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Masakazu Inoue – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serological properties of Abiotrophia and Granulicatella species (nutritionally variant streptococci).
    Microbiology and immunology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Katsuhiro Kitada, Yasuko Okada, Taisei Kanamoto, Masakazu Inoue
    Abstract:

    Serological variations were examined among 12 type or reference strains and 91 oral isolates of vitamin B6-dependent Abiotrophia and Granulicatella spp. Rabbits were immunized with whole cells of 12 selected strains and 10 typing antisera were obtained, which were unreactive with the Lancefield group A to G antigen preparations. The reactivity of the antisera and autoclaved cell surface antigen extracts was tested by double diffusion in agar gel and a capillary precipitin test. These typing antisera categorized all Abiotrophia defectiva strains, all except one Granulicatella elegans strain, three-quarters of the Granulicatella adiacens, and half of the Granulicatella paraadiacens into 8 serotypes and 2 subserotypes. The Granulicatella balaenopterae type strain was unserotypable. All A. defectiva strains were serotype I, some of which were divided into subserotype I-1 and/or I-5. The G. adiacens strains generally belonged to serotype II or III, and the G. paraadiacens strains to serotype IV, V or VI. All G. adiacens or G. paraadiacens serotype II strains were also subserotype I-5. The G. elegans strains were serotype VII or VIII. These Abiotrophia and Granulicatella serotypes were undetectable among 33 strains of the other 11 species including the bacteriolytic enzyme-producing but vitamin B6-independent strains of Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Dolosigranulum and Aerococcus. The proposed serotyping system for Abiotrophia and Granulicatella spp. would be helpful in the identification and classification of these unique coccal isolates in ecological and epidemiological studies.

  • Endocardiac infectivity and binding to extracellular matrix proteins of oral Abiotrophia species
    FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Yasuko Okada, Katsuhiro Kitada, Masaru Takagaki, Hiro-o Ito, Masakazu Inoue
    Abstract:

    Microorganisms of the genus Abiotrophia, formerly known as nutritionally variant streptococci, are members of the oral flora and often isolated from patients with endocarditis, but pathogenicity of oral Abiotrophia species has not been examined yet. In this study, 17 strains isolated from healthy human oral cavities and 7 reference strains (all derived from patients with endocarditis) of Abiotrophia spp. were tested for their abilities to cause infections in damaged heart tissues in catheterized rats and to adhere to extracellular matrix protproteins in vitro. The reference strains of A. defectiva and A. adiacens showed high infectivities in the rats. Four oral isolates of these two species showed similarly high infectivities and three had moderate infectivities. Most of 10 oral strains of A. para-adiacens and A. elegans were found to be generally less infective. The highly infective A. adiacens strains showed markedly high fibronectin-binding capacity, suggesting a possible relationship between the fibronectin-binding capacity and damaged heart tissue infectivity of the Abiotrophia species. A. defectiva strains which were also highly infective had moderate levels of binding to fibronectin and other extracellular matrix protproteins. Most of A. para-adiacens and A. elegans strains showed low or negligible binding capacities to any extracellular matrix protproteins tested.

  • Genetic heterogeneities and phenotypic characteristics of strains of the genus Abiotrophia and proposal of Abiotrophia para-adiacens sp. nov
    Journal of clinical microbiology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Taisei Kanamoto, Setsuko Sato, Masakazu Inoue
    Abstract:

    The genus Abiotrophia represents a heterogeneous group of fastidious cocci that show a dependence on pyridoxal hydrochloride analogs for growth. The genetic heterogeneity in the genus Abiotrophia was examined by DNA-DNA DNA hybrhybridization, PCR assay of genomic DNA sequences, and restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence homology analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Nine type or reference strains of Abiotrophia defectiva, Abiotrophia adiacens, and Abiotrophia elegans and 36 oral Abiotrophia isolates including the ones presumptively identified as Gemella morbillorum by the rapid ID32 STREP system were divided into four groups: A. defectiva (genotype 1), A. adiacens (genotype 2), A. elegans (genotype 4), and a fourth species (genotype 3) which we propose be named Abiotrophia para-adiacens sp. nov. A PCR assay specific for detection and identification of the novel Abiotrophia species was developed. A. para-adiacens generally produced beta-glucosidase but did not produce alpha- or beta-galactosidase or arginine dihydrolase, did not ferment, trehalose, pullulan, or tagatose, and was serotype IV, V, or VI. Thus, it was distinguished phenotypically from A. adiacens, A. elegans, and A. defectiva as well as, apparently, from the recently described species Abiotrophia balaenopterae sp. nov., which produces arginine dihydrolase and which ferments pullulan but not sucrose (P. A. Lawson et al., Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49:503-506, 1999). Strain ATCC 27527, currently listed as G. morbillorum, was a member of the species A. para-adiacens.

