Academic Buildings - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Academic Buildings

The Experts below are selected from a list of 306 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Academic Buildings – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Fort Hays State University – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Tiger Daily: February 6, 2020
    FHSU Scholars Repository, 2020
    Co-Authors: Fort Hays State University
    Abstract:

    ANNOUNCEMENTS Upgrade of Polycom PhonesSmoky Hill Chorale – Spring 2020 Be the Match Volunteers Calendar: Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities University Photo Open Studio Dates Faculty Applications for Summer Grants for Research, Creative, or Grants Activity Now Being Accepted Academic Advising Training, Certificates, and Webinars Ceramica Clay Club Hosting Visiting Artist Ariel Bowman Interested in Crowdfunding?VIP Ambassador Program Seeking Candidates for 2020-21 Professional Development: Small Teaching Book Talk Faculty/Staff Pickleball Applications Now Open for the $500 Lynn Haggard Undergraduate Library Research Award Gallery Exhibition: Dredge the Foundry; for Dirt and Era Cost of Poverty Experience (COPE) Electronic Resource Feature: Academic Complete Tigers In Service Seeking Faculty/Staff Advisor for Alternative Spring Break to Grand Canyon Employment Opportunity – Full-Time Custodian, Academic Buildings EVENTS THIS WEEK/WEEKEND Heart Disease Fundraiser Table – TOMORROW; 11:00am to 1:00pm “Hope in the Heartland” – February 8; 10:00am to 2:00pm Free Community Meal – February 9; 5:30pm to 7:00pmFUTURE EVENTS Red Hand Day – February 11; 11:00am to 1:00pm Encore Series Presents – Fiesta Folclórico! – February 11; 7:30pm Times Talk: Vaping Injury Outbreak – February 12; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Valentines for Seniors – February 13; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Health & Wellness Career Fair – February 14; 9:30am to 11:30am Healthy Relationship Table – February 14; 11:00am to 1:00pm SAAC (Student Athlete Advisory Committee) Kids’ Night Out – February 14; 5:00pm to 8:00pm St. Joseph Food Pantry – February 15; 8:30am to 12:00pmHays Symphony FREE Valentine’s Concert – February 15; 7:30pm Presidents’ Day Table – February 17; 11:30am to 1:30pm TILTed Tech Mini-Conference: Assessment – February 18; 12:00pm to 3:00pm Times Talk: A Legacy of Hate Crime in the Current Time – February 19; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Jana’s Jewelry – February 21; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Times Talk: Evangelicals Unwavering Support for President Trump – February 25; 12:00pm to 1:00pm Research Speed Networking Event – February 26; 12:45pm to 3:00pm MDC Workshop – CliftonStrengths Engaged – February 27; 9:00am to 4:00pm Consent Rocks – February 27; 7:00pm to 8:00pm Thank a Woman Table – February 28; 11:00am to 1:00pm MDC Workshop – Closing the Generation Gap – March 3; 8:30am to 12:00pmSHARE WITH STUDENTS Men’s Glee Club and Women’s Chorale Department of Leadership Studies Spring Speaker Series Department of Leadership Studies VALUE Program Encore Series Volunteers Needed! Noyce Summer Scholar Program Interviewing 101 WorkshopAdams, Brown, Beran, & Ball Interview

  • Tiger Daily: February 7, 2020
    FHSU Scholars Repository, 2020
    Co-Authors: Fort Hays State University
    Abstract:

    ANNOUNCEMENTS Fresh Food Friday Upgrade of Polycom Phones Smoky Hill Chorale – Spring 2020 Calendar: Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities University Photo Open Studio Dates Faculty Applications for Summer Grants for Research, Creative, or Grants Activity Now Being Accepted Academic Advising Training, Certificates, and Webinars Ceramica Clay Club Hosting Visiting Artist Ariel Bowman Interested in Crowdfunding VIP Ambassador Program Seeking Candidates for 2020-21 Professional Development: Small Teaching Book Talk Applications Now Open for the $500 Lynn Haggard Undergraduate Library Research Award Gallery Exhibition: Dredge the Foundry; for Dirt and Era Cost of Poverty Experience (COPE) Electronic Resource Feature: Academic Complete Tigers In Service Seeking Faculty/Staff Advisor for Alternative Spring Break to Grand Canyon Employment Opportunity – Full-Time Custodian, Academic Buildings Join Us for a Mysterious Valentine’s Date FHSU 2nd Annual SoupFest Cook-Off Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Scholar EVENTS THIS WEEK/WEEKEND Heart Disease Fundraiser Table – TODAY; 11:00am to 1:00pm “Hope in the Heartland” – TOMORROW; 10:00am to 2:00pm Free Community Meal – February 9; 5:30pm to 7:00pm FUTURE EVENTS Red Hand Day – February 11; 11:00am to 1:00pm Encore Series Presents – Fiesta Folclórico! – February 11; 7:30pm Times Talk: Vaping Injury Outbreak – February 12; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Valentines for Seniors – February 13; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Health & Wellness Career Fair – February 14; 9:30am to 11:30am Healthy Relationship Table – February 14; 11:00am to 1:00pm SAAC (Student Athlete Advisory Committee) Kids’ Night Out – February 14; 5:00pm to 8:00pm Hays High School Chamber Singers and Jazz Combo – February 14 & 15; 7:30pm St. Joseph Food Pantry – February 15; 8:30am to 12:00pm Hays Symphony FREE Valentine’s Concert – February 15; 7:30pm Presidents’ Day Table – February 17; 11:30am to 1:30pm TILTed Tech Mini-Conference: Assessment – February 18; 12:00pm to 3:00pm Times Talk: A Legacy of Hate Crime in the Current Time – February 19; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Jana’s Jewelry – February 21; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Times Talk: Evangelicals Unwavering Support for President Trump – February 25; 12:00pm to 1:00pm Research Speed Networking Event – February 26; 12:45pm to 3:00pm MDC Workshop – CliftonStrengths Engaged – February 27; 9:00am to 4:00pm Consent Rocks – February 27; 7:00pm to 8:00pm Thank a Woman Table – February 28; 11:00am to 1:00pm MDC Workshop – Closing the Generation Gap – March 3; 8:30am to 12:00pm SHARE WITH STUDENTS Men’s Glee Club and Women’s Chorale Department of Leadership Studies Spring Speaker Series Department of Leadership Studies VALUE Program Encore Series Volunteers Needed! Noyce Summer Scholar Program Interviewing 101 Workshop Adams, Brown, Beran, & Ball Interview FHSU Scholarship Application Deadline – 02/15/2020 Paid Internships for FHSU Student

  • Tiger Daily: February 5, 2020
    FHSU Scholars Repository, 2020
    Co-Authors: Fort Hays State University
    Abstract:

    ANNOUNCEMENTS Upgrade of Polycom Phones Smoky Hill Chorale – Spring 2020 Be the Match Volunteers Calendar: Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities University Photo Open Studio Dates Faculty Applications for Summer Grants for Research, Creative, or Grants Activity Now Being Accepted Academic Advising Training, Certificates, and Webinars Chartwells Introducing Two New Concepts! Tiger Wellness Center Hours Ceramica Clay Club Hosting Visiting Artist Ariel Bowman Interested in Crowdfunding? VIP Ambassador Program Seeking Candidates for 2020-21 Professional Development: Small Teaching Book Talk Annual Steam Shut Down Notice Faculty/Staff Pickleball Join Us for a Mysterious Valentine’s Date FHSU 2nd Annual SoupFest Cook-Off Applications Now Open for the $500 Lynn Haggard Undergraduate Library Research Award Gallery Exhibition: Dredge the Foundry; for Dirt and Era Cost of Poverty Experience (COPE) Electronic Resource Feature: Academic Complete Tigers In Service Seeking Faculty/Staff Advisor for Alternative Spring Break to Grand Canyon Employment Opportunity – Full-Time Custodian, Academic Buildings Join Us for a Mysterious Valentine’s Date FHSU 2nd Annual SoupFest Cook-Off EVENTS THIS WEEK/WEEKEND Times Talk: Violence Erupting in Latin America – TODAY; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Hispanic Dance Session: Polynesian Dance (Hula) – TODAY; 6:30pm to 9:30pm Heart Disease Fundraiser Table – February 7; 11:00am to 1:00pm “Hope in the Heartland” – February 8; 10:00am to 2:00pm Free Community Meal – February 9; 5:30pm to 7:00pm FUTURE EVENTS Red Hand Day – February 11; 11:00am to 1:00pm Times Talk: Vaping Injury Outbreak – February 12; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Valentines for Seniors – February 13; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Health & Wellness Career Fair – February 14; 9:30am to 11:30am Healthy Relationship Table – February 14; 11:00am to 1:00pm St. Joseph Food Pantry – February 15; 8:30am to 12:00pm Hays Symphony FREE Valentine’s Concert – February 15; 7:30pm Presidents’ Day Table – February 17; 11:30am to 1:30pm TILTed Tech Mini-Conference: Assessment – February 18; 12:00pm to 3:00pm Times Talk: A Legacy of Hate Crime in the Current Time – February 19; 12:30pm to 1:30pm Jana’s Jewelry – February 21; 5:30pm to 6:30pm Times Talk: Evangelicals Unwavering Support for President Trump – February 25; 12:00pm to 1:00pm Research Speed Networking Event – February 26; 12:45pm to 3:00pm MDC Workshop – CliftonStrengths Engaged – February 27; 9:00am to 4:00pm Consent Rocks – February 27; 7:00pm to 8:00pm Thank a Woman Table – February 28; 11:00am to 1:00pm MDC Workshop – Closing the Generation Gap – March 3; 8:30am to 12:00pm SHARE WITH STUDENTS Men’s Glee Club and Women’s Chorale Department of Leadership Studies Spring Speaker Series Department of Leadership Studies VALUE Program Encore Series Volunteers Needed!Noyce Summer Scholar Program Interviewing 101 Workshop Adams, Brown, Beran, & Ball Interview

