mobilising residual P from soil but the agronomic significance of P supply from Break crop residues to a P uptake benefit for following wheat remains to be elucidated.

A M Litterick – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Agronomic and Economic Potential of Break Crops for Ley/Arable Rotations in Temperate Organic Agriculture
    Advances in Agronomy, 2020
    Co-Authors: M C Robson, S M Fowler, Nic Lampkin, Carlo Leifert, Malcolm H Leitch, David Robinson, C A Watson, A M Litterick

    Abstract:

    Organic farming principles dictate that cereals cannot be grown continuously, and in practice they are rarely grown for more than 50% of the rotation. Choice of Break Crops to grow in addition to cereals and the fertility building phase are crucial to both the agronomic and economic success of the rotation on organic arable farms. There are four specific functions that a Break crop may perform, namely, addition, conservation, and cycling of nutrients; pest and/or disease control; weed control and improvement in soil physical characteristics. Individual Break Crops may perform one or several of these functions. A good Break crop must also produce satisfactory yields, be of marketable quality, and produce an economic return for the farmer. This review assesses the potential of 10 Break Crops (bean, lupin, soybean, hemp, oilseed rape, potato, carrot, swede, sugar beet, linola) in terms of their Break function, their impact on the subsequent crop in temperate organic agricultural systems, and their economic value in UK agriculture. All species assessed had valuable Break crop characteristics. Hemp, lupin, and faba bean had the greatest economic potential, but hemp and lupin currently generate poor economic returns. Linola and soybean are useful Break Crops, although soybean may have allelopathic effects on subsequent wheat seedlings. Swede, potato, and carrot are the most profitable Crops, but are less valuable in the rotation in terms of soil fertility than hemp, bean, or lupin. Sugar beet and oilseed rape are difficult to grow organically and at present have limited organic markets.

  • An investigation into the relationship between preceding Break Crops and weed populations in barley Crops in organic ley/arable rotations
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: A M Litterick, C A Watson, M C Robson

    Abstract:

    This report was presented at the UK Organic Research 2002 Conference. The relationship between weed populations and cereal Crops following nine organic Break Crops was investigated in field trials in Warwickshire, Aberdeenshire and Ceredigion in 2001. Weed biodiversity was high on all sites and varied between sites in terms of species present. Severity of weed infestation differed significantly between sites and between cereals following different Break Crops. The impact of Break crop species on the incidence and severity of the weed burden in the following cereal is discussed in relation to the field trials at the three sites.

  • the agronomic and economic potential of Break Crops for ley arable rotations in temperate organic agriculture
    Advances in Agronomy, 2002
    Co-Authors: M C Robson, S M Fowler, Nic Lampkin, Carlo Leifert, Malcolm H Leitch, David Robinson, C A Watson, A M Litterick

    Abstract:

    Organic farming principles dictate that cereals cannot be grown continuously, and in practice they are rarely grown for more than 50% of the rotation. Choice of Break Crops to grow in addition to cereals and the fertility building phase are crucial to both the agronomic and economic success of the rotation on organic arable farms. There are four specific functions that a Break crop may perform, namely, addition, conservation, and cycling of nutrients; pest and/or disease control; weed control and improvement in soil physical characteristics. Individual Break Crops may perform one or several of these functions. A good Break crop must also produce satisfactory yields, be of marketable quality, and produce an economic return for the farmer. This review assesses the potential of 10 Break Crops (bean, lupin, soybean, hemp, oilseed rape, potato, carrot, swede, sugar beet, linola) in terms of their Break function, their impact on the subsequent crop in temperate organic agricultural systems, and their economic value in UK agriculture. All species assessed had valuable Break crop characteristics. Hemp, lupin, and faba bean had the greatest economic potential, but hemp and lupin currently generate poor economic returns. Linola and soybean are useful Break Crops, although soybean may have allelopathic effects on subsequent wheat seedlings. Swede, potato, and carrot are the most profitable Crops, but are less valuable in the rotation in terms of soil fertility than hemp, bean, or lupin. Sugar beet and oilseed rape are difficult to grow organically and at present have limited organic markets.

