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Buffer Gas

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John M Doyle – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • probing Buffer Gas cooled molecules with direct frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid infrared
    Frontiers in Optics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ben Spaun, David Patterson, P B Changala, Bryce J Bjork, Oliver H Heckl, Jun Ye, John M Doyle

    Abstract:

    We demonstrate cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy on BufferGas cooled molecules. By coupling a mid-infrared frequency comb to a high-finesse cavity surrounding a 4 K BufferGas chamber, we obtain rotationally resolved absorption spectra of multiple vibrational bands of nitromethane.

  • Buffer Gas loaded magneto optical traps for yb tm er and ho
    New Journal of Physics, 2014
    Co-Authors: John M Doyle, Boerge Hemmerling, Garrett Drayna, Eunmi Chae, Aakash Ravi

    Abstract:

    Direct loading of lanthanide atoms into magneto-optical traps (MOTs) from a very slow cryogenic Buffer Gas beam source is achieved, without the need for laser slowing. The beam source has an average forward velocity of 60– and a velocity half-width of , which allows for direct MOT loading of Yb, Tm, Er and Ho. Residual helium background Gas originating from the beam results in a maximum trap lifetime of about 80 ms (with Yb). The addition of a single-frequency slowing laser applied to the Yb in the Buffer Gas beam increases the number of trapped Yb atoms to with a loading rate of . Decay to metastable states is observed for all trapped species and decay rates are measured. Extension of this approach to the loading of molecules into a MOT is discussed.

  • the Buffer Gas beam an intense cold and slow source for atoms and molecules
    Chemical Reviews, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nicholas R. Hutzler, Hsini Lu, John M Doyle

    Abstract:

    Beams of atoms and molecules are stalwart tools for
    spectroscopy and studies of collisional processes. The
    supersonic expansion technique can create cold beams of
    many species of atoms and molecules. However, the resulting beam is typically moving at a speed of 300−600 m s^(−1) in the laboratory frame and, for a large class of species, has insufficient flux (i.e., brightness) for important applications. In contrast, Buffer Gas beams can be a superior method in many cases, producing cold and relatively slow atoms and molecules (see Figure 1) in the laboratory frame with high brightness and great versatility. There are basic differences between supersonic and Buffer Gas cooled beams regarding particular technological advantages and constraints. At present, it is clear that not all of the possible variations on the Buffer Gas method have been studied. In this review, we will present a survey of the current
    state of the art in Buffer Gas beams, and explore some of the possible future directions that these new methods might take.

Raymond J. Beach – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Resonance transition 795-nm rubidium laser using He Buffer Gas
    High-Power Laser Ablation VII, 2008
    Co-Authors: Sheldon Wu, Thomas F. Soules, Ralph H. Page, Scott C. Mitchell, V. Keith Kanz, Raymond J. Beach

    Abstract:

    Resonance transition rubidium laser (5 2 P 1/2 →5 2 S 1/2 ) is demonstrated with a hydrocarbon-free Buffer Gas. Prior
    demonstrations of alkali resonance transition lasers have used ethane as either the Buffer Gas or a Buffer Gas component
    to promote rapid fine-structure mixing. However, our experience suggests that the alkali vapor reacts with the ethane
    producing carbon as one of the reaction products. This degrades long term laser reliability. Our recent experimental
    results with a “clean” helium-only Buffer Gas system pumped by a Ti:sapphire laser demonstrate all the advantages of the
    original alkali laser system, but without the reliability issues associated with the use of ethane. We further report a
    demonstration of a rubidium laser using a Buffer Gas consisting of pure 3 He. Using isotopically enriched 3 He Gas yields
    enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He Buffer Gas pressure,
    improved thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhanced power scaling potential of such systems.

  • resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser using 3he Buffer Gas
    Optics Communications, 2008
    Co-Authors: Thomas F. Soules, Ralph H. Page, Scott C. Mitchell, Sheldon S Q Wu, Keith V Kanz, Raymond J. Beach

    Abstract:

    Abstract We report a demonstration of a 795-nm rubidium optical resonance transition laser using a Buffer Gas consisting of pure 3 He. This follows our recent demonstration of a hydrocarbon-free 795-nm rubidium resonance laser which used naturally-occurring He as the Buffer Gas. Using He Gas that is isotopically enriched with 3 He yields enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He Buffer Gas pressure, improved thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhanced power scaling potential of such systems.

  • resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser using 3he Buffer Gas
    Advanced Solid-State Photonics (2008) paper WB2, 2008
    Co-Authors: Sheldon S Q Wu, Thomas F. Soules, Ralph H. Page, Scott C. Mitchell, Keith V Kanz, Raymond J. Beach

    Abstract:

    Demonstration of 795-nm Rubidium laser using a Buffer Gas consisting of pure3He is reported. The use of3He yields enhanced mixing of Rb fine-structure levels and enables efficient lasing at reduced Buffer Gas pressures.

George R Welch – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Influence of a Buffer Gas on nonlinear magneto-optical polarization rotation
    Journal of The Optical Society of America B-optical Physics, 2005
    Co-Authors: Irina Novikova, Andrey B. Matsko, George R Welch

    Abstract:

    We show experimentally that the presence of a Buffer Gas in a rubidium vapor cell modifies significantly the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation of polarization of near-resonant light propagating through the cell. We observe not only the well-known narrowing of the nonlinear magneto-optical resonances, but also changes in their shape and visibility. We explain these effects in terms of coherence-preserving, velocity-changing collisions between rubidium and Buffer Gas atoms.

  • Buffer Gas induced absorption resonances in rb vapor
    Physical Review A, 2004
    Co-Authors: E E Mikhailov, Irina Novikova, Yuri V Rostovtsev, George R Welch

    Abstract:

    We observe transformation of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance into an absorption resonance in a {lambda} interaction configuration in a cell filled with {sup 87}Rb and a Buffer Gas. This transformation occurs as one-photon detuning of the coupling fields is varied from the atomic transition. No such absorption resonance is found in the absence of a Buffer Gas. The width of the absorption resonance is several times smaller than the width of the EIT resonance, and the changes of absorption near these resonances are about the same. Similar absorption resonances are detected in the Hanle configuration in a Buffered cell.

  • absorption resonance and large negative delay in rubidium vapor with a Buffer Gas
    Journal of The Optical Society of America B-optical Physics, 2004
    Co-Authors: E E Mikhailov, Yuri V Rostovtsev, Vladimir A Sautenkov, George R Welch

    Abstract:

    We observe a narrow, isolated, two-photon absorption resonance in 87Rb for large one-photon detuning in the presence of a Buffer Gas. In the absence of a Buffer Gas, a standard Λ configuration of two laser frequencies gives rise to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for all values of one-photon detuning throughout the inhomogeneously (Doppler) broadened line. However, when a Buffer Gas is added and the one-photon detuning is comparable to or greater than the Doppler width, an absorption resonance appears instead of the usual EIT resonance. We also observe a large negative group delay (≈−300 μs for a Gaussian pulse that propagates through the media with respect to a reference pulse not affected by the media), corresponding to a superluminal group velocity vg=−c/(3.6×106)=−84 m/s.