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Calcium Ascorbate

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Samuel Bernal – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Vitamin C metabolites, independent of smoking status, significantly enhance leukocyte, but not plasma Ascorbate concentrations.
    Advances in Therapy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mark A. Moyad, Maile A. Combs, Angelica S. Vrablic, Janet Velasquez, Benilda Turner, Samuel Bernal

    Abstract:

    Introduction
    The objective of this study was to test the effects of acute doses of vitamin C alone, Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo, on total plasma and leukocyte vitamin C concentrations over 24 hours.

  • Vitamin C metabolites, independent of smoking status, significantly enhance leukocyte, but not plasma Ascorbate concentrations
    Advances in Therapy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mark A. Moyad, Maile A. Combs, Angelica S. Vrablic, Janet Velasquez, Benilda Turner, Samuel Bernal

    Abstract:

    Introduction The objective of this study was to test the effects of acute doses of vitamin C alone, Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo, on total plasma and leukocyte vitamin C concentrations over 24 hours. Methods A double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-way crossover study was performed consisting of four separate phases lasting 24 hours each and utilizing one of four oral 1000-mg preparations within each phase (one of vitamin C alone, two separate vitamin C formulations of Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo). There was a 7-day washout between phases, and blood draws at seven time points within each phase of the study for a total of 28 serologic measurements per subject and 420 total measurements for the entire clinical trial. Vitamin C concentration in plasma and leukocytes were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at baseline and at six sequential time periods over 24 hours. Results Fifteen healthy males were enrolled, aged 18–39 years; nine were had never smoked and six were chronic smokers. No significant difference in plasma vitamin C levels was observed when comparing the different preparations. However, at 24 hours, Calcium Ascorbate with metabolites resulted in significantly higher concentrations of vitamin C in leukocytes ( P

Mark A. Moyad – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Lifestyle Changes, CAM, and Kidney Stones: Heart Health = Kidney Health
    Complementary & Alternative Medicine for Prostate and Urologic Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Mark A. Moyad

    Abstract:

    It appears that reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) may also be the ideal diet and lifestyle program to reduce the risk of kidney stones. Comprehensive lifestyle changes and healthy-heart parameters have synergistic impacts on reducing recurrent or incident nephrolithiasis as observed either in randomized trials from Parma, Italy, or from the observational cohort analysis when utilizing the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) program in the USA. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, weight and waist gain and accelerated large amounts of weight loss (bariatric surgery, diet, etc.), glucose intolerance/diabetes, and metabolic syndrome increase stone risk, but a higher potassium to sodium intake ratio, increased dietary magnesium, reduced animal protein, and normalizing dietary Calcium and increased fluid intake could lower risk. Soluble dietary oxalates are more concerning compared to insoluble forms. A variety of dietary supplements also appear to impact risk. Arguably the best-known supplemental source of increased oxalate is from high dosages (>1,000–1,500 mg/day) of plain vitamin C (ascorbic acid), and Calcium Ascorbate or buffered vitamin C may cause less profound changes in oxalate. Vitamin C may lower serum uric acid and gout risk by also creating a higher urinary uric acid load in some individuals, which could also theoretically increase uric acid stone risk. Some cranberry concentrate supplements for urinary tract infection (UTI) have unusually high oxalate concentrations and need to be tested for this compound. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride and potentially pyridoxal-5-phosphate) shifts oxalate metabolism toward the production of glycine at dosages of 50–100 mg per day and could be beneficial in some oxalate stone formers apart from those with primary hyperoxaluria type I. Higher dosages (300 mg or more) could also cause a sensory peripheral neuropathy. A probiotic or Oxalobacter formigenes and other intestinal bacterial may also play a role in reducing oxalate levels. Calcium supplements in excess appear to increase the risk of stone disease, especially Calcium carbonate, and Calcium citrate is an alternative for those with a history of oxalate stones, but supplementation also increases constipation risk with age. Vitamin D has a controversial impact on stone risk, but megadosing is never prudent. Omega-3 fatty acids supplements via anti-inflammatory effects could reduce stone risk, and omega-6 has some preliminary similar benefits, but inosine dietary supplementation is known to increase uric acid levels and stone disease. A variety of other CAM options are discussed in this chapter. What if healthcare professionals in urology could have some role in helping patients improve the quality and quantity of their life via comprehensive lifestyle recommendations for stone disease risk reduction? It appears that this is no longer a question, but a reality.

  • Vitamin C metabolites, independent of smoking status, significantly enhance leukocyte, but not plasma Ascorbate concentrations.
    Advances in Therapy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mark A. Moyad, Maile A. Combs, Angelica S. Vrablic, Janet Velasquez, Benilda Turner, Samuel Bernal

    Abstract:

    Introduction
    The objective of this study was to test the effects of acute doses of vitamin C alone, Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo, on total plasma and leukocyte vitamin C concentrations over 24 hours.

