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AA Amyloidosis

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Helen J. Lachmann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Secondary, AA, Amyloidosis
    Rheumatic diseases clinics of North America, 2018
    Co-Authors: Riccardo Papa, Helen J. Lachmann
    Abstract:

    AA Amyloidosis, otherwise known as secondary Amyloidosis, is a complication of chronic inflinflammation. The amyloid fibrils are derived from the hepatic acute phase reactant, serum amylamyloid A protprotein. Clinically AA Amyloidosis has a predominantly renal presentation with proteinuria and renal impairment. Untreated disease will progress to end-stage renal failure. Treatment depends on complete control of the underlying chronic inflammatory condition, and if this can be achieved long-term outcomes are favourable. Median survival in patients with AA Amyloidosis now exceeds 12 years although renal failure eventually develops in more than 40%.

  • P02-019 – Detection of risk factors for AAAmyloidosis
    Pediatric Rheumatology, 2013
    Co-Authors: S Németh, Laura Obici, Helen J. Lachmann, S Grandemange, C Oberkanins
    Abstract:

    Systemic reactive (AA) Amyloidosis represents the most important complication within TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and other autoinflammatory syndromes, progressively leading to endstage renal failure. The homozygous condition of the serum amylamyloida> (SAA) variant SAA1.1 is significantly associated with the occurrence of AA Amyloidosis in TRAPS patients. Likewise in FMF patients the MEFV mutation c.2080A>G (M694V) correlates with Amyloidosis and the SAA1.1/SAA1.1 genotype increases clinical severity (age at disease onset, Amyloidosis, arthritis).

  • brief report AA Amyloidosis complicating the hereditary periodic fever syndromes
    Arthritis & Rheumatism, 2013
    Co-Authors: Thirusha Lane, Julian D. Gillmore, Ashutosh D. Wechalekar, Janet A. Gilbertson, Dorota Rowczenio, Philip N. Hawkins, J Loeffler, A Bybee, T Russell, Helen J. Lachmann
    Abstract:

    Objective AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPFS), which are otherwise often compatible with normal life expectancy. This study was undertaken to determine the characteristics, presentation, natural history, and response to treatment in 46 patients who had been referred for evaluation at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre. Methods Disease activity was monitored by serial measurement of serum amylamyloida>. Renal function was assessed by measurement of serum creatinine and albumin levels, the estimated glomerular filtfiltratione, and proteinuria from 24-hour urine collections. The amyloid load was measured by serum amylamyloida> scintigraphy. Results Twenty-four patients had familial Mediterranean fever, 12 patients had tumor necrnecrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome, 6 patients had cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, and 4 patients had mevalonate kinase deficiency. The median age at onset of HPFS was 5 years; median age at presentation with AA Amyloidosis was 38 years. Diagnosis of an HPFS had not been considered prior to presentation with AA Amyloidosis in 23 patients (50%). Eleven patients (24%) had end-stage renal failure (ESRF) at presentation; of these, 3 had received transplants prior to referral. A further 13 patients developed ESRF over the followup period, with 10 undergoing renal trantransplantation. The median time to progression to ESRF from onset of AA Amyloidosis was 3.3 years (interquartile range [IQR] 2–8), with a median time to transplant of 4 years (IQR 3–6). Eleven patients (24%) died. The median survival in the entire cohort was 19 years from diagnosis of AA Amyloidosis. Of the 37 patients who were treated successfully, or in whom at least partial suppression of the underlying HPFS was achieved, 17 (46%) showed amyloid regression, 14 (38%) showed a stable amyloid load, and 2 (5%) showed increased amyloid deposition over the followup period. Conclusion AA Amyloidosis remains a challenging and serious late complication of HPFS; however, outcomes are excellent when HPFS is diagnosed early enough to allow effective treatment, thus preventing or retarding further amyloid deposition and organ damage.