Western Carolina University – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Reporter, June 2008
    Hunter Library Digital Collections Western Carolina University Cullowhee NC 28723;, 2018
    Co-Authors: Western Carolina University
    Abstract:

    The Reporter is a publication produced by Western Carolina University featuring news, events, and campus community updates for faculty and staff. The publication began in August of 1970 and continues digitally today. Click on the link in the “Related Materials” field to access recent issues.New Degrees, Buildings, Policy Changes Part ofWCU’s Response to UNCTomorrow Adding a bachelor of science in engineering, a master’s in environmental science and a doctor of physical therapy to degrees offered at WCU are among the ways Western plans to respond to the most pressing needs of North Carolinians, as identified in the University of North Carolina Tomorrow report. Other proposals in WCU’s most recent response to the UNC Tomorrow effort include establishing a branch campus in Henderson County, constructing a College of Education and Allied Professions building and developing the “health neighborhood” component of the Millennia! Initiative. The health neighborhood would be a cluster of health-related Academic Buildings, research facilities, private businesses and industries, and housing. Many of these proposals may sound familiar, and that’s good news for WCU: That means the plans for the furure that Western’s leaders have been crafting for years position the university to respond to the needs prioritized in the recently released UNC Tomorrow report – needs such as improving public education and aiding economic transformation. The UNC Tomorrow report is guiding the system’s plans and resource allocations, and each UNC institution had to submit a response to the UNC Tomorrow Bardo said initiatives chosen for inclusion in the report can be supported by resources reallocated or obtained for them within the next five years and will produce verifiable or measurable results. They also fir with the university’s integrative, intentional learning modemodel set out in the university’s Quality Enhancement Plan, and with WCU’s commitment to serving the region as a steward of place – a commitment that guided recent changes to WCU’s tenure, promotion and reappointment policies. For each major report finding, WCU’s response includes “flag” statements- “bold declarations of where the institution can best serve the interests of North Carolina; that is, where we plan to ‘plant our flag.”‘ They are statements such as “WCU will expand irs role as the major provider of allied health and nursing education,” and “Through its partnerships with the region’s schools and irs applied research, WCU will influence public policy and practice with regard to reacher preparation and retention, administrative quality and school performance.” “Those statements really get at the heart of where we intend to develop our niches,” said Melissa Wargo, director of assessment. Read all of the flag statements and related proposals in WCU’s response, which is posted at www.wcu.edu/6264.asp. After the university receives feedback on the UNC Tomorrow response, work will begin on the second phase response due in December. That report identifYing how each will address irs needs. “At Western, we were most of the way down this road already,” said Bardo during a campus forum in which he shared WCU’s response. UNCTomorrow at WCU response will propose ways to align WCU’s mission, the Academic planning process, faculty rewards system, and faculty recruitment and retention with UNC Tomorrow. Check out on Page 3 a summary of some of the initiatives in WCU’s response. The full report is online at www.wcu.edu/6264.asp Continued on Page 3 WCU Resources Help Western North Carolina Plan for Growth An effort to address growth and development pressures in North Carolina’s mountains is tapping Western faculty for organizational and research talent. In June 2007, government representatives from the state’s seven westernmost counties – Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Jackson, Macon and Swain – and the Qualla Boundary met en masse. “The intent of the meeting was to gauge interest in promoting responsible development in the western region,” said Vickey Wade, director ofWCU’s Local Government Training Program. The LGTP and the Southwestern Commission, a government office that assists the region in a number of ways, including community development, organized the meeting. A high level of interest among local governments eventually sparked the Mountain Landscapes Initiative, a project to create guidelines for growth in the state’s far west. To introduce the concept, organizers planned a series of community forums where residents could learn about the MLI and offer input on growth and development concerns. ii:Reporter- June 2, 2008 Money from the Community Foundation ofWestern North Carolina, the Cherokee Preservation Foundation, Duke Energy and local governments funded the first phase of the MLI. The Lawrence Group, which offers town planning services and has an office in Davidson, facilitated the forums. Intent on providing as much existing information as possible to forum facilitators, Wade began contacting fellow faculty members who worked in relevant fields, including mapping, water resources and public policy. “It’s a shame to have these resources collect dust on a shelf when they can provide primary source information for an initiative like this,” Wade said. Professors Gibbs K.notts and Chris Cooper, of the department of political science and public affairs, contributed regional political and economic information to the process. Findings from the newest version of the WCU Public Policy Institute’s WNC Regional Outlook Report, recently updated by Cooper, Kathleen Brennan, of the department of anthropology and sociology, and lnhyuck “Steve” Ha, an economics professor in the College of Business, provided context on the economy and public opinion. A needs assessment based on interviews and questionnaires that Anthony Hickey, a professor in the department of anthropology and sociology, and his students compiled enlightened Cashiers residents. Joni Bugden-Storie and Ron Davis, professors in the department of geosciences and natural resources, had their students provide planners and residents with GIS-based data and maps that helped them better understand the region’s topography. From those community forums emerged common themes of conservation, the economy and sense of place. An intensive, weeklong, community-led workshop held in May at Western’s A. K. Hinds University Center yielded suggested planning and development guidelines related to mountainside and ridgetop development, water quality, protection of farmland and other natural spaces, affordable housing and economic development. These suggestions were presented to a crowd of about 180 on May 20 in the UC theater. The next phase of the Mountain Landscapes Initiative is the publication of the guidelines- which are purely optional – and their distribution to local elected officials, government planners, real estate agents, developers and people preparing to move to the region. The Southwestern Commission has raised more than $250,000 toward this effort. According to Ben Brown, MLI spokesman, the university will continue to be a “big player” in the initiative, with the department of political science and public affairs, the Institute for Watershed Research and Management and the Institute for the Economy and the Future contributing resources. – By JILL INGRAM UNC Tomorrow at WCU Continued from cover Initiatives identified under “flag” statements in WCU’s response to UNC Tomorrow include: • Expand forensic science. • Expand partnerships with community colleges. • Expand the Academic Success Program, which enables students to begin their college experience early and provide a complete first year experience to students. • Enhance the study of languages and culture through partnerships with other UNC campuses and international partners. • Address the nursing shortage by increasing the number of students seeking master’s degrees in nurse education. • Implement the Sustainability, Tracking and Rating System, or STARS, to monitor progress toward becoming an environmentally conscious campus. • Implement P.A.C.E., opportunities to increase efficiency and effectiveness identified by the President’s Advisory Committee on Efficiency and Effectiveness. • Leverage institutional resources to address critical land use issues, including environmental reclamation, land use planning and sustainable development. • Respond to the Advantage West Vision Plan’s call for development of a “think tank” to analyze regional development needs. • Better integrate Academic programming with regional visual and performing arts and crafts to enhance the livability of the community. • Boost recruitment and retention activities with historically underrepresented populations in higher education, with special emphasis on the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the emerging Hispanic population. • Advocate for UNC systemwide policy changes such as fully funding summer school. • Expand degrees to include a bachelor of science in engineering, master’s in environmental science and a doctor of physical therapy. • Construct a College of Education and Allied Professions Building. • Establish a branch campus in Henderson County. • Develop the “health neighborhood” component of the Millennia! Initiative. • Increase the integration of the Office ofTechnologyTransfer, Center for Rapid Product Realization and the nationally recognized entrepreneurship program to enhance existing business competitiveness and to create new sustainable globally competitive enterprises. Check our the full WCU response at www.wcu.edu/6264.asp. -By TERESA KILLIAN “This is not just UNCTomorrow. This is UNC yesterday, today, tomorrow and forever:’ -Chancellor John W. Bardo iii Reporter – June 2, 2001 Staff Forum Elects New Members Twelve new representatives recendy were elected ro Staff Forum ro rwo-year terms rhar begin in July. Newly elected members are: Anne Aldrich, assistant ro rhe provost; Wiley Danner, water treatment specialist in the plumbing shop; Virginia Fowler, assistant direcror of facilities in residential living; Brenda Holcombe, financial aid counselor; Jeff Hughes, director of A.K. Hinds University Center; Kim Jamison, office assistant in athletics; Thomas C. Johnson, chief of university police; Joe McFalls, housekeeping supervisor in residential living; Kenny Pauley, spores turf manager in athletics; Carrie Shuler, housekeeping supervisor in residential living; Donna Welch, executive assistant in student affairs; and Debbie J. West, assistant ro the direcror of residential living. For more information, check out http:/ /staffforum.wcu.edu/. Search Extended for Dean of Education, Allied Professions Retirement will wait for Michael Dougherty, dean of the College of Education and