  • Vitamin C metabolites, independent of smoking status, significantly enhance leukocyte, but not plasma Ascorbate concentrations
    Advances in Therapy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mark A. Moyad, Maile A. Combs, Angelica S. Vrablic, Janet Velasquez, Benilda Turner, Samuel Bernal

    Abstract:

    Introduction The objective of this study was to test the effects of acute doses of vitamin C alone, Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo, on total plasma and leukocyte vitamin C concentrations over 24 hours. Methods A double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-way crossover study was performed consisting of four separate phases lasting 24 hours each and utilizing one of four oral 1000-mg preparations within each phase (one of vitamin C alone, two separate vitamin C formulations of Calcium Ascorbate with vitamin C metabolites, and placebo). There was a 7-day washout between phases, and blood draws at seven time points within each phase of the study for a total of 28 serologic measurements per subject and 420 total measurements for the entire clinical trial. Vitamin C concentration in plasma and leukocytes were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at baseline and at six sequential time periods over 24 hours. Results Fifteen healthy males were enrolled, aged 18–39 years; nine were had never smoked and six were chronic smokers. No significant difference in plasma vitamin C levels was observed when comparing the different preparations. However, at 24 hours, Calcium Ascorbate with metabolites resulted in significantly higher concentrations of vitamin C in leukocytes ( P

Allan B. Woolf – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • hot water treatment in combination with Calcium Ascorbate dips increases bioactive compounds and helps to maintain fresh cut apple quality
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Encarna Aguayo, Roger Stanley, Cecilia Requejojackman, Allan B. Woolf

    Abstract:

    Fresh-cut ‘Braeburn’ apple slices were dipped into cold water (4 °C for 2 min) or hot water (HWT, 48 °C or 55 °C for 2 min) followed by dips into 0 or 6% w/v aqueous Calcium Ascorbate (CaAsc, 2 min, 0 °C) and stored in air up to 28 d at 4 °C. Microbial counts, changes in browning and sensory acceptance were determined to indicate changes in quality. Changes in antioxidant levels were measured using free radical scavenging activity (DPPH), reducing activity (FRAP), ascorbic acid content (AA) and polyphenolic content (by HPLC). CaAsc dips had a strong impact reducing the browning through increasing the flesh luminosity and hue angle. 6% CaAsc in fresh-cut apples extended the overall acceptability from less than 7 d to 14 d. Immediately after CaAsc treatment, AA content was 5 fold higher (0.25–1.25 g kg−1) than those not dipped into CaAsc. However, the combination of HWT treatments and CaAsc dips led to seven fold increased levels of AA inside the apple tissue (0.25–1.85 g kg−1) and consequently increased the antioxidant activity. HWT did not increase the AA content when not combined with CaAsc dips. The HWT CaAsc dip extended the overall acceptability to 21 d compared to 14 d for samples not heated but dipped into CaAsc. Shelf life was ultimately limited by sensory quality. At day 28, total plate counts were reduced from 5.3 log cfu/g (untreated slices) to 4.6 log cfu/g in the 6% CaAsc dips and further to 3.9 log cfu/g with the combination of HWT and CaAsc dip. Changes in the content of phenolic compounds with time, HWT and CaAsc dip were generally not significant except for slightly increased quercetin and phloridzin levels and decreased p-coumaric and procyanidins over time. The combination of HWT at 48 °C for 2 min followed by 6% CaAsc dip would be best for preserving the eating quality of apple slices.

  • Effects of Calcium Ascorbate treatments and storage atmosphere on antioxidant activity and quality of fresh-cut apple slices.
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Encarna Aguayo, Cecilia Requejo-jackman, Roger Stanley, Allan B. Woolf

    Abstract:

    Fresh-cut ‘Braeburn’ apple slices were dipped in Calcium Ascorbate (CaAsc; 0, 2, 6, 12 and 20%, w/w) and stored in air or under modified atmosphere (MA) conditions for up to 28 d at 4 °C. Changes in antioxidant levels were measured using free radical scavenging activity (DPPH), reducing activity (FRAP), ascorbic acid content (AA) and polyphenolic content (by HPLC). Changes in browning, sensory quality and microbial counts were measured to indicate eating quality. CaAsc dips increased the initial levels of AA from 0.19 g kg−1 in the untreated control to 3.8 g kg−1 for the 20% CaAsc treatment. Ascorbic acid content of treated slices during storage decreased by more than 50% in CaAsc concentrations of 6, 12 and 20%. Similar patterns were observed for FRAP and DPPH activities. Untreated or 2% CaAsc treated slices stored in air or MA showed browning, microbial deterioration and poor sensory quality, thus resulting in a short shelf life (

  • effects of Calcium Ascorbate treatments and storage atmosphere on antioxidant activity and quality of fresh cut apple slices
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Encarna Aguayo, Roger Stanley, Cecilia Requejojackman, Allan B. Woolf

    Abstract:

    Fresh-cut ‘Braeburn’ apple slices were dipped in Calcium Ascorbate (CaAsc; 0, 2, 6, 12 and 20%, w/w) and stored in air or under modified atmosphere (MA) conditions for up to 28 d at 4 °C. Changes in antioxidant levels were measured using free radical scavenging activity (DPPH), reducing activity (FRAP), ascorbic acid content (AA) and polyphenolic content (by HPLC). Changes in browning, sensory quality and microbial counts were measured to indicate eating quality. CaAsc dips increased the initial levels of AA from 0.19 g kg−1 in the untreated control to 3.8 g kg−1 for the 20% CaAsc treatment. Ascorbic acid content of treated slices during storage decreased by more than 50% in CaAsc concentrations of 6, 12 and 20%. Similar patterns were observed for FRAP and DPPH activities. Untreated or 2% CaAsc treated slices stored in air or MA showed browning, microbial deterioration and poor sensory quality, thus resulting in a short shelf life (<7 d). However, apples dipped in 6 or 12% CaAsc and stored in MA packaging, or dipped in 20% CaAsc and packaged in air or MA had a shelf life of 21–28 d. Total antioxidant activity in these treatments was provided by both exogenous ascorbic acid and endogenous phenolic compounds; the latter varied in composition, but were relatively stable during storage compared with Ascorbate in higher CaAsc concentration treatments. Thus, the antioxidant levels (as measured by FRAP and DPPH) were related to shelf life and it appears that an antioxidant activity remaining above 2 g kg−1 (DPPH or FRAP) may be a minimum level to achieve long shelf life in ‘Braeburn’ apple slices.