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Regenerated Cellulose

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Mat Uzir Wahit - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • graphene reinforced Regenerated Cellulose nanocomposite fibers prepared by lyocell process
    Polymer Composites, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shaya Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza Sazegar, Nazanin Afshari, Mat Uzir Wahit
    Abstract:

    Nanocomposites of Regenerated Cellulose containing different amounts of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) (0.5, 1 and 2 wt%) have been prepared by wet spinning using Lyocell process. The thermal stability, mechanical, and electrical properties of the nanocomposite fibers were studied. The nanocomposite fibers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tenacity and initial modulus of the nanocomposite fibers improved by 66% and 61%, respectively with the addition of 2 wt% GNPs. The T20 decomposition temperature of Regenerated Cellulose fibers improved with the addition of GNPs up to 2 wt%. The morphology by SEM revealed exfoliated dispersion of GNPs into the Regenerated Cellulose matrix which subsequently resulted in good interaction between the nanofillers and the matrix. The addition of exfoliated GNPs generated electrical conductivity. The nanocomposite fibers containing 2 wt% GNPs has a conductivity of 2.3 × 10−4 S/cm. The FTIR spectra showed that the addition of GNPs in Regenerated Cellulose did not result in any noticeable change in its chemical structure. The resulting nanocomposite may find potential applications in the areas of carbon fiber precursor, conductive fibers, electrical tools, and biodegradable composites. POLYM. COMPOS., 2015. © 2015 Society of Plastics Engineers

  • THERMAL AND FLEXURAL PROPERTIES OF Regenerated Cellulose(RC)/POLY(3-HYDROXYBUTYRATE)(PHB)BIOCOMPOSITES
    Jurnal Teknologi, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lee Chiau Yeng, Mat Uzir Wahit, Norhayani Othman
    Abstract:

    Regenerated Cellulose (RC)/ poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) composite was prepared via melt compounding with different RC contents from 1 to 7 wt.%. Regenerated Cellulose fiber was prepared in NaOH/urea aqueous solution. The properties of the Cellulose and the Regenerated Cellulose were compared using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of TGA and DSC revealed that the Regenerated Cellulose had lower thermal properties than Cellulose. Meanwhile, the FTIR of Regenerated Cellulose showed that the intensity portrayed by a few peaks had reduced or disappeared as compared to Cellulose. Besides, PHB composites were characterized using TGA and flexural testing. Moreover, thermal stability of the composites insignificantly changed with the incorporation of RC. Improvement in flexural strength and modulus were observed, whereas 3 wt.% was found to be the optimum RC content.

  • Bionanocomposites of Regenerated Cellulose/zeolite prepared using environmentally benign ionic liquid solvent
    Carbohydrate polymers, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Noel Ibrahim Akos, Wong Tuck Whye, Raheleh Heidar Pour, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf
    Abstract:

    Bionanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose (RC) and incorporated with zeolite at different concentrations were fabricated by dissolving Cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIMCl) ionic liquid using a simple green method. The interactions between the zeolite and the Cellulose matrix were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films significantly improved as compared with the pure Regenerated Cellulose film, without the loss of extensibility. Zeolite incorporation enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that zeolite was uniformly dispersed in the Regenerated Cellulose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both RC and RC/zeolite nanocomposite films are cytocompatible. These results indicate that the prepared nanocomposites have potential applications in biodegradable packaging, membranes and biomedical areas.

  • characterization of bio Regenerated Cellulose sepiolite nanocomposite films prepared via ionic liquid
    Polymer Testing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf, Mohammad A Alsaleh, Wong Tuck Whye
    Abstract:

    Novel Regenerated Cellulose/sepiolite (RC/SEP) nanocomposite films have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl), through a simple, cost effective and “green” method. The morphology, thermal stability and mechanical properties of these nanocomposite films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and mechanical testing. The results obtained revealed interactions between the sepiolite and Regenerated Cellulose. The FESEM and TEM results showed that sepiolite was uniformly dispersed in the RC matrix with contact between them. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were significantly improved compared to pure Regenerated Cellulose film, interestingly without loss of ductility. The presence of sepiolite enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites.

  • Development of Regenerated Cellulose/halloysite nanotube bionanocomposite films with ionic liquid.
    International journal of biological macromolecules, 2013
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit
    Abstract:

    In this study, novel nanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose/halloysite nanotube (RC/HNT) have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) through a simple green method. The structural, morphological, thermal and mechanical properties of the RC/HNT nanocomposites were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), thermal analysis and tensile strength measurements. The results obtained revealed interactions between the halloysite nanotubes and Regenerated Cellulose matrix. The thermal stability and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films, compared with pure Regenerated Cellulose film, were significantly improved When the halloysite nanotube (HNT) loading was only 2 wt.%, the 20% weight loss temperature (T20) increased 20 °C. The Young's modulus increased from 1.8 to 4.1 GPa, while tensile strength increased from 35.30 to 60.50 MPa when 8 wt.% halloysite nanotube (HNT) was incorporated, interestingly without loss of ductility. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved oxygen barrier properties and water absorption resistance compared to Regenerated Cellulose.

Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Bionanocomposites of Regenerated Cellulose/zeolite prepared using environmentally benign ionic liquid solvent
    Carbohydrate polymers, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Noel Ibrahim Akos, Wong Tuck Whye, Raheleh Heidar Pour, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf
    Abstract:

    Bionanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose (RC) and incorporated with zeolite at different concentrations were fabricated by dissolving Cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIMCl) ionic liquid using a simple green method. The interactions between the zeolite and the Cellulose matrix were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films significantly improved as compared with the pure Regenerated Cellulose film, without the loss of extensibility. Zeolite incorporation enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that zeolite was uniformly dispersed in the Regenerated Cellulose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both RC and RC/zeolite nanocomposite films are cytocompatible. These results indicate that the prepared nanocomposites have potential applications in biodegradable packaging, membranes and biomedical areas.

  • characterization of bio Regenerated Cellulose sepiolite nanocomposite films prepared via ionic liquid
    Polymer Testing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf, Mohammad A Alsaleh, Wong Tuck Whye
    Abstract:

    Novel Regenerated Cellulose/sepiolite (RC/SEP) nanocomposite films have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl), through a simple, cost effective and “green” method. The morphology, thermal stability and mechanical properties of these nanocomposite films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and mechanical testing. The results obtained revealed interactions between the sepiolite and Regenerated Cellulose. The FESEM and TEM results showed that sepiolite was uniformly dispersed in the RC matrix with contact between them. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were significantly improved compared to pure Regenerated Cellulose film, interestingly without loss of ductility. The presence of sepiolite enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites.

  • Development of Regenerated Cellulose/halloysite nanotube bionanocomposite films with ionic liquid.
    International journal of biological macromolecules, 2013
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit
    Abstract:

    In this study, novel nanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose/halloysite nanotube (RC/HNT) have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) through a simple green method. The structural, morphological, thermal and mechanical properties of the RC/HNT nanocomposites were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), thermal analysis and tensile strength measurements. The results obtained revealed interactions between the halloysite nanotubes and Regenerated Cellulose matrix. The thermal stability and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films, compared with pure Regenerated Cellulose film, were significantly improved When the halloysite nanotube (HNT) loading was only 2 wt.%, the 20% weight loss temperature (T20) increased 20 °C. The Young's modulus increased from 1.8 to 4.1 GPa, while tensile strength increased from 35.30 to 60.50 MPa when 8 wt.% halloysite nanotube (HNT) was incorporated, interestingly without loss of ductility. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved oxygen barrier properties and water absorption resistance compared to Regenerated Cellulose.

  • Regenerated Cellulose/epoxidized natural rubber blend film
    Materials Letters, 2013
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Noel Ibrahim Akos
    Abstract:

    Regenerated Cellulose/epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) blended films were prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl). The films were obtained by casting solution method. The hydrogen bonding interactions between epoxy groups in ENR with hydroxyl groups of the RC in the blends were investigated by Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed that ENR dispersed homogenously within the RC matrix. The blends show significant enhancement of thermal stability as compared to the Regenerated. The elongation at break remarkably improved by about 39% at 20 wt.% loading of ENR in dry state. This work demonstrates an effective approach to processing biodegradable Regenerated Cellulose and epoxidized natural rubber blend.

Lina Zhang - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • recent advances in Regenerated Cellulose materials
    Progress in Polymer Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Sen Wang, Lina Zhang
    Abstract:

    Abstract The dual threats of the depletion of nonrenewable energy and environmental pollution caused by petroleum-based polymers motivate utilization of naturally occurring polymers to create new materials. Cellulose, as the most abundant natural polymer on earth, has attracted attention due to its renewability, wide availability, low-cost, biocompatibility and biodegradability, etc. Regenerated Cellulose may be constructed simply via physical dissolution and regeneration, an environmentally friendly process avoiding the consuming of chemicals since most of the reagents (solvents, coagulant, etc. ) may be recycled and reused. “Green” solvents and techniques for the preparation of the environmentally friendly Regenerated Cellulose materials have been developed successfully, showing great potentials in the fields of polymer science and technology. In this article, the widely used non-derivatizing Cellulose solvents are summarized, including their dissolution mechanisms. Regenerated Cellulose materials with different functions and properties have been designed and fabricated in different forms, such as filaments, films/membranes, microspheres/beads, hydrogels/aerogels and bioplastics, etc. , to meet various demands. The concept of regeneration through a physical process is illustrated, and a number of novel Regenerated Cellulose materials are introduced for wide applications in textiles, packaging, biomedicine, water treatment, optical/electrical devices, agriculture and food, etc. The methodology of material processing and the resultant properties and functions are also covered in this review, with emphasis on the neat Regenerated Cellulose materials and the composite materials. The 277 references cited concerning the direct preparation of Cellulose materials via physical dissolution and regeneration are representative of the wide impact and benefits of the Regenerated Cellulose materials to society.