Allied Professions, who has agreed ro continue serving as dean through the end of the fall semester as the search continues for his replacement. Dale Carpenter, associate dean of the college, also will remain in his current position. Meanwhile, WCU has contracted with Maya Kirkhope, a senior consultant with Academic Search, to lead the next phase of the search for the new dean. The search firm has placed several deans of education, including the dean at the University of Georgia. Kirkhope will visit WCU in June. Advertising is expected ro begin this summer with candidate interviews in early fall. Provost Kyle Carter said the goal is for the new dean ro begin as soon as possible after Jan. 1. Wendy Ford, dean of the College of Arcs and Sciences, will continue to chair the search committee. Check for updates at www.wcu.edu/334.asp. ~ Reporter- June 2, 2008 Campus Museums Open Furniture Exhibits As the Mountain Heritage Center welcomed visitors to “The Artistry of Plain-Style Furniture” exhibit, the Fine Art Museum prepared to open a complementary exhibit tided “Contemporary Furniture: Innovation in Wood from Appalachian Traditions.” The plain-style furniture exhibit, available through Dec. 15, celebrates furniture handmade in Western North Carolina during the 1800s and early 1900s. The contemporary furniture exhibit, which runs from Tuesday, June 3, to Saturday, June 28, features fine furniture created by three regional artists. The exhibit openings coincided with a symposium co-hosted by the Mountain Heritage Center and the Cashiers Historical Society and made possible through the collaboration of the Mountain Heritage Center, Fine Art Museum, Zachary-Tolbert House in Cashiers and The Bascom in Highlands. “Plain-style furniture personifies the values of a 19th-century farming community more interested in function than finery,” said Scott Philyaw, museum director. Steve Lott, head coach of the women’s golf team, served as a guest curator and, working with a group of generous collecrors, gathered a significant number of furniture pieces never displayed publicly. Among the items are several “Highway 1 0” painred cupboards, whose maker remains unidentified, bur is a popular ropic of discussion among serious antique collectors; a collection of children’s furniture; African-American-made furniture; and pieces created by Jesse Bryson Stalcup, a Macon County master carpenter and Baptist preacher. Next door at the Fine Art Museum, the contemporary furniture exhibit will feature work by Jerome Clark of Sylva, John Gernandt of Waynesville and David Scott of Clyde. Clark’s furniture reinrerprers tradi tiona! Shaker and arts and crafts styles from a contemporary perspective. Gernandt, whose grandfather and great-grandfather built furniture, said his style is ro ask what he can bring forward from rhe past into 21st century pieces of furniture. Scott builds standard and custom contemporary furniture with hardwoods from the region and around the world. “We are excited to feature three of Western North Carolina’s finest contemporary designers and craftsmen,” said Martin DeWitt, museum director. “This region is blessed with fine furniture craftsmanship rooted in tradition.” New Social Work Department Head Driven by Desire to Help John Q Hodges, the new head ofWCU’s social work department, used to worry about the clients he served at a Salt Lake City program for homeless people who had severe mental illnesses. In one case, teens attacked the “kindest, sweetest man you would ever want ro meet,” as the man pushed a shopping cart downtown, said Hodges. “He was in the hospital with severe injuries for weeks,” he said. His clients were vulnerable and sometimes hard to reach, but Hodges witnessed breakthroughs. “In many cases, it took a year or so of just chatting with someone over free coffee in our day room before they would begin to trust us enough to open up and let us connect them with services,” said Hodges. The experience led him to see social work as a kind of hands-on helping profession that enabled him to make a difference to extremely vulnerable people with many needs. So, after earning his bachelor’s degree in psychology in 1992 from the Universiry of Utah, Hodges went back to pursue his master’s degree in social work and then on to the University of California at Berkeley to earn his doctorate in social welfare in 200 I . He comes to WCU on June 15 from the University of Missouri, where he was an award-winning associate professor of social work. “His teaching and scholarly work in the area of mental health treatment and policies, his energy and enthusiasm, and his strong interpersonal skills will be a welcome addition to our new graduate and ongoing undergraduate programs,” said Marie Huff, who is leaving the social work department head position to become full-time associate dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences at WCU. Much of Hodges’ research has explored the added value of consumer-run mental health services such as support groups, and mental health courts, which help divert mentally ill diems from prison to treatment in the communiry. “It’s both more humane and much cheaper than processing someone through the traditional court system and incarcerating them,” said Hodges. “Recidivism rates for offenders who go through mental health court are much lower than those with similar offenses and mental health disorders who go through the traditional system.” He also said studying the needs of first-generation college students is an issue that is close to his heart, as he was in the first generation in his family to earn a college degree. “While first-generation college students might need some additional socialization and help in acculturating to college life, they bring with them many strengths, including hard work, strong family support and an emphasis on the value of a college education,” said Hodges. “I look forward to working with other first-generation students at WCU as well as conducting more research on this topic.” -By TERESA KILLIAN Professors Contribute To ‘Encyclopedia of Appalachia’ What is a moonlight school? How are heirloom vegetables grown? How can a family graveyard have artistic value? WCU professors answer these questions and more as contributors to the recently published “Encyclopedia of Appalachia.” “The encyclopedia is a herculean endeavor to peel back the layers of misinformation on Appalachia and deepen the scholarship on the mountainous states that extend from northern Alabama to New York,” said Jeff Biggers, author of “The United States of Appalachia.” The I ,832-page encyclopedia consists of 34 topic sections, each edited by recognized experts in the field. Jean Haskell and the late Rudy Abramson, co-editors, began deciding topics and authors in 1995, eventually choosing, along with dozens of others, WCU professors Anna Fariello, leader of Hunter Library’s Craft Revival Project, Mary Jean Herzog of the department of educational leadership and foundations, and Curris Wood of the department of history. Others from WCU who contributed writing or editing to the volume include: Tyler Blethen and Richard Starnes from the history department; William L. Anderson, John L. Bell and Max R. Williams, retired history professors; Harold Herzog from the psychology department; Michele Glover and Suzanne H . McDowell from the Mountain Heritage Center; Sharon L. Jacques from the nursing department; James Manning from the communication, and stage and screen departments; Kevin Pennington from educational leadership and foundations department; Nancy Carol Joyner and Karl Nichols, retired English professors; Robert B. Pittman, a retired education professor; Karl Rohr, a former history instructor; Newton Smith, an English professor; and Jane L. Brown, an anthropology instructor. The encyclopedia, which covers such diverse topics as land, food, religion, art and government, was started by the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services at the East Tennessee State University and was published by the Universiry ofTennessee Press. The Center for Appalachian Studies and Services and the Appalachian Regional Commission raised money to try to place one copy in every middle school and high school in distressed and at-risk counties. Approximately I ,000 books have been distributed so far through the Books-InSchools program. “The encyclopedia is an outstanding contribution to our knowledge about Appalachia,” Blethen said. “Before it, there was no one place where we could go to find reliable answers to all kinds of questions about the region.” :i: Reporter – June 2, 2008 Newsfile Carol Burton, assistant vice chancellor for undergraduate studies; Melissa Canady Wargo, director of assessment; and Scott Philyaw, associate professor of history and director of the Mountain Heritage Center, presented a session titled “Small Changes, Big Rewards: Integrating the Disparate Threads of Undergraduate Education” this spring at an Association of American Colleges and Universities’ Conference in Austin, Texas. Philyaw and Burton also recently provided a keynote address titled “Integration with Intentionality: Small Changes, Big Rewards” at lenoir-Rhyne College’s spring faculty meeting in Hickory. Joni Bugden-Storie, assistant professor of natural resource conservation and management, co-authored a poster titled “Mapping Existing River Cane Sites Within Jackson County, North Carolina, Using Visible Aerial Photography; which recently was presented by WCU senior and co-author Carey Burda at the Association of American Geographer’s Meeting in Boston. The research was initiated by a grant provided by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians through the Revitalization ofTraditional Cherokee Artisan Resources. Sugden- Storie also was co-author of a second AAG conference presentation titled “Mapping of Non-tidal Wetlands Using ALOS Palsar Polarimetric Radar Data in Carteret County, North Carolina.” Provost Kyle R. Carter was inducted as the first honorary member of the Mu Epsilon chapter of Alpha Sigma lambda national honor society during the annual ceremony at A.K. Hinds University Center. Alpha Sigma lambda recognizes Academic excellence for nontraditional students. Carter was selected for his commitment to Academic excellence and his efforts in addressing student needs, said Pat Brown, national president of Alpha Sigma lambda and dean of educational outreach. Bethany Davidson, visiting assistant professor of entrepreneurship, recently served as a guest adviser for ideablob.com, an online community where small business owners and entrepreneurs share business ideas in exchange for feedback and advice from the community. ~ Reporter- June 2, 2008 State Funds WCU Energy Efficiency Projects WCU has received $125,000 as one of the recipients of the state’s first Energy Efficiency Reserve Fund grants designed to help state agencies, University of North Carolina system campuses and N.C. community colleges implement power-saving projects. Western’s energy management office in