M C Robson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Agronomic and Economic Potential of Break Crops for Ley/Arable Rotations in Temperate Organic Agriculture
    Advances in Agronomy, 2020
    Co-Authors: M C Robson, S M Fowler, Nic Lampkin, Carlo Leifert, Malcolm H Leitch, David Robinson, C A Watson, A M Litterick

    Abstract:

    Organic farming principles dictate that cereals cannot be grown continuously, and in practice they are rarely grown for more than 50% of the rotation. Choice of Break Crops to grow in addition to cereals and the fertility building phase are crucial to both the agronomic and economic success of the rotation on organic arable farms. There are four specific functions that a Break crop may perform, namely, addition, conservation, and cycling of nutrients; pest and/or disease control; weed control and improvement in soil physical characteristics. Individual Break Crops may perform one or several of these functions. A good Break crop must also produce satisfactory yields, be of marketable quality, and produce an economic return for the farmer. This review assesses the potential of 10 Break Crops (bean, lupin, soybean, hemp, oilseed rape, potato, carrot, swede, sugar beet, linola) in terms of their Break function, their impact on the subsequent crop in temperate organic agricultural systems, and their economic value in UK agriculture. All species assessed had valuable Break crop characteristics. Hemp, lupin, and faba bean had the greatest economic potential, but hemp and lupin currently generate poor economic returns. Linola and soybean are useful Break Crops, although soybean may have allelopathic effects on subsequent wheat seedlings. Swede, potato, and carrot are the most profitable Crops, but are less valuable in the rotation in terms of soil fertility than hemp, bean, or lupin. Sugar beet and oilseed rape are difficult to grow organically and at present have limited organic markets.

  • An investigation into the relationship between preceding Break Crops and weed populations in barley Crops in organic ley/arable rotations
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: A M Litterick, C A Watson, M C Robson

    Abstract:

    This report was presented at the UK Organic Research 2002 Conference. The relationship between weed populations and cereal Crops following nine organic Break Crops was investigated in field trials in Warwickshire, Aberdeenshire and Ceredigion in 2001. Weed biodiversity was high on all sites and varied between sites in terms of species present. Severity of weed infestation differed significantly between sites and between cereals following different Break Crops. The impact of Break crop species on the incidence and severity of the weed burden in the following cereal is discussed in relation to the field trials at the three sites.

  • the agronomic and economic potential of Break Crops for ley arable rotations in temperate organic agriculture
    Advances in Agronomy, 2002
    Co-Authors: M C Robson, S M Fowler, Nic Lampkin, Carlo Leifert, Malcolm H Leitch, David Robinson, C A Watson, A M Litterick

    Abstract:

    Organic farming principles dictate that cereals cannot be grown continuously, and in practice they are rarely grown for more than 50% of the rotation. Choice of Break Crops to grow in addition to cereals and the fertility building phase are crucial to both the agronomic and economic success of the rotation on organic arable farms. There are four specific functions that a Break crop may perform, namely, addition, conservation, and cycling of nutrients; pest and/or disease control; weed control and improvement in soil physical characteristics. Individual Break Crops may perform one or several of these functions. A good Break crop must also produce satisfactory yields, be of marketable quality, and produce an economic return for the farmer. This review assesses the potential of 10 Break Crops (bean, lupin, soybean, hemp, oilseed rape, potato, carrot, swede, sugar beet, linola) in terms of their Break function, their impact on the subsequent crop in temperate organic agricultural systems, and their economic value in UK agriculture. All species assessed had valuable Break crop characteristics. Hemp, lupin, and faba bean had the greatest economic potential, but hemp and lupin currently generate poor economic returns. Linola and soybean are useful Break Crops, although soybean may have allelopathic effects on subsequent wheat seedlings. Swede, potato, and carrot are the most profitable Crops, but are less valuable in the rotation in terms of soil fertility than hemp, bean, or lupin. Sugar beet and oilseed rape are difficult to grow organically and at present have limited organic markets.