  • Properties of Regenerated Cellulose Short Fibers/Cellulose Green Composite Films
    Journal of Polymers and the Environment, 2011
    Co-Authors: A. Venu Nadhan, A. Varada Rajulu, C. Jie, Lina Zhang
    Abstract:

    Green composites of Regenerated Cellulose short fibers/Cellulose were prepared by dissolving Cellulose in a green solvent of 7% NaOH/12% Urea aqueous solution that was pre cooled at −12 °C. The effect of fiber loading on the tensile, optical, thermal degradation and cell viability was studied. The tensile properties of Cellulose were improved by the Regenerated Cellulose fiber reinforcement. The interfacial bonding between the fibers and matrix was assessed using the fractographs and found it to be good.

  • Biodegradability of Regenerated Cellulose Films in Soil
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 1996
    Co-Authors: Lina Zhang, Yumin Du, Lianshuang Zheng, Jiayao Zhang, Hanqiao Feng
    Abstract:

    Regenerated Cellulose films and a water-resistant film coated with thin Tung oil were prepared by using a Cellulose cuoxam solution from pulps of cotton linter, cotton stalk, and wheat straw. They were buried in the soil to test biodegradability. The results showed that viscosity average molecular weight Mη, tensile strength σb, and the weight of the degraded films decreased sharply with the progress of degradation time, and the kinetics of decay were discussed. The degradation half-lives t1/2 of the films in soil at 10−20 °C were given to be 30−42 days, and after 2 months the films were decomposed into CO2 and water. The α-Cellulose in soil was more readily biodegraded than hemiCellulose, and Regenerated Cellulose film was more readily biodegraded than kraft paper. Nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning electron micrographs indicated that the biodegradation process of the films was performed through random breakdown of bonds of Cellulose macromolecules resulting from the microorganism cleavage.

Wong Tuck Whye - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Bionanocomposites of Regenerated Cellulose/zeolite prepared using environmentally benign ionic liquid solvent
    Carbohydrate polymers, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Noel Ibrahim Akos, Wong Tuck Whye, Raheleh Heidar Pour, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf
    Abstract:

    Bionanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose (RC) and incorporated with zeolite at different concentrations were fabricated by dissolving Cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIMCl) ionic liquid using a simple green method. The interactions between the zeolite and the Cellulose matrix were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films significantly improved as compared with the pure Regenerated Cellulose film, without the loss of extensibility. Zeolite incorporation enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that zeolite was uniformly dispersed in the Regenerated Cellulose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both RC and RC/zeolite nanocomposite films are cytocompatible. These results indicate that the prepared nanocomposites have potential applications in biodegradable packaging, membranes and biomedical areas.

  • characterization of bio Regenerated Cellulose sepiolite nanocomposite films prepared via ionic liquid
    Polymer Testing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf, Mohammad A Alsaleh, Wong Tuck Whye
    Abstract:

    Novel Regenerated Cellulose/sepiolite (RC/SEP) nanocomposite films have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl), through a simple, cost effective and “green” method. The morphology, thermal stability and mechanical properties of these nanocomposite films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and mechanical testing. The results obtained revealed interactions between the sepiolite and Regenerated Cellulose. The FESEM and TEM results showed that sepiolite was uniformly dispersed in the RC matrix with contact between them. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were significantly improved compared to pure Regenerated Cellulose film, interestingly without loss of ductility. The presence of sepiolite enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites.

Abdirahman Ali Yussuf - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Bionanocomposites of Regenerated Cellulose/zeolite prepared using environmentally benign ionic liquid solvent
    Carbohydrate polymers, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Noel Ibrahim Akos, Wong Tuck Whye, Raheleh Heidar Pour, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf
    Abstract:

    Bionanocomposite films based on Regenerated Cellulose (RC) and incorporated with zeolite at different concentrations were fabricated by dissolving Cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIMCl) ionic liquid using a simple green method. The interactions between the zeolite and the Cellulose matrix were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films significantly improved as compared with the pure Regenerated Cellulose film, without the loss of extensibility. Zeolite incorporation enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that zeolite was uniformly dispersed in the Regenerated Cellulose matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated that both RC and RC/zeolite nanocomposite films are cytocompatible. These results indicate that the prepared nanocomposites have potential applications in biodegradable packaging, membranes and biomedical areas.

  • characterization of bio Regenerated Cellulose sepiolite nanocomposite films prepared via ionic liquid
    Polymer Testing, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Soheilmoghaddam, Mat Uzir Wahit, Abdirahman Ali Yussuf, Mohammad A Alsaleh, Wong Tuck Whye
    Abstract:

    Novel Regenerated Cellulose/sepiolite (RC/SEP) nanocomposite films have been prepared using an environmentally friendly ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl), through a simple, cost effective and “green” method. The morphology, thermal stability and mechanical properties of these nanocomposite films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and mechanical testing. The results obtained revealed interactions between the sepiolite and Regenerated Cellulose. The FESEM and TEM results showed that sepiolite was uniformly dispersed in the RC matrix with contact between them. Mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were significantly improved compared to pure Regenerated Cellulose film, interestingly without loss of ductility. The presence of sepiolite enhanced the thermal stability and char yield of the nanocomposites.