  • The Reporter, November 1997
    Hunter Library Digital Collections Western Carolina University Cullowhee NC 28723;, 2018
    Co-Authors: Western Carolina University, Western Carolina University
    Abstract:

    The Reporter is a publication produced by Western Carolina University featuring news, events, and campus community updates for faculty and staff. The publication began in August of 1970 and continues digitally today. Click on the link in the “Related Materials” field to access recent issues.The Reporter News from the Faculty and Staff of Western Carolina University November 3,1997 Cullowhee, North Carolina Alumni Association Presents Three Top Awards To Young Physician, Women’s Athletics Official, Campus Minister Two Western Carolina University alumnae and a veteran campus minister received the top Alumni Associa­tion awards at the Chancellor’s Champagne Brunch and Alumni Awards Ceremony October 18. Irene Mace Hamrick, a member of the faculty at East Carolina University School of Medicine, received the first Young Alumni Award; Nora Lynn Finch, associate director of athletics at N.C. State University, received the Professional Achievement Award; and the Rev. George Weekley, United Methodist campus minister, received the Distinguished Service Award. Kenny Messer, president of the Alumni Association, presented the alumni awards, and Chancel­lor John Bardo presented the award for distinguished service. Dr. Hamrick, a native of Germany, came to the United States in 1984 as the wife of an American soldier. A few years later, separated from her husband and trying to support two children on a minimum-wage salary, she realized she had to go back to school. Putting aside a lifelong dream of becoming a physician, she enrolled in the nursing program at Western. With the encouragement of Dr. Frederick Harrison, one of her biology professors, she included pre-med courses in her nursing curricu­lum. After graduating summa cum laude in 1991, she enrolled in medical school at East Carolina, finishing at the top of her class and completing her residency in three years through a special accelerated program. Hamrick recieved her medical degree this summer, and was offered a faculty position in the department of geriatrics at ECU’S School of Medicine. Finch proved herself in a variety of sports while a student at Western in the late 1960s and early 1970s, achieving distinction for her classroom work and her contributions to the community. She earned her bachelor’s degree in education in 1970 and her master’s degree in education in 1971. After graduation, Finch Dr. Irene Mace Hamrick, left, received the 1997 Young Alumni Award, and Nora Lynn Finch, right, received the Professional Achievement Award at the annual Chanc ellor’s Champagne Brunch and Alumni Awards Ceremony October 18. Kenny Messer, center, president of the WCU Alumni Association, presented the awards. coached women’s field hockey, volleyball, basketball, and tennis at Wake Forest University, and was head women’s basketball coach and athletics director at Peace College. Joining N.C. State’s athletics department in 1977, she has served as head women’s softball and volleyball coach, associate women’s basketball coach, coordinator of women’s athletics, and assistant director of athletics. She was named associate director of athletics in 1986. Weekley has served as campus minister for the United Methodist Church since 1966, except for a year-long term as director of campus ministry of the General Board of Higher Education for the United Methodist Church in Nashville, Chancellor John Bardo presented the 1997 Distinguished Service Award to the Rev. George Weekley, left, at the annual Alumni Awards Ceremony on October 18. Tennessee. A graduate of the University of Alabama, he received his master of divinity degree from Duke University. Weekley also is a recipient of the Francis Asbury Award in recognition of his years of service to higher education and campus ministry. Brian Railsback mounts up in preparation for a 110-mile bike ride to Mount Mitchell to raise funds for Honors College scholarships. 110-Mile Bike Ride to Raise Honors Scholarship Funds Brian Railsback, acting dean of the new Honors College, hopes to give the program’s scholarship fund a boost with a 110-mile bike ride from Cullowhee to the top of Mount Mitchell. Railsback was scheduled to leave Cullowhee early Saturday and was to reach the 6,684-foot peak by Monday afternoon, November 3. Except for the stretch from Cullowhee to Balsam Gap, the route follows the Blue Ridge Parkway. MAs a new college with a small alumni base, we had to be innova­tive as we searched for ways to raise scholarship money,” Railsback said. “Mountain biking is a great sport in this area, so it seemed the way to go.” If the fund-raising effort is successful, Railsback envisions a team of Honors College students making the pledge ride to Mount Mitchell next year. “Some students offered to go this first time,” he said, “but I wanted to check the safety of the route first. I hope this becomes a tradition that they’ll take over.” Students solicited pledges in the weeks before the ride and are providing support along the route. The Honors Board of Directors, the student leadership of the organization, hopes to begin awarding scholarship as early as next spring semester. “We hope the pledge ride will become an annual event,” said Michelle Gurley, a senior who chairs the student board. “It will bring together honors students, alumni, and other members of the WCU community.” Last summer, the Honors Program was elevated to college status. Honors students are invited to live in Reynolds Hall, which offers special facilities and programs for the students. Students also take honors courses at the general education level, with seminars and independent study within their majors. Approximately 245 students are enrolled in the program. Anyone interested in making a pledge may call 227-7383. In the event of rain, the ride will be postponed to November 7-9. \J WCU NOTES • Elsie Beaver (Office for Rural Education) has been elected to the National Officer Council with Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity. Beaver assumed duties as province officer at the conclusion of the SAI National Conference held in Denver, Colorado, in July. She will over-see the SAI college and alumnae chapter activities in North and South Carolina. Beaver was a central figure in the establishment of the SAI Eta Theta Chapter at WCU and served as an adviser for the local chapter until this summer. • Bill Clauss (Office for Rural Education), and Don Chalker and Robbie Pitman (Depart­ment of Administration, Curr­iculum, and Instruction) were presenters at the National Rural Education Association conference in Tucson, Arizona, on Septem­ber 25. The presentation, “A Symposium on Rural School Leadership,” was based on a new book, Educational Leadership in Rural Schools, a collaboration of 20 authors. The WCU presenters, also contributors to the book, were joined by four other authors from the University of Nebraska and Valdosta State University. Edited by Don Chalker and published by Technomic Publishers of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the book will be available in February. • J. Casey Hurley, associate professor of education administra­tion, has been named acting associate dean of the Graduate School, filling a vacancy created by the appointment of Associate Dean Stephen P. Yurkovich to acting dean of the Graduate School. Hurley earned his bachelor’s degree in English education from St. Norbert College and his master’s degree and doctorate in educational administration from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before coming to WCU in 1989, he worked in the public school system in Wisconsin. • Dr. Susan Brown (Health and Human Performance) has been appointed to a three-year term on the Sport Management Program Review Council. The council, which approves sport management curriculum nationwide at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral level, is a joint effort of the North American Society for Sport Management and the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. • Dr. Kathy Ivey (Mathematics and Computer Science) gave a presentation titled “Warning: Asking Questions May Lower Your Mathematical Status in Small Groups” at the 19th annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Study Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, held October 18-21 in Bloomingtom- Normal, Illinois. ••••••••••••••• -State- IED’ CAMPAIGN ••••••••••••••• Combined Campaign Now Underway; Deadline Is November 14 The deadline for “Partners in Giving, a combined fund-drive for university employees, is November 14. Permanent employees may contribute by payroll deduction, and all employees may contribute by check or cash. Because of money collection changes, direct billing is not an option this year. For payroll deduction, forms must have Social Security number, signature, and amount of gift (divisible by 12). Solicitors are urged to have pledge forms and contributions to Carla Cosio, 130 Reid, by November 20. A fund-drive thermometer in front of the Robinson Administration Building shows how the university is progressing with pledges. Last year, W CU employees contributed more than $29,000 to the combined campaign. November 3,1997 • The Reporter Library Hours Hunter Library operating on extended hours schedule. Through Monday, November 24. (227-7306) Massage Sessions Massage sessions are offered every Wednesday through December 17. Massage therapist eases tension from your shoulders and upper back. Appointments run every 20 minutes, and a session lasts 15 minutes. Cost is $10 per session. 3-4:40 p.m., Room 131, Reid Gym. (Wellness Program, 227-7018) Monday, November 3 Concert, Smoky Mountain Brass Quintet. Free, 8 p.m. RH. (227-7242) Academic advising for spring semester and early registration in Cullowhee. Through Friday, November 7, by appointment. (227-7216) Tuesday, November 4 Concert, University Chorus and Show Choir. Free. 8 p.m., RH. (227-7242) Ticket sales begin, Madrigal Christmas Dinner. $20 WCU students, $25 general public. 9 a.m.-12 p.m., 1-4 p.m., weekdays. Second floor, UC. (227-7206) Wednesday, November 5 Art exhibit opening reception, “Conversations With Dirck” by Dusty Benedict. 7 p.m. Chelsea Gallery, UC. (227-7206) Performance, Michel Tirabosco and Antonio Dominguez, a pan flute and guitar duo. Sponsored by International Programs and Services and the Music Depart­ment. Free. 8 p.m., RH. (227-7494) Thursday, November 6 Concert, WCU Wind Ensemble. Free. 8 p.m., RH. (227-7242) Performance, Up All Night Coffeehouse Series presents Beth Wood. Sponsored by LMP. $1 WCU students, $3 all others. 9 p.m., UC Grandroom. (227-7206) Friday, November 7 Volleyball, women’s. WCU vs. UNC-Greensboro. Southern Conference match. 7 p.m., Reid Gym. (227-7338) Saturday, November 8 Presentation, “Mountain Tourism: A look at the 1800s,” with Jane Nardy, genealogical researcher, teacher, and lecturer. In-depth look at 1800s era resorts of the area. Ends with Mountain Heritage Center tour. $25.9 a.m.