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Calcium Phosphate Mineral

The Experts below are selected from a list of 201 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Werner E G Muller – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • nonenzymatic transformation of amorphous caco3 into Calcium Phosphate Mineral after exposure to sodium Phosphate in vitro implications for in vivo hydroxyapatite bone formation
    ChemBioChem, 2015
    Co-Authors: Werner E G Muller, Meik Neufurth, Jian Huang, Kui Wang, Qingling Feng, Heinz C Schroder, Barbel Diehlseifert, Rafael Munozespi, Xiaohong Wang

    Abstract:

    : Studies indicate that mammalian bone formation is initiated at Calcium carbonate bioseeds, a process that is driven enzymatically by carbonic anhydrase (CA). We show that amorphous Calcium carbonate (ACC) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-) ) cause induction of expression of the CA in human osteogenic SaOS-2 cells. The Mineral deposits formed on the surface of the cells are rich in C, Ca and P. FTIR analysis revealed that ACC, vaterite, and aragonite, after exposure to Phosphate, undergo transformation into Calcium Phosphate. This exchange was not seen for calcite. The changes to ACC, vaterite, and aragonite depended on the concentration of Phosphate. The rate of incorporation of Phosphate into ACC, vaterite, and aragonite, is significantly accelerated in the presence of a peptide rich in aspartic acid and glutamic acid. We propose that the initial CaCO3 bioseed formation is driven by CA, and that the subsequent conversion to Calcium Phosphate/Calcium hydroxyapatite (exchange of carbonate by Phosphate) is a non-enzymatic exchange process.

  • biocalcite a multifunctional inorganic polymer building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of Calcium Phosphate based bone
    Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaohong Wang, Heinz C Schroder, Werner E G Muller

    Abstract:

    Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the Calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the Calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA) and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, Calcium Phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA). Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation Calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of Calcium Phosphate Mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different Calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic Calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven Calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven Calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that Calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications.

  • enzymatically synthesized inorganic polymers as morphogenetically active bone scaffolds application in regenerative medicine
    International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaohong Wang, Heinz C Schroder, Werner E G Muller

    Abstract:

    Abstract In recent years a paradigm shift in understanding of human bone formation has occurred that starts to change current concepts in tissue engineering of bone and cartilage. New discoveries revealed that fundamental steps in bioMineralization are enzyme driven, not only during hydroxyapatite deposition, but also during initial bioseed formation, involving the transient deposition and subsequent transformation of Calcium carbonate to Calcium Phosphate Mineral. The principal enzymes mediating these reactions, carbonic anhydrase and alkaline phosphatase, open novel targets for pharmacological intervention of bone diseases like osteoporosis, by applying compounds acting as potential activators of these enzymes. It is expected that these new findings will give an innovation boost for the development of scaffolds for bone repair and reconstruction, which began with the use of bioinert materials, followed by bioactive materials and now leading to functional regenerative tissue units. These new developments have become possible with the discovery of the morphogenic activity of bioinorganic polymers, biocalcit, bio-polyPhosphate and biosilica that are formed by a biogenic, enzymatic mechanism, a driving force along with the development of novel rapid-prototyping three-dimensional (3D) printing methods and bioprinting (3D cell printing) techniques that may allow a fabrication of customized implants for patients suffering in bone diseases in the future.

Xiaohong Wang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • nonenzymatic transformation of amorphous caco3 into Calcium Phosphate Mineral after exposure to sodium Phosphate in vitro implications for in vivo hydroxyapatite bone formation
    ChemBioChem, 2015
    Co-Authors: Werner E G Muller, Meik Neufurth, Jian Huang, Kui Wang, Qingling Feng, Heinz C Schroder, Barbel Diehlseifert, Rafael Munozespi, Xiaohong Wang

    Abstract:

    : Studies indicate that mammalian bone formation is initiated at Calcium carbonate bioseeds, a process that is driven enzymatically by carbonic anhydrase (CA). We show that amorphous Calcium carbonate (ACC) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-) ) cause induction of expression of the CA in human osteogenic SaOS-2 cells. The Mineral deposits formed on the surface of the cells are rich in C, Ca and P. FTIR analysis revealed that ACC, vaterite, and aragonite, after exposure to Phosphate, undergo transformation into Calcium Phosphate. This exchange was not seen for calcite. The changes to ACC, vaterite, and aragonite depended on the concentration of Phosphate. The rate of incorporation of Phosphate into ACC, vaterite, and aragonite, is significantly accelerated in the presence of a peptide rich in aspartic acid and glutamic acid. We propose that the initial CaCO3 bioseed formation is driven by CA, and that the subsequent conversion to Calcium Phosphate/Calcium hydroxyapatite (exchange of carbonate by Phosphate) is a non-enzymatic exchange process.

