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Cambridge School

The Experts below are selected from a list of 318 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Liz Wetherill – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The ‘Students As Researchers’ projec ® at Sharnbrook Upper School and Community College
    Improving Schools, 1998
    Co-Authors: Liz Wetherill

    Abstract:

    Liz Wetherill is a sixth form student who became involved in the research work taking place in her Schools as part of the IQEA project (improving the Quality of Education for All) supported by the University of Cambridge School of Education. In this article she reflects on her experiences as a student researcher.

  • the students as researchers projec at sharnbrook upper School and community college
    Improving Schools, 1998
    Co-Authors: Liz Wetherill

    Abstract:

    Liz Wetherill is a sixth form student who became involved in the research work taking place in her Schools as part of the IQEA project (improving the Quality of Education for All) supported by the University of Cambridge School of Education. In this article she reflects on her experiences as a student researcher.

Richard Byers – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The National Literacy Strategy and Pupils with Special Educational Needs.
    British Journal of Special Education, 2003
    Co-Authors: Richard Byers

    Abstract:

    Richard Byers, an independent consultant on curriculum development for pupils with learning difficulties, and a part-time lecturer in special educational needs at the University of Cambridge School of Education, considers the effectiveness of the National Literacy Strategy and the relevance of recent guidance.

  • Focus on Practice: Experience and Achievement: Initiatives in Curriculum Development for Pupils with Severe and Profound and Multiple Learning Difficuties
    British Journal of Special Education, 2003
    Co-Authors: Richard Byers

    Abstract:

    Richard Byers, education consultant and part-time lecturer at the University of Cambridge School of Education, challenges recent thinking on the teaching of subjects to pupils with learning difficulties. He emphasises that School-centred and innovative practices in curriculum development should be fully recognised and the role of experience and achievement thoroughly explored.

  • What Happens after the Age of 14? Mapping Transitions for Pupils with Profound and Complex Learning Difficulties.
    British Journal of Special Education, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lani Florian, Richard Byers, Liz Maudslay

    Abstract:

    This article reports on part one of a three-part national survey of provision for pupils aged 14 and older, in England and Wales, who have profound and complex learning difficulties. The survey is part of the Enhancing the Quality of Life (EqoL), a three-year research project jointly awarded to Skill: the National Bureau for Students with Disabilities, and the University of Cambridge School of Education. The aim of the project is to construct a framework for learning which will support improvements in the quality of life for these young people. It is funded by the National Lottery Charities Board.

Richard Whatmore – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Global possibilities in intellectual history : a note on practice
    Global Intellectual History, 2017
    Co-Authors: Knud Haakonssen, Richard Whatmore

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTIntellectual history, and especially the branch sometimes identified as the Cambridge School, continues to be criticized for not being sufficiently global in outlook. This article does not …

  • Cambridge School of intellectual history
    International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition), 2015
    Co-Authors: Richard Whatmore

    Abstract:

    The Cambridge School of Intellectual History is most associated with the work of Quentin Skinner and John Pocock, but encompasses the work of a number of scholars of political thought and political philosophy who have had connections with the University of Cambridge from the 1950s to the present. Members of the Cambridge School, who now teach at institutions of higher education across the globe, share a commitment to the historical study of texts, and reject approaches characterized by presentism and teleology (labeled prolepsis). They also reject canons of dominant authors and histories of philosophy that evaluate past ideas. Members of the Cambridge School have accordingly been in the vanguard of a historical turn in the study of past politics and ideas more generally, alongside the similarly historically minded approach, albeit distinctive methodologically, of Begriffsgeschichte or Conceptual History pioneered by Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck. Beyond a belief in the need to establish a context for the understanding of historical texts, and distaste for grand or theory-inspired narratives, the members of the Cambridge School have conflicting views of the origins and nature of modern political thought. This is illustrated through a comparison of the work of Skinner and Pocock.

  • intellectual history and the history of political thought
    palgrave advances in intellectual history, 2006
    Co-Authors: Richard Whatmore

    Abstract:

    R. G. Collingwood’s description of the difference between the ‘inside’ and ‘outside’ of an event had profound implications for historians of political thought in the 1960s, when it played a role in inspiring the articulation of the approach to intellectual history that has come to be known as that of ‘the Cambridge School’.2 Collingwood’s choice of the example of Ceasar’s death at the hands of assassins seeking to save the republic was fortuitous, in so far as the work of those associated with the Cambridge School has heavily contributed to a remarkable upsurge of interest in republicanism as an historical tradition of political argument.3 Much has been written about this development since the publication of John Pocock’s The Machiavellian Moment in 1975 and Quentin Skinner’s The Foundations of Modern Political Thought in 1978; with the recent appearance of reassessments of historical republicanism by these authors, a re-evaluation of the subject is timely.