-noon, 102 Coulter Building. (227-7397) W.O.W. (Women on Weights) class. Limited to 12 people. $10.9 a.m.- noon, Fitness Center. (227-7069) Hobday Tree Skirt and Stocking Making, Laura Nelle Goebel. $19. Also, meets Saturday, Nov. 15. 12-5 p.m., 127 Kilban. (227-7397) Sunday, November 9 Vobeybab, women’s. WCU vs. Davidson. Southern Conference match. 2 p.m., Reid Gym. (227-7338) Reading, Yusef Komunyakaa, poet. An LCE event. $5 adults, $3 children /non-WCU students, free to WCU students. 3 p.m., Cherokee Room, UC. (227-7722) Tuesday, November 11 Vobeybab, women’s. WCU vs. Tennessee. 7 p.m., Reid Gym. (227- 7338) Meeting, Western Carolina Civb War Roundtable presents “Southern­ers and Mountaineers: The Civil War and Community in Haywood County.” Featuring Richard D. Starnes. Sponsored by WCU Depart­ment of History. Open to the public. 7p.m., Cubowhee United Methodist Church febowship hab. (227-7243) Poetry reading, by Keith Flynn, rock *n roll poet, lyricist and lead singer for the Asheville-based rock band Crystal Zoo. Part of the Visiting Writers Series at WCU and sponsor­ed in part by NC Arts Council. Free. 7:30 p.m., Hospitahty Room, RAC. (227-7722) Wednesday, November 12 Assertiveness Training Workshop. Free. 3-5 p.m., Cardinal Room, UC. (227-7469) Herbal gift class, Becky Lipkin. Useful information for herbal gifts, plus recipes, sample herbs. Harvest and preserve fresh mountain herbs. $29.6-8 p.m., 118 Forsyth Building. (227-7397) Women’s basketball. Smoky Mountain Swarm Exhibition. 7:30 p.m. RAC. (227-7338) Thursday, November 13 Quilting class, Star Quest: traditional quilting pattern, Laura Nelle Goebel. $39. Thursdays, through December 18.6-9 p.m., 127 Kihian Budding. (227-7397) Program, “Re-Creation of the Wilderness: Taking the Land…For Tourism and Recreation,” with Margaret Brown of Brevard Cobege. Free. 7 p.m., Founders Auditorium, MHC. (227-7129) Concert, Western Carolina University Percussion Ensemble. Free. 8 p.m., RH. (227-7242) Friday, November 14 “Cafeteria” Faculty Evaluation Forms (student evaluations of fa culty). Blank evaluation forms wib be returned to departments for distribution. (Noebe Kehrberg, 227-7239) Intermediate Dulcimer, with Anne Lough. Develop left and right hand technique, finger-picking, chording, additional tunings, and repertoire. Basic playing techniques a prerequi­site. $49.5-9 p.m. and Saturday, November 15,9 a.m.-4 p.m., 307 Moore Hab. (227-7397) Sunday, November 16 Concert, Western Carolina University Community Chorus and Community Orchestra perform Handel’s “Messiah.” $6 adults, $3 students. 4 p.m., RH. (227-7242) Submissions: Send news items and calendar notices to 1601 Ramsey Center. Items for the electronic bulletin board on campus (cable channel 39) and for the university’s calendar on the World-Wide Web (http:I / www.wcu.edu / cal.html) should reach 1601 Ramsey Center at least a week before the event in question. Now showing Exhibitions: “Conversations With Dirck,” by Dusty Benedict. A series of drawings based on the artist’s discussions of art and life with his now deceased friend. Chelsea Gallery, Hinds University Center, through December 12. (Beth Johnson, 227-7206) “Migration of the Scotch-Irish People” and “Going Places” (a historical look at travel in Western North Carolina). MHC, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. (227-7129) Graduate Student Exhibition, November 5-Decem-ber 3. Belk Building Gallery, 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. weekdays or by appointment. (227-7210) Key: HFR – H.F. Robinson Administration Building; HS/CF-Hennon Stadium/Childress Field; NSA – Natural Sciences Auditorium; RAC – Ramsey Regional Activity Center, RH – Recital Hab, Coulter Building; UC – Hinds University Center. The Reporter • November 3,1997 • wcu mm • Madrigal Christmas Dinner tickets go on sale at 9 a.m. Tuesday, November 4, on the second floor of the Hinds Univer­sity Center. The annual extrava­ganzas, a tradition since 1970, are scheduled for Friday and Saturday, December 5 and 6, in the Grandroom of Hinds Univer­sity Center. Menu for this year’s feast features prime rib, old-world potatoes, grilled zucchini, yellow squash and red onions, Yorkshire pudding, salad, rolls, and plum pudding with hard sauce. Programs begin at 6:30 p.m., and everyone must be seated by 6:25 p.m. Tickets are $20 for students, $25 for all others. Telephone reservations may be paid by MasterCard or Visa. To order, call 227-7206. • A pan flute and guitar concert, performed by Michel Tirabosco and Antonio Dominguez, will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, November 5, in the Coulter Building recital hall. Tirabosco, a native of Rome who now lives in Geneva, Switzerland, has performed as pan flute soloist in Europe, South America, and the United States. He has performed in numerous concerts and music festivals and has contributed to various Swiss radio broadcasts. Dominguez, a native of Spain who also lives in Geneva, has received numerous awards for his guitar work. He has performed as a soloist in Switzerland, Germany, Yugoslavia, the United States, and England. He performs and records with the group Kordepan and with Tirabosco. The free concert is sponsored by the International Programs and Services, Music Department, College of Arts and Sciences, and Academic Affairs. For additional information, call 227-7494. • Rock musician and poet Keith Flynn will read from his works at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 11, in the Hospitality Room of the Ramsey Regional Activity Center. Funded by the North Carolina Arts Council, the reading is part of the Visiting Writers Series. Flynn, lyricist and lead singer for the Asheville-based rock band Crystal Zoo, is a recipient of the Sandburg Prize for poetry and has published two collections of poetry, The Talking Drum (1991) and The Book of Monsters (1994). He is founder and managing editor of The Asheville Poetry Review. The reading is free. For information, caU 227-7264. • The Western North Carolina Civil War Roundtable will hold its second meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, November 11, in the Cullowhee United Methodist Church fellowship hall. The roundtable, sponsored by the Department of History, is a series of public programs and discussion sessions for people interested in the Civil War. The November session features Richard D. Starnes, who will present “Southerners and Mountaineers: The Civil War and Community in Haywood County.” The roundtable will not meet again until January 13. For information, call 227-7243. • “The Bill of Assertive Rights,” a two-hour assertiveness training workshop led by Dr. Chris Gunn, is scheduled 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, November 12, in the Cardinal Room of Hin ds University Center. The workshop will help partici­pants define the differences between assertion and aggression and show how to develop valuable assertiveness skills. Spo nsored by Counseling and Psychological Services, the workshop is free. For additional information, call 227-7469. • Get fit for the holidays at half price. For the remainder of the semester, the Fitness Center is offering land and water aerobics for half price: $7 per person. Sessions will be offered Monday through Friday in Reid Gymnasium. For more information, call the Fitness Center at 227-7069 or drop in. • Four WCU staff members and 19 students participated in the Million Woman March in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 25. Staff members attending were Brian Bridges (Student Development) Tammi Brown (Retention Services), A1 Degraffenreid (Housing), and Ceasar Hu nt (Admissions). The Reporter is published by the Office of Public Information. Mail notices and changes of address to the Reporter, 1601 Ramsey Center, or send them via e-mail to REPORTER. 1,600 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $229.15, or $0.14 per copy. Western Carolina University is an Equal Opportunity Institution. The Reporter Office of Public Information Publications Unit 1601 Ramsey Center Cullowhee, North Carolina 28723 NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID CULLOWHEE, N.C. PERMIT NO. 1 November 3,1997 • The Reporter The Reporter News from the Faculty and Staff of Western Carolina University November 18,1997 Cullowhee, North Carolina WCU Trustees Approve Computer Requirement for Incoming Freshmen The Western Carolina University board of trustees made history November 5, unanimously approving a resolution to require that all incoming freshmen come to campus next August equipped with networkable computers. The action means that Western is the first campus in the University of North Carolina system to adopt such a requirement as a condition of admission, and one of only a handful of universities — public or private — in the nation. Trustees agreed that Western’s existing infrastructure made it possible to lead the way in computer applications on the campus and in the curriculum. While many experts predict that students at other campuses will have similar requirements in the near future, Western is able to take that step now, thanks to the completion of fiber-optic cabling of the campus, followed by the connection of all the Academic Buildings and residence hall rooms. Western has two fiber­optic cable rings encircling the campus and more than 5,500 Internet connections, including two Internet connections in every residence hall room. “Western Carolina Univer­sity is in a position to provide a high quality education that speaks to the needs of the student in the 21st century,” board chairman Jim L. Moore of Sylva said. “The computer has become a basic tool in this information-rich world, and Western has estab­lished itself as a leader in applying information and communication technology to learning. This action ensures that Western students will have maximum opportunities in preparation for the future.” Having 24-hour access to a computer that is linked to the faculty — and to the world — is a powerful, necessary tool, Chancellor John Bardo said. “What we’re trying to do is ensure that every graduate of Western has the basic skills necessary to be competitive in an economy that relies increasingly on information management,” said Bardo. “This vote under­scores the significance Western Carolina University places on providing a world-class education to the people of North Carolina.” The move caps a semester of campuswide study and discussion about the pros and cons of a computer requirement. Chancel­lor Bardo first raised the issue at the annual fall faculty meeting in August, and said that he planned to ask the board of trustees to study the issue. On September 10, Chairman Moore appointed a special committee — composed of the Academic affairs and personnel committee and the student and athletic affairs committee — to meet and study the proposal, and to return to the full board with a recommendation in November. The Student Government Association gave its backing to the proposal on Octo­ber 1, approving by a 19-3 vote, with two abstention

