Emphysema

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Mark E. Ginsburg - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lung Volume Reduction Surgery - Lung volume reduction surgery
    British Journal of Surgery, 2002
    Co-Authors: Michael Argenziano, Mark E. Ginsburg
    Abstract:

    Part I. Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, and Medical Management of Emphysema The Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Emphysema Neil W. Schluger and Jeanine D'Armiento Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in the Evaluation of the Patient with Emphysema David Balfe and Zab Mohsenifar Cardiovascular Effects of Emphysema Steven M. Scharf Radiologic Assessment of Emphysema in LVRS Candidates John H. M. Austin, Gregory D. N. Pearson, Maria C. Shiau, and Yahya M. Berkmen Medical Management of Emphysema and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Chun K. Yip Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Severe Emphysema Matthew N. Bartels Part II. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery for Emphysema The History of Surgery for Emphysema Joseph J. DeRose, Jr. and Kenneth M. Steinglass Lung Volume Reduction Surgery: Open Technique Antonio L. Visbal, Claude Deschamps, and James P. Utz Lung Volume Reduction Surgery: Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Approaches Joshua R. Sonett and Mark J. Krasna Anesthetic Management of the Patient Undergoing Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Ellise S. Delphin Perioperative and Nursing Care of the LVRS Patient Patricia A. Jellen and Frances Brogan Selection of Candidates for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Byron Thomashow Clinical Results and Clinical Trials in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Charles W. Hoopes and Mark D. Iannettoni Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery on Survival in Patients with Advanced Emphysema Michael Argenziano, Lyall A. Gorenstein, and Mark E. Ginsburg Management of the Patient with Lung Cancer and Severe Emphysema Joseph J. DeRose, Jr., Michael Argenziano, and Mark E. Ginsburg Lung Transplantation and LVRS in the Treatment of Advanced Emphysema Larry L. Schulman

Michael Argenziano - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lung Volume Reduction Surgery - Lung volume reduction surgery
    British Journal of Surgery, 2002
    Co-Authors: Michael Argenziano, Mark E. Ginsburg
    Abstract:

    Part I. Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, and Medical Management of Emphysema The Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Emphysema Neil W. Schluger and Jeanine D'Armiento Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in the Evaluation of the Patient with Emphysema David Balfe and Zab Mohsenifar Cardiovascular Effects of Emphysema Steven M. Scharf Radiologic Assessment of Emphysema in LVRS Candidates John H. M. Austin, Gregory D. N. Pearson, Maria C. Shiau, and Yahya M. Berkmen Medical Management of Emphysema and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Chun K. Yip Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Severe Emphysema Matthew N. Bartels Part II. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery for Emphysema The History of Surgery for Emphysema Joseph J. DeRose, Jr. and Kenneth M. Steinglass Lung Volume Reduction Surgery: Open Technique Antonio L. Visbal, Claude Deschamps, and James P. Utz Lung Volume Reduction Surgery: Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Approaches Joshua R. Sonett and Mark J. Krasna Anesthetic Management of the Patient Undergoing Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Ellise S. Delphin Perioperative and Nursing Care of the LVRS Patient Patricia A. Jellen and Frances Brogan Selection of Candidates for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Byron Thomashow Clinical Results and Clinical Trials in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Charles W. Hoopes and Mark D. Iannettoni Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery on Survival in Patients with Advanced Emphysema Michael Argenziano, Lyall A. Gorenstein, and Mark E. Ginsburg Management of the Patient with Lung Cancer and Severe Emphysema Joseph J. DeRose, Jr., Michael Argenziano, and Mark E. Ginsburg Lung Transplantation and LVRS in the Treatment of Advanced Emphysema Larry L. Schulman

John D Newell - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • pulmonary Emphysema subtypes on computed tomography the mesa copd study
    The American Journal of Medicine, 2014
    Co-Authors: Benjamin M Smith, Eric A Hoffman, John H M Austin, John D Newell, Belinda Dsouza, Anna Rozenshtein, Firas S Ahmed, Graham R Barr
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Pulmonary Emphysema is divided into 3 major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular Emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of Emphysema subtypes on CT are not well defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of Emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if Emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and controls ages 50-79 years with ≥10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular Emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Results Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had Emphysema on CT. Interrater reliability of Emphysema subtype was substantial (K: 0.70). Compared with participants without Emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular Emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with paraseptal Emphysema were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular, but not panlobular or paraseptal, Emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years P 2 ; P  = .01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had Emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Conclusions Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular Emphysema, but not paraseptal Emphysema, have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences.

  • CT of Emphysema
    Radiologic clinics of North America, 2002
    Co-Authors: John D Newell
    Abstract:

    This article focuses on three main topics: (1) the importance of Emphysema as a serious respiratory disease, (2) qualitative assessment of Emphysema using CT, and (3) the emerging importance of quantitative CT in the evaluation of patients with Emphysema for surgery and drug therapy. CT also can identify the major anatomic subtypes of Emphysema. CT is critical in the assessment of patients with the potential for lung volume reduction surgery. CT may well be superior to pulmonary function tests in the longitudinal assessment of current and proposed drug therapies for the treatment of Emphysema.

