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Callitrichinae

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Guilherme S T Garbino – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Correction to: Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae)
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    In the original publication of the article, the scientific name of veined treefrog.

  • Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae)
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    We report on the predation of a veined treefrog ( Trachycephalus venulosus ) and an ocellated treefrog ( Itapotihyla langsdorffii ), both species with noxious skin secretions, by black lion tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysopygus ). The two predation events took place in Morro do Diabo State Park, an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeastern Brazil. The veined treefrog was removed from a tree hollow by an adult male, whereas the ocellated treefrog was caught on the ground after it jumped from the tree attempting to escape capture. The frogs were completely ingested and no food sharing occurred in either of the events. We did not observe any signs of irritation during the event or when the group was followed in the next day in either of the cases. These are the first reports of lion tamarins ingesting anurans with noxious secretions on the skin.

  • Correction to: Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae).
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    : We report on the predation of a veined treefrog (Trachycephalus venulosus) and an ocellated treefrog (Itapotihyla langsdorffii), both species with noxious skin secretions, by black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus). The two predation events took place in Morro do Diabo State Park, an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeastern Brazil. The veined treefrog was removed from a tree hollow by an adult male, whereas the ocellated treefrog was caught on the ground after it jumped from the tree attempting to escape capture. The frogs were completely ingested and no food sharing occurred in either of the events. We did not observe any signs of irritation during the event or when the group was followed in the next day in either of the cases. These are the first reports of lion tamarins ingesting anurans with noxious secretions on the skin.

Iracilda Sampaio – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Tocantins river as an effective barrier to gene flow in Saguinus niger populations
    Genetics and Molecular Biology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Marcelo Vallinoto, Iracilda Sampaio, Claudia Helena Tagliaro, Juliana Araripe, Péricles Sena Do Rêgo, Horacio Schneider

    Abstract:

    The Saguinus represent the basal genus of the Callitrichinae subfamily. Traditionally this genus is divided into three groups: Hairy, Mottled and Bare-face, however, molecular data failed to validate these groups as monophyletic units, as well as raised some subspecies to the species status. This is the case of the former subspecies Saguinus midas midas and S. midas niger, which are now considered as different species. In the present study, we sequenced a portion of the D-loop mtDNA region in populations from the East bank of the Xingu and from both banks of the Tocantins river, in order to test the effectiveness of large rivers as barriers to the gene flow in Saguinus. According to our results, the populations from the East and West banks of the Tocantins river are more divergent than true species like S. mystax and S. imperator. The Tocantins river may be acting as a barrier to gene flow, and consequently these very divergent populations may represent distinct taxonomic entities (species?).

  • Molecular studies of Callithrix pygmaea (Primates, Platyrrhini) based on transferrin intronic and ND1 regions: implications for taxonomy and conservation
    Genetics and Molecular Biology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Claudia Helena Tagliaro, Maria Paula Cruz Schneider, Iracilda Sampaio, Horacio Schneider, Michael J. Stanhope

    Abstract:

    As classificacoes tradicionais envolvendo os macacos da infraordem Platyrrhini, principalmente baseadas em caracteristicas morfologicas, tem sido contestadas por dados moleculares recentes. A subfamilia Callitrichinae (Platyrrhine, Primates) engloba um diverso grupo de especies, muitas das quais consideradas em perigo de extincao. A presente analise de duas regioes do DNA, um gene mitocondrial (ND1) e um gene nuclear (regioes intronicas da transferrina), sugerem que Callithrix pygmaea apresenta variabilidade suficiente para justificar a existencia de subespecies ou ate mesmo de especies distintas. As arvores filogeneticas baseadas na regiao do ND1 indicam que esta especie esta relacionada mais proximamente aos marmosets amazonicos do que aos da mata Atlântica. Estes resultados reabrem a discussao sobre diversidade e programas de conservacao baseados apenas em classificacoes taxonomicas tradicionais.

  • a molecular analysis of the evolutionary relationships in the Callitrichinae with emphasis on the position of the dwarf marmoset
    Zoologica Scripta, 2012
    Co-Authors: Horacio Schneider, Marcelo Vallinoto, Jose A R Bernardi, Divino Bruno Da Cunha, Claudia Helena Tagliaro, Steve F Ferrari, Iracilda Sampaio

    Abstract:

    Schneider, H., Bernardi, J. A. R., da Cunha, D. B., Tagliaro, C. H., Vallinoto, M., Ferrari, S. F. & Sampaio, I. (2012). A molecular analysis of the evolutionary relationships in the Callitrichinae, with emphasis on the position of the dwarf marmoset. —Zoologica Scripta, 41, 1–10. The phylogenetic relationships among the Neotropical primates of the subfamily Callitrichinae (marmosets and tamarins) are controversial, especially with regard to the proposal of a new marmoset genus, Callibella, based on the analysis of sequences of a single mitochondrial gene. In this study, we combine the fast-evolving mitochondrial Control Region with four nuclear regions containing Alu elements in an attempt to provide a more conclusive assessment of the phylogenetic relationships among the marmosets (Callithrix, Cebuella and Mico), with special attention to the validity of Callibella. A large, representative sample of specimens was obtained, which include all the recognized genera and principal morphological and geographic groupings. The results of the analysis indicate unequivocally the existence of three independent lineages, corresponding to the Atlantic Forest (Callithrix), Amazonian (Mico) and pygmy marmoset (Cebuella) groups. The evidence also confirms the monophyletic relationship of the dwarf marmoset (Callibella) with the Amazonian marmosets (Mico), which indicates conclusively that this taxon is a member of the genus Mico, upholding the original description of the species as Mico humilis.

Laurence Culot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Correction to: Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae)
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    In the original publication of the article, the scientific name of veined treefrog.

  • Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae)
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    We report on the predation of a veined treefrog ( Trachycephalus venulosus ) and an ocellated treefrog ( Itapotihyla langsdorffii ), both species with noxious skin secretions, by black lion tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysopygus ). The two predation events took place in Morro do Diabo State Park, an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeastern Brazil. The veined treefrog was removed from a tree hollow by an adult male, whereas the ocellated treefrog was caught on the ground after it jumped from the tree attempting to escape capture. The frogs were completely ingested and no food sharing occurred in either of the events. We did not observe any signs of irritation during the event or when the group was followed in the next day in either of the cases. These are the first reports of lion tamarins ingesting anurans with noxious secretions on the skin.

  • Correction to: Predation of treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae) with toxic skin secretions by the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus, Callitrichinae).
    Primates, 2020
    Co-Authors: Guilherme S T Garbino, Leonardo Henrique Silva, Rodrigo Gonçalves Amaral, Gabriela Cabral Rezende, Vinicius J. A. Pereira, Laurence Culot

    Abstract:

    : We report on the predation of a veined treefrog (Trachycephalus venulosus) and an ocellated treefrog (Itapotihyla langsdorffii), both species with noxious skin secretions, by black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus). The two predation events took place in Morro do Diabo State Park, an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeastern Brazil. The veined treefrog was removed from a tree hollow by an adult male, whereas the ocellated treefrog was caught on the ground after it jumped from the tree attempting to escape capture. The frogs were completely ingested and no food sharing occurred in either of the events. We did not observe any signs of irritation during the event or when the group was followed in the next day in either of the cases. These are the first reports of lion tamarins ingesting anurans with noxious secretions on the skin.