  • The Reporter, November 2008
    Hunter Library Digital Collections Western Carolina University Cullowhee NC 28723;, 2018
    Co-Authors: Western Carolina University
    Abstract:

    The Reporter is a publication produced by Western Carolina University featuring news, events, and campus community updates for faculty and staff. The publication began in August of 1970 and continues digitally today. Click on the link in the “Related Materials” field to access recent issues.UNC Board Tours WCU, Commends Learning Plan Western Carolina’s emphasis on creating an environment of engaged learning for students and on using its intellectual resources co help solve regional problems is in lockstep with University of North Carolina system efforts co respond co challenges facing the state in che 21st centuty. That was che word from UNC officials, who heard a presentation from Chancellor John W. Bardo co the UNC Board of Governors about recent changes at WCU. The board was on campus Wednesday, Oct. 15, through Friday, Oct. 17, for its monthly meeting. The developments described by Bardo include adoption of a Quality Enhancement Plan designed co help students connect Academic and co-curricular experiences in order co better reach their goals after graduation; a new tenure and promotion policy chat rewards faculty members for applying their scholarship, and research activities co the benefic of the region; and creating multiple-use neighborhoods chat will become home co a mix of Academic Buildings, research facilities, business, induscty and housing through the Millennia! Initiative. “Engagement is the process of bringing the resources of the university co che people of the state and che region co help solve problems chat they have identified,” Bardo cold the board. “Through the QEP and our other initiatives, we are developing the intellectual capital for che people of North Carolina, especially the people of Western North Carolina.” During their visit, board members toured the Kimmel School of Construction Management and Technology, heard from students who are working on patent-seeking engineering and technology projects, and learned about how recreational therapy students are getting hands-on experience while providing services for patients of a local Alzheimer’s disease unit. Erskine Bowles, UNC system president, and Hannah Gage, chair of the Board of Governors, said that Western Carolina’s focus on engagement and helping solve statewide problems is in perfect alignment with the goals of UNC Tomorrow, an effort co determine the most pressing needs facing North Carolinians and identifying how UNC institutions can meet chose needs. “This is precisely what we have been talking about for more chan a year with UNC Tomorrow in preparing students for the work oflife,” Gage said. In remarks prior co his report co the board, Bowles agreed. “What an extraordinary visit. Coming co campuses gives us a chance to see che real progress our leaders and chancellors are making. We gee co see students and see results,” he said. “What Western is doing by promoting applied research and engaging students with the community is on the cutting edge of what UNC Tomorrow is all about.” Members of the UNC Board of Governors are elected by the General Assembly and serve four-year terms on the policy-making body charged with supervision, management and governance of all affairs of UNC constituent institutions. The board’s 32 members elect the president of the UNC system. About two of the board’s monthly meetings are held outside Chapel Hill each year. Their visit to Western Carolina was the first since 1999. -By BILL STUOENC See photos from the board’s visit, including the dedication of the Campus Recreation Center, on page 4. Tickets Still Available to Hear Best-selling Author Kathy Reichs Admission is free of charge co hear forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs, rhe best-sdling author whose mystery novels inspired the hit Fox television series “Bones,” speak at WCU on Tuesday, Nov. 18, but tickets must be reserved in advance. Reichs will take rhe stage at 7:30p.m. in the performance hall of the Fine and Performing Arts Center following an informal discussion open only co WCU students. Her visit is part of rhe 2008-09 Chancellor’s Speaker Series, which is designed to bring significant national and international leaders co campus co discuss major issues of the day, and to provide Western students with an opportunity ro interact with some of the people who shape and influence rhe world. Reichs’ debut novel, “Deja Dead,” became a New York Times bestseller and won the 1997 Ellis Award for Best First Novel. Her other fiction works, which chronicle the adventu res of forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan, include “Death du Jour,” “Deadly Decisions,” “Grave Secrets,” “Bare Bones,” “Monday Mourning,” “Cross Bones,” “Break No Bones” and “Bones co Ashes.” Her book “Fatal Voyage” is set in the mountains of Western North Carolina, and her latest thriller, “Devil Bones,” is hot off rhe presses. In addition, Reichs is a frequent consultant co the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in North Carolina and to law enforcement officials in the province of Quebec, Canada. he has traveled co Rwanda co testify at a United Nations tribunal on genocide, helped exhume a mass grave in Guatemala, and aided in the identification of war dead from World War II and conflicts in Korea and Southeast Asia. Reichs is one of only 77 forensic anthropologists certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. Her visit co Western will bring her to a campus where another board-certified forensic anthropologist, John Williams, directs the Academic program in forensic anthropology. Williams and C heryl Johnston, ass istant professor of anthropology and socio logy, operate the Western Carolina Human Identification Laboratory and an outdoor decomposition research facility that is only the second of irs kind in the nation. Tickets, up to four per person, can be picked up at the Fine and Performing Arts Center box office. Call 227-2479 for more information. Business College Claims Spot in Princeton Review Ran kings Western Carolina’s College of Business was featured as one of the nation’s best schools at which to earn a master’s degree in business administration and earned a top-four spot among schools offering the greatest opportunity for women in a book recently published by The Princeton Review. The New York-based education services company features WCU in the 2009 edition of its “Best 296 Business Schools” publication. “We select schools for this book based on our high regard for their Academic programs and offerings, institutional data we collect from the schools, and the candid opinions of students attending them who rate and report on their campus experiences at the schools,” said Robert Franek, vice president of publishing for The Princeton Review. “We are pleased to recommend Western Carolina University to readers of our book and users of our Web site as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn an MBA.” WCU students cold the editors that they especially liked the small size of classes offered by the College of Business, which allows professors to employ a wide range of teaching techniques, including team projects, case studies and in-class discussion in addition to traditional lecture. One respondent told The Princeton Review that administrators and professors are “always available and easy to talk to.” Western’s fourth-place ranking among the schools offering the greatest opportunities for women was based on the percentage of students who are female (51 percent); the percentage of faculry who are female (31 percent); and student assessment of resources for female students, how supportive the culture is of female students, whether the business school offers course work for women entrepreneurs, and whether case study materials for classes proportionately reflect women in business. “We are proud to be included among the best business schools as determined by The Princeton Review,” said Ronald A. Johnson, dean of the College of Business. “Inclusion in this list is the latest indicator of the quality of our Academic programs in business, and it speaks highly of the efforts of our faculty who are striving to produce graduates who are ‘business ready.'” Adrianne Gordon, who completed her MBA at Western Carolina, ‘- :iiReporter- November 3, 2008 Rou,/rl , I. /oln1′”” said the program was challenging and beneficial. “What I appreciated most was that I could immediately apply what I learned in class ar night to the next day’s work with small businesses,” said Gordon, who is a general business and disaster recovery counselor for the Small Business and Technology Development Center in Asheville. The national recognition ofWCU’s MBA program comes a year after the university’s Master of Entrepreneurship Program was . recognized as one of the five best online entrepreneurship programs In the nation by Fortune Small Business magazine. WCU Helps Cherokee Artists Renew River Cane Treaty Arrisrs from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians recently were able to harvest river cane needed for baskets through the revival of a 60-year-old agreement by staffers with the Revitalization ofTraditional Cherokee Artisan Resources. Known at RTCAR (pronounced “Are Tee Car”), the two-person office, located on U.S. 19 near Bryson Ciry, receives funding from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and is operated through WCU’s Cherokee studies program. RTCAR was established in 2004 to help ensure that craft materials are available to Cherokee artists, including basket-makers, potters, wood and stone carvers, weavers and metalworkers, by addressing the dwindling supply of materials such as river cane, clay, dye planes, white oak and carving stone. Typically RTCAR achieves this by identifying and then funding nonprofit organizations connected ro the sustainable natural resources needed ro create traditional Cherokee arr. RTCAR also supporrs projects that promote Cherokee craft through education and exhibitions. In this case, however, David Cozza, project director, and Beth Johnson, communiry development specialist, turned to an existing agreement between the Eastern Band and a Kentucky festival regarding the harvest of river cane. A 1948 “cane treary” created by organizers of the Daniel Boone Festival in Barbourville, Ky., guaranteed Eastern Cherokee access to “cane for as many baskets as they can make.” In the beginning years of the festival, which now includes music, craft demonstrations, competitions and a parade, an Eastern Band delegation regularly attended. After learning of the cane treary, Johnson and Cozza contacted organizers of the annual event to inquire if the offer was still good. The RTCAR staffers, along with former Sequoyah Professor Tom Hatley, joined Bill Frazier, a program director for the Daniel Boone Festival, this spring to scout potentially promising