Jürgen Heesemann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • PCR for detection and identification of Abiotrophia spp.
    Journal of clinical microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andreas Roggenkamp, Lorenz Leitritz, Kerstin Baus, Enevold Falsen, Jürgen Heesemann
    Abstract:

    Members of the genus Abiotrophia, formerly known as nutritionally variant streptococci, are important pathogens causing septicemia and endocarditis. Cultivation and biochemical differentiation of Abiotrophia spp. are often difficult. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, two PCR assays for detection and identification of Abiotrophia spp. were developed. The first PCR assay was positive for all Abiotrophia spp. Subsequently performed restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis allowed the verification of the PCR amplicons and the differentiation of the three species. The second PCR assay was positive only for A. elegans, the most fastidious species of Abiotrophia. Both PCR assays were shown to be specific and sensitive and should facilitate the identification of Abiotrophia spp.

  • Abiotrophia elegans sp. nov., a Possible Pathogen in Patients with Culture-Negative Endocarditis
    Journal of clinical microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andreas Roggenkamp, Marianne Abele-horn, Karlheinz Trebesius, Ursula Tretter, Ingo B. Autenrieth, Jürgen Heesemann
    Abstract:

    We isolated a hitherto undescribed microorganism from a patient with endocarditis. The microscopic appearance, a negative catalase reaction, and growth as satellite colonies next to Staphylococcus epidepidermidis suggested that this microorganism is a member of the genus Abiotrophia, formerly known as nutritionally variant streptococci. However, the clinical isolate described herein differed markedly from the known Abiotrophia spp., A. adiacens and A. defectiva, in terms of its (i) biochemical properties, (ii) restricted growth temperature range, (iii) whole-cell lysate polypeptide profile, and (iv) unique nutritional requirements. In contrast to the type strains of A. adiacens and A. defectiva, which used l-cysteine and pyridoxal hydrochloride as growth factors, the growth of the clinical isolate was only supported by l-cysteine hydrochloride and not by pyridoxal hydrochloride when the organism was tested in Todd-Hewitt or casein-soy peptone broth. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the microorganism was a member of the genus Abiotrophia and was most closely related to A. adiacens (96.9% homology). Phenotypic and phylogenetic data are consistent with the assumption of a new species within the genus Abiotrophia, for which we propose the name Abiotrophia elegans sp. nov. The unique nutritional requirements of this strain are of importance for diagnostic laboratories. The media of blood culture systems supplemented only with pyridoxal hydrochloride as a growth factor may fail to promote the growth of A. elegans sp. nov., and thus, these systems might not detect this microorganism as a possible cause of endocarditis.

Andreas Roggenkamp – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • PCR for detection and identification of Abiotrophia spp.
    Journal of clinical microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andreas Roggenkamp, Lorenz Leitritz, Kerstin Baus, Enevold Falsen, Jürgen Heesemann
    Abstract:

    Members of the genus Abiotrophia, formerly known as nutritionally variant streptococci, are important pathogens causing septicemia and endocarditis. Cultivation and biochemical differentiation of Abiotrophia spp. are often difficult. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, two PCR assays for detection and identification of Abiotrophia spp. were developed. The first PCR assay was positive for all Abiotrophia spp. Subsequently performed restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis allowed the verification of the PCR amplicons and the differentiation of the three species. The second PCR assay was positive only for A. elegans, the most fastidious species of Abiotrophia. Both PCR assays were shown to be specific and sensitive and should facilitate the identification of Abiotrophia spp.

  • Abiotrophia elegans sp. nov., a Possible Pathogen in Patients with Culture-Negative Endocarditis
    Journal of clinical microbiology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andreas Roggenkamp, Marianne Abele-horn, Karlheinz Trebesius, Ursula Tretter, Ingo B. Autenrieth, Jürgen Heesemann
    Abstract:

    We isolated a hitherto undescribed microorganism from a patient with endocarditis. The microscopic appearance, a negative catalase reaction, and growth as satellite colonies next to Staphylococcus epidermidis suggested that this microorganism is a member of the genus Abiotrophia, formerly known as nutritionally variant streptococci. However, the clinical isolate described herein differed markedly from the known Abiotrophia spp., A. adiacens and A. defectiva, in terms of its (i) biochemical properties, (ii) restricted growth temperature range, (iii) whole-cell lysate polypeptide profile, and (iv) unique nutritional requirements. In contrast to the type strains of A. adiacens and A. defectiva, which used l-cysteine and pyridoxal hydrochloride as growth factors, the growth of the clinical isolate was only supported by l-cysteine hydrochloride and not by pyridoxal hydrochloride when the organism was tested in Todd-Hewitt or casein-soy peptone broth. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the microorganism was a member of the genus Abiotrophia and was most closely related to A. adiacens (96.9% homology). Phenotypic and phylogenetic data are consistent with the assumption of a new species within the genus Abiotrophia, for which we propose the name Abiotrophia elegans sp. nov. The unique nutritional requirements of this strain are of importance for diagnostic laboratories. The media of blood culture systems supplemented only with pyridoxal hydrochloride as a growth factor may fail to promote the growth of A. elegans sp. nov., and thus, these systems might not detect this microorganism as a possible cause of endocarditis.

Wim Ang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

M. Russlies – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.