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Cross-Sectional Studies

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Cross-Sectional Studies - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Shane N White - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • prevalence of periapical radiolucency and root canal treatment a systematic review of cross sectional Studies
    Journal of Endodontics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Jacly G Pak, Sara Fayazi, Shane N White
    Abstract:

    Abstract Introduction Cross-Sectional Studies describe the health status of a population and measure the prevalence of disease or treatment. Neither the prevalence of periapical radiolucency, a surrogate for disease, nor the prevalence of root canal treatment have been subjected to a systematic review, which is the highest level of clinical evidence. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of periapical radiolucency and nonsurgical root canal treatment. Methods Inclusion/exclusion criteria were used for defined searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE. Title lists were scanned and abstracts were read to determine utility. Articles meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria were analyzed for heterogeneity. Weighted mean percentages were calculated for the prevalence of overall periapical radiolucency, root canal treatment, and apical radiolucency in both treated and untreated teeth. Results Defined searching produced 11,491 titles. Thirty-three articles were included. Most patient samples represented modern populations from countries with high or very high human development indices. Meta-analysis was performed on 300,861 teeth. Of these, 5% had periapical radiolucencies, and 10% were endodontically treated. Of the 28,881 endodontically treated teeth, 36% had periapical radiolucencies; however, Cross-Sectional Studies cannot distinguish between healing and failing cases. Of the 271,980 untreated teeth, 2% had periapical radiolucencies. The technical quality of root canal treatment was decried by most authors of the included Studies. Conclusions The prevalence of periapical radiolucency was very high, broadly equivalent to 1 radiolucency per patient. The prevalence of teeth with root canal treatment was very high, broadly equivalent to 2 treatments per patient. Billions of teeth are retained through root canal treatment.

Lars Doelken - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash
    Abstract:

    Background The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. Methods This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. Results Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). Discussion Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash, Effrossyni Gkraniaklotsas
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. METHODS: This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. RESULTS: Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). DISCUSSION: Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.

I. E. Erkoyun - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Cross-Sectional Studies and methodology.
    Osteoporosis International, 2012
    Co-Authors: I. E. Erkoyun
    Abstract:

    Dear Sir, As I read the study by Patil et al. [1], I noticed that they have not stated several important points; in the methods section, the authors did not state the number of participants they contacted or the method used (telephone or direct interview?). Did they contact all of the study universe? There are 400 participants but as the authors have not estimated the exact number using appropriate epidemiologic formulas we cannot estimate the number required. In a Cross-Sectional study, sample size is an important part of study design, and without knowing the exact sample size interpretation of the results becomes almost impossible. Furthermore, the facilities or the means participants utilized in order to come and take the diagnostic test (DEX study) was not noted, which precludes ruling out the possibility that disabled participants did not come in for diagnostic tests. The same concern is true of economic status; information regarding the socio-economic status of participants is missing and therefore there is a possibility that participants were wealthier than non-participants. Although Cross-Sectional Studies are not the best type of study for finding causal relationships, in my opinion the points mentioned above should also be considered and included. As populations get older we must focus on the elderly, keeping in mind that preventing disabilities is a good target. If sarcopenia can be used predict disabilities, by all means we have to find out its social impact. Therefore, research into sarcopenia should take into account epidemiologic methodology.

Charlotte Warrengash - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash
    Abstract:

    Background The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. Methods This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. Results Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). Discussion Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash, Effrossyni Gkraniaklotsas
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. METHODS: This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. RESULTS: Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). DISCUSSION: Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.

Harriet Forbes - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash
    Abstract:

    Background The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. Methods This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. Results Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). Discussion Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.

  • risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection and reactivation cross sectional Studies among epic norfolk participants
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Harriet Forbes, Ben Warne, Lars Doelken, Nicole Brenner, Tim Waterboer, Robert Luben, Nicholas J Wareham, Charlotte Warrengash, Effrossyni Gkraniaklotsas
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of, and risk factors for, herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection and reactivation in older individuals are poorly understood. METHODS: This is a prospective population-based study among community-dwelling individuals aged 40-79 years, followed from 1993, formed as a random subsample of the UK-based EPIC-Norfolk cohort. HSV-1 seropositivity was derived from immunoglobulin G measurements and frequent oro-labial HSV reactivation was self-reported. We carried out two Cross-Sectional Studies using logistic regression to investigate childhood social and environmental conditions as risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity and comorbidities as risk factors for apparent HSV oro-labial reactivation. RESULTS: Of 9,929 participants, 6310 (63.6%) were HSV-1 IgG positive, and 870 (of 4,934 seropositive participants with reactivation data) experienced frequent oro-labial reactivation. Being born outside the UK/Ireland, contemporaneous urban living and having ≥4 siblings were risk factors for HSV-1 seropositivity. Ever diagnosed with kidney disease, but no other comorbidities, was associated with an increased risk of frequent HSV reactivation (adjOR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.40). DISCUSSION: Apparent HSV-1 seropositivity and clinical reactivation are common within an ageing UK population. HSV-1 seropositivity is socially patterned while risk factors for oro-labial HSV reactivation are less clear. Further large Studies of risk factors are needed to inform HSV-1 control strategies.