  • biocalcite a multifunctional inorganic polymer building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of Calcium Phosphate based bone
    Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaohong Wang, Heinz C Schroder, Werner E G Muller

    Abstract:

    Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the Calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the Calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA) and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, Calcium Phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA). Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation Calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of Calcium Phosphate Mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different Calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic Calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven Calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven Calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that Calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications.

  • enzymatically synthesized inorganic polymers as morphogenetically active bone scaffolds application in regenerative medicine
    International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaohong Wang, Heinz C Schroder, Werner E G Muller

    Abstract:

    Abstract In recent years a paradigm shift in understanding of human bone formation has occurred that starts to change current concepts in tissue engineering of bone and cartilage. New discoveries revealed that fundamental steps in bioMineralization are enzyme driven, not only during hydroxyapatite deposition, but also during initial bioseed formation, involving the transient deposition and subsequent transformation of Calcium carbonate to Calcium Phosphate Mineral. The principal enzymes mediating these reactions, carbonic anhydrase and alkaline phosphatase, open novel targets for pharmacological intervention of bone diseases like osteoporosis, by applying compounds acting as potential activators of these enzymes. It is expected that these new findings will give an innovation boost for the development of scaffolds for bone repair and reconstruction, which began with the use of bioinert materials, followed by bioactive materials and now leading to functional regenerative tissue units. These new developments have become possible with the discovery of the morphogenic activity of bioinorganic polymers, biocalcit, bio-polyPhosphate and biosilica that are formed by a biogenic, enzymatic mechanism, a driving force along with the development of novel rapid-prototyping three-dimensional (3D) printing methods and bioprinting (3D cell printing) techniques that may allow a fabrication of customized implants for patients suffering in bone diseases in the future.

Mehmet Sarikaya – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • regulation of in vitro Calcium Phosphate Mineralization by combinatorially selected hydroxyapatite binding peptides
    Biomacromolecules, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mustafa Gungormus, Hanson Fong, John Spencer Evans, Candan Tamerler, Mehmet Sarikaya

    Abstract:

    We report selection and characterization of hydroxyapatite-binding heptapeptides from a peptide−phage library and demonstrate the effects of two peptides, with different binding affinities and structural properties, on the Mineralization of Calcium Phosphate Mineral. In vitro Mineralization studies carried out using one strong- and one weak-binding peptide, HABP1 and HABP2, respectively, revealed that the former exhibited a drastic outcome on Mineralization kinetics and particle morphology. Strong-binding peptide yielded significantly larger crystals, as observed by electron microscopy, in comparison to those formed in the presence of a weak-binding peptide or in the negative control. Molecular structural studies carried out by circular dichoroism revealed that HABP1 and HABP2 differed in their secondary structure and conformational stability. The results indicate that sequence, structure, and molecular stability strongly influence the Mineralization activity of these peptides. The implication of the rese…

  • Regulation of in vitro Calcium Phosphate Mineralization by combinatorially selected hydroxyapatite-binding peptides
    Biomacromolecules, 2008
    Co-Authors: Mustafa Gungormus, Hanson Fong, Il Won Kim, John Spencer Evans, Candan Tamerler, Mehmet Sarikaya

    Abstract:

    We report selection and characterization of hydroxyapatite-binding heptapeptides from a peptide-phage library and demonstrate the effects of two peptides, with different binding affinities and structural properties, on the Mineralization of Calcium Phosphate Mineral. In vitro Mineralization studies carried out using one strong- and one weak-binding peptide, HABP1 and HABP2, respectively, revealed that the former exhibited a drastic outcome on Mineralization kinetics and particle morphology. Strong-binding peptide yielded significantly larger crystals, as observed by electron microscopy, in comparison to those formed in the presence of a weak-binding peptide or in the negative control. Molecular structural studies carried out by circular dichoroism revealed that HABP1 and HABP2 differed in their secondary structure and conformational stability. The results indicate that sequence, structure, and molecular stability strongly influence the Mineralization activity of these peptides. The implication of the research is that the combinatorially selected short-sequence peptides may be used in the restoration or regeneration of hard tissues through their control over of the formation of Calcium Phosphate bioMinerals. © 2008 American Chemical Society.