cane stands in the Cumberland River area. River cane is the only genus of bamboo native to the United States and used ro be in plentiful supply along area rivers. Cherokee basket-makers also will work with honeysuckle, maple and red oak, but river cane is the most traditional of basketry materials, and artists crave mature, tall, straight cane with a large diameter and no offshoots. As in Western Norrh Carolina, river cane in the Cumberland River area has diminished over the years. However, said Johnson, “We found some on properry that belonged to the dry, and other stands that were on privately owned farmland.” On Oct. 1, RTCAR led a caravan to Barbourville to harvest at one of the canebrakes. Eastern Band members Berry Maney, Geraldine Walkingstick, Lucille Lossiah, Roscoe Youngdeer and John Ed Walkingstick all parricipated, and Johnson and Cozza cut cane for weavers from Cherokee High School. The group returned with several bundles and is excited at the prospect of future harvests in the area. Maney returned to Barbourville during this year’s festival, Oct. 5-11, to hold basket-weaving demonstrations. Maney and Principal Chief Michell Hicks both parricipated in a ceremonial signing of the cane treary. According to Johnson, RTCAR is in the process of developing agreements with individual landowners for the harvesting of artistic materials. “Kentucky was kind of the starr of that,” she said. “It’s so complicated because every piece of pro perry is different.” To date, RTCAR has distributed $1.2 million in grants, including $180,000 for projects through WCU. Among RTCAR’s most recent round of grants, recipients included non profits engaged in the following projects: the documentation and collection of Cherokee heritage seed varieties; the establishment of protocol for introducing populations of the ramp vegetable on tribal lands; the exploration of traditional Cherokee metalworking; the exhibition of contemporary Cherokee carvers throughout the Southeast; and the education of the next generation of Cherokee basket-weavers. For more information about RTCAR, call 554-6856 or visit www.rrcar.org. -By JILL INGRAM ~Reporter – November 3, 2008 3 UNC Board of Governors Visits Western Carolina The University of North f:arolina Board of Governors held its monthly meeting at Western Carolina University from Oct. 15-17. During their visit, they also attended a reception at the North Carolina Center for the Advancement ofTeaching, watched the Pride of the Mountains Marching Band, toured laboratories of the Kimmel School of Construction Management and Technology and participated in the dedication of the Campus Recreation Center. Pictured, clockwise from top right, are WCU students ascending the climbing wall after unveiling dedication banners; Chancellor John W. Bardo speaking at the ceremony; and Bardo pointing out additional information to Hannah Gage, chair of the UNC board, and Erskine Bowles (right), UNC system president, at the Oct. 17 CRC dedication. Bottom right, Gage and Bowles listen to WCU students from the Kimmel School during Bardo’s presentation to the UNC Board of Governors. Bottom left, Bowles speaks with, from left, Jean Rogers, a retired school psychologist and counselor from Williamston; Alton Ballance, an NCCAT Center Fellow from Ocracoke; and R. Scott Griffin, an NCCAT trustee from Mount Holly, during a reception at NCCAT. Middle left, speakers at WCU’s recreation center dedication were, from left, Bardo; Gage; Michael Frixen, president of the WCU Student Government Association; Joan MacNeill, chair of the WCU board of trustees; and Bowles. 4 ~Reporter- November 3, 2008 INSIDE THE FACUlTY lOUNGE with Jamie Davis Jamie Davis, assistant professor of French and Spanish, has launched initiatives at WCU including the annual Spanish/Latin American Film Festival, the Spanish House living/ learning experience, placement testing, Spanish for the professions and a “living classroom” for foreign languages. In addition, he and Lori Oxford, a Spanish lecturer at WCU, have engaged their students in a program in which the WCU students tutor children at Cul­lowhee Valley School who do not speak English as their first language. Part of their goal is to help WCU students become aware of their roles as world citizens. Davis, a native of Lenoir, earned a bachelor’s degree in French from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1989, a master’s degree in French from Georgia State University in 1994, and a doctorate from the University of Georgia in 2000. The Reporter: Your docrorate is in romance languages and has a focus on literature. What were your favorite books growing up? Davis: “The Wolves of Willoughby Chase” by Joan Aiken, “Harriet the Spy” by Louise Fitzhugh and “The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint Exupety. There are so many. That’s a tough question. I have a great story to tell about reading, though. The Reporter: Tell. Davis: In 1980, I had a reading teacher named Ms. Clarke. She was loud and really, really funny, and I adored her. In spite of my admiration, I failed ro do a book report for her on “Johnny Tremain.” I duly got an ‘F’ that quarter, and I was devastated because I wanted to do well for her. For years, I would go into libraries and bookstores and there that book would be, haunting me. In 1994, I was in a public library in Atlanta and there it was again. I rook it home, read it, loved it … then proceeded to write a 15-page book report on it, which I mailed to Ms. Clarke with a letter about how she transformed my life by broadening my love of literature. About a week later, I went ro a mailbox and there was a letter: “Dear Jamie, I am in receipt of your book report on ‘Johnny Tremain.’ Although it is 14 years late, I have decided nonetheless that I will accept it. Your grade: A+. Your letter came at a time in my life when I was doubting that I had ever made a difference – that my entire career had been a failure. Thank you for letting me know that I did reach some. P.S. I went back to my gradebook from 1980 and noted that you were also supposed to have done a posterboard representing colonial Boston which you failed to do, but I will give you another 14 years ro do that.” It was wonderful. The Reporter: When did you know you wanted to teach? Davis: When I taught a classmate how ro dissect a frog in the seventh grade. I also taught her how to tell time. Before that, people made fun of her. The Reporter: What led ro your interest in languages? Davis: I was fascinated by other cultures, and it was a means to escape into them. The Reporter: What languages do you speak? Davis: French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and some Farsi. My Italian is pretty good. My Portuguese is really bad now. If you don’t use it, you lose it. The Reporter: What led you to start a community Spanish class for law enforcement officers last spring? Davis: When I was in the police academy back in 1995, I saw a video in which a constable from Texas named Darryl Lunsford was killed. It really affected me. The men who killed him discussed in Spanish their plan right before they did it. If he had comprehended the word “pisrola” or any word that would have let him know that an attack was com­ing, the outcome might have been different. I was in com­munication with his widow last year. Her painful articula­tion of this tragedy is what prompted me to start teaching Spanish for law enforcement officers on a small scale. At Western, we have hopes for developing Spanish courses for law enforcement officers, social workers, nurses, emergency medical technicians, nutritionists and dieticians, environmental health care workers and physical therapists. This is really exciting because it is very definitely in line with the QEP (the university’s Qualiry Enhancement Plan) in its encouragement ro reach across curriculum ro make a difference. The Reporter: You also are a musician. Do you see it as another language? Davis: It’s highly emotive and expressive. In my formative years, growing up in a less progressive town I needed to say certain things and didn’t have the vocabulary or the flourish in my language ro be able to do so. I taught myself how to play everything- euphonium, French horn, clarinet …. The only thing I can’t play is oboe and bassoon. There’s a bassoon in the corner of my office that I bought ro try ro learn how to play. It’s a decoration now. I played with the Atlanta Wind Symphony at Carnegie Hall in 2005. I play now for the Western tuba euphonium ensemble. The Reporter: What drives you? Davis: I want everyone in this world to be honored and respected and loved. A larger goal is to eliminate racism, sexism and other prejudices. At the end of the day, am I teaching Spanish? Yes. And am I doing what I think is in ~Reporter – November 3, 2008 5 Series Puts Students in Touch with Broadway Performers If you can’t go to Broadway, bring Broadway to you. Such is the chinking behind the musical cheater program’s initiatives to bring working professionals into the classroom. “They bring to Cullowhee a New York presence and a New York professionalism,” said Bradley Martin, director of the musical theater program. Musical theater – part of the stage and screen department in the College of Fine and Performing Arcs – initiated the Broadway Guest Artist Series this semester with the goal of strengthening the musical theater program and, in turn, the experience of its approximately 40 students. The series’ two components, a guest artist program and a visiting artist program, are a complement to the Carolyn Plemmons Phillips and Ben R. Phillips Distinguished Professorship of Musical Theatre, a title now held by Broadway actor Terrence Mann. Guest artists accept residencies that are spread over week increments throughout the semester and include a series of classes. Charlotte d’Arnboise, a Tony Award­nominated dancer and actress who starred in the revival of “A Chorus Line” on Broadway, is the guest artist for both the fall and spring semesters. Recently, she rehearsed students on a long section of ”A Chorus Line,” part of an upcoming production called “Don’t Tell Mama.” Visiting artists stay for a single duration and hold workshops on their respective specializations, such as acting, dancing, singing or auditioning. The first round of visiting artists include Dave Clemmons, a casting director and voice instructor who was here in September; Christopher d’Amboise, a dancer and choreographer scheduled for November; voice therapist and teacher Joan Lader, also scheduled for November; and, next semester, actress and singer Victoria Clark. A visit by Jason Robert Brown, a young, up-and-coming composer, lyricist, pianist and singer, is tentatively planned. As important as introducing the students to a larger theater world, the new programs introduce the visiting and guest artists to WCU students, a fact not lost on Patrick Detloff, a WCU junior and musical theater major. Detloff has a lead role in “Of Thee I Sing,” the musical theater program’s upcomin