Shu-ichi Ikeda – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan
    Amyloid, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protprotein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protprotein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4–2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with ch…

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan.
    Amyloid : the international journal of experimental and clinical investigation : the official journal of the International Society of Amyloidosis, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protprotein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protprotein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4-2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and these patients at risk should avoid ingesting food that may possibly contain AA amyloid fibrils. More detailed information on cattle Amyloidosis is required to guarantee the safety of our food.

  • Fatal Acute Pancreatitis with Cystic Formation in Reactive Systemic AA Amyloidosis Secondary to Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Internal medicine (Tokyo Japan), 2003
    Co-Authors: Masayuki Matsuda, Shunpei Sakurai, Akio Suzuki, Masumi Kadoya, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    We report a patient with reactive systemic AA Amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis who showed fatal acute pancpancreatitis with a cystic formation in the pancreas head. The pancreatitis rapidly worsened despite intensive treatment and resulted in death. In this patient severe deposition of amyloid in the gastrointestinal tract was considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the acute pancpancreatitis. This is an unusual complication in patients with AA Amyloidosis, but we should consider it as a possible diagnosis when patients with AA Amyloidosis show recurrent or intractable pain in the upper abdomen.

Fuyuki Kametani – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fecal transmission of AA Amyloidosis in the cheetah contributes to high incidence of disease.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2008
    Co-Authors: Beiru Zhang, Yumi Une, Jingmin Yan, Junjie Yao, Jinko Sawashita, Masayuki Mori, Hiroshi Tomozawa, Fuyuki Kametani
    Abstract:

    AA Amyloidosis is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which are in danger of extinction, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Given the transmissible characteristics of AA Amyloidosis, transmission between captive cheetahs may be a possible mechanism involved in the high incidence of AA Amyloidosis. In this study of animals with AA Amyloidosis, we found that cheetah feces contained AA amyloid fibrils that were different from those of the liver with regard to molecular weight and shape and had greater transmissibility. The infectious activity of fecal AA amyloid fibrils was reduced or abolished by the protein denaturants 6 M guanidine·HCl and formic acid or by AA immunodepletion. Thus, we propose that feces are a vehicle of transmission that may accelerate AA Amyloidosis in captive cheetah populations. These results provide a pathogenesis for AA Amyloidosis and suggest possible measures for rescuing cheetahs from extinction.

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan
    Amyloid, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4–2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with ch…

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan.
    Amyloid : the international journal of experimental and clinical investigation : the official journal of the International Society of Amyloidosis, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4-2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and these patients at risk should avoid ingesting food that may possibly contain AA amyloid fibrils. More detailed information on cattle Amyloidosis is required to guarantee the safety of our food.

Kana Tojo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan
    Amyloid, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4–2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with ch…

  • Unexpectedly high incidence of visceral AAAmyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in Japan.
    Amyloid : the international journal of experimental and clinical investigation : the official journal of the International Society of Amyloidosis, 2005
    Co-Authors: Kana Tojo, Takahiko Tokuda, Yoshinobu Hoshii, Keiichi Higuchi, Takane Matsui, Fuyuki Kametani, Shu-ichi Ikeda
    Abstract:

    Experimental mouse AA Amyloidosis can be transmissible by dietary ingestion of amyloid fibrils and it is well known that AA Amyloidosis occasionally develops in aged cattle. Bovine liver and intestine have conventionally been used in Oriental foods, and the incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle was evaluated. Renal tissues from 302 aged cattle older than 4 years were obtained from a local abattoir. Amyloid deposition was microscopically examined and amyloid protein was immunochemically determined. Renal amyloid deposition was seen in 15 out of 302 cattle with no previous history of diseas, an incidence of 5.0%. Amyloid protein in these cattle was AA and they had pathological findings in their visceral organs on gross examination. The incidence of visceral AA Amyloidosis in slaughtered cattle in this study was disturbingly high compared with those (0.4-2.7%) previously reported from Japan and other foreign countries. AA Amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and these patients at risk should avoid ingesting food that may possibly contain AA amyloid fibrils. More detailed information on cattle Amyloidosis is required to guarantee the safety of our food.

Naotaka Ishiguro – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.