Benjamin M Smith - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • generative method to discover Emphysema subtypes with unsupervised learning using lung macroscopic patterns lmps the mesa copd study
    International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jingkuan Song, Benjamin M Smith, Jie Yang, Pallavi Balte, Eric A Hoffman, Graham R Barr, Andrew F Laine, Elsa D Angelini
    Abstract:

    Pulmonary Emphysema overlaps considerably with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and is traditionally subcategorized into three subtypes: centrilobular Emphysema (CLE), panlobular Emphysema (PLE) and paraseptal Emphysema (PSE). Automated classification methods based on supervised learning are generally based upon the current definition of Emphysema subtypes, while unsupervised learning of texture patterns enables the objective discovery of possible new radiological Emphysema subtypes. In this work, we use a variant of the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model to discover lung macroscopic patterns (LMPs) in an unsupervised way from lung regions that encode Emphysematous areas. We evaluate the possible utility of the LMPs as potential novel Emphysema subtypes via measuring their level of reproducibility when varying the learning set and by their ability to predict traditional radiological Emphysema subtypes. Experimental results show that our algorithm can discover highly reproducible LMPs, that predict traditional Emphysema subtypes.

  • pulmonary Emphysema subtypes on computed tomography the mesa copd study
    The American Journal of Medicine, 2014
    Co-Authors: Benjamin M Smith, Eric A Hoffman, John H M Austin, John D Newell, Belinda Dsouza, Anna Rozenshtein, Firas S Ahmed, Graham R Barr
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Pulmonary Emphysema is divided into 3 major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular Emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of Emphysema subtypes on CT are not well defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of Emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if Emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and controls ages 50-79 years with ≥10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular Emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Results Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had Emphysema on CT. Interrater reliability of Emphysema subtype was substantial (K: 0.70). Compared with participants without Emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular Emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with paraseptal Emphysema were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular, but not panlobular or paraseptal, Emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years P 2 ; P  = .01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had Emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Conclusions Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular Emphysema, but not paraseptal Emphysema, have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences.

  • Emphysema detected on computed tomography and risk of lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam Netherlands), 2012
    Co-Authors: Benjamin M Smith, Lancelot Pinto, Nicole Ezer, Shigeo Muro, Nicola Sverzellati, Kevin Schwartzman
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Studies exploring the association between Emphysema detected on chest computed tomography (CT) and lung cancer have yielded mixed results. Our objective was to systematically review the evidence for this association. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library for the terms "lung cancer", "Emphysema" and "computed tomography" without language restriction. Bibliographies were also reviewed and authors contacted for additional information. Human studies in which CTs were performed and assessed for Emphysema and in which subjects were evaluated systematically for lung cancer were included. Qualitative synthesis of evidence was performed followed by pooling of effect estimates using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Of 187 citations, 7 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 5 in the meta-analysis. Three studies assessing Emphysema visually observed an association with lung cancer, independent of smoking history and airflow obstruction. Three studies using densitometry to detect Emphysema found no association with lung cancer. Another study directly comparing automated and visual Emphysema detection techniques found only the latter to associate with lung cancer. Among 7368 subjects included in the meta-analysis, 2809 had Emphysema on CT and 870 were diagnosed with lung cancer. The pooled adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer in the presence of Emphysema on CT was 2.11 (95% CI 1.10-4.04); stratification by detection method yielded OR of 3.50 (95% CI 2.71-4.51) with visually detected Emphysema and 1.16 (95% CI 0.48-2.81) with densitometric Emphysema. CONCLUSION: Systematic literature review shows Emphysema detected visually on CT to be independently associated with increased odds of lung cancer. This association did not hold with automated Emphysema detection.

Michael N. Y. Hoe - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Traumatic epidural Emphysema.
    Spine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Brian K.p. Goh, Michael N. Y. Hoe
    Abstract:

    Study Design. This is a case report. Objective. A rare case of epidural Emphysema secondary to traumatic pneumomediastinum in the absence of pneumothorax is reported. Summary of Background Data. Epidural air secondary to traumatic pneumomediastinum in the absence of pneumothorax has only been reported previously by Willing. Other causes of traumatic epidural Emphysema include pneumothorax, pelvic fracture, dural enteric fistula, and herniation of a spinal disc. Methods. A young man who sustained blunt cervical and chest trauma after a basketball game accident was found to have pneumomediastinum and surgical Emphysema on a chest radiograph and underwent computed tomography (CT). Results. The CT scan demonstrated surgical Emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and epidural Emphysema with no pneumothorax. The patient was managed conservatively, and the epidural Emphysema and pneumomediastinum resolved spontaneously. Conclusion. Epidural Emphysema secondary to traumatic pneumomediastinum is benign and self-limiting. However, the life-threatening causes should be considered and ruled out.