Rehan Sadiq – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Benchmarking of Water, Energy, and Carbon Flows in Academic Buildings: A Fuzzy Clustering Approach
    Sustainability, 2020
    Co-Authors: Abdulaziz G. Alghamdi, Husnain Haider, Kasun Hewage, Rehan Sadiq
    Abstract:

    In Canada, higher educational institutions (HEIs) are responsible for a significant portion of energy consumption and anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Improving the environmental performance of HEIs is an important step to achieve nationwide impact reduction. Academic Buildings are among the largest infrastructure units in HEIs. Therefore, it is crucial to improve the environmental performance of Academic Buildings during their operations. Identifying critical Academic Buildings posing high impacts calls for methodologies that can holistically assess the environmental performance of Buildings with respect to water and energy consumption, and GHG emission. This study proposes a fuzzy clustering approach to classify Academic Buildings in an HEI and benchmark their environmental performance in terms of water, energy, and carbon flows. To account for the fuzzy uncertainties in partitioning, the fuzzy c-means algorithm is employed to classify the Buildings based on water, energy, and carbon flow indicators. The application of the developed methodology is demonstrated by a case study of 71 Academic Buildings in the University of British Columbia, Canada. The assessed Buildings are grouped into three clusters representing different levels of performances with different degrees of membership. The environmental performance of each cluster is then benchmarked. Based on the results, the environmental performances of Academic Buildings are holistically determined, and the building clusters associated with low environmental performances are identified for potential improvements. The subsequent benchmark will allow HEIs to compare the impacts of Academic building operations and set realistic targets for impact reduction.

Daniel F. Espejel-blanco – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Environmental Impacts of Energy Saving Actions in an Academic Building
    Sustainability, 2019
    Co-Authors: José Antonio Hoyo-montaño, Guillermo Valencia-palomo, Rafael Armando Galaz-bustamante, Abel García-barrientos, Daniel F. Espejel-blanco
    Abstract:

    Global warming and climate change effects have been of such impact that several countries around the world are enforcing public policies to mitigate them. Mexico has shown a strong commitment to the environment and rational use of energy, as signed on the General Law for Climate Change (GLCC) and stating, in its second article, the goal of a 30% reduction of greenhouse gases by 2020. To add to this goal, the Hermosillo Institute of Technology is implementing a pilot energy saving program that mixes retrofitting of Academic Buildings and the implementation of automatic controls for lighting and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC). The retrofitting is performed by replacing fluorescent T8 tubes with high efficiency LED T8 tubes in a new arrangement. To increase the energy saving obtained by the retrofitting, a building automation and control system (BACS) has been developed and installed. The BACS is implemented using two different networks, the first one communicates a central control unit with the building control node using a private Ethernet network. Inside the building, the control actions are transmitted using a ZigBee network. The energy savings have been estimated as 4864 kWh/year, representing a 36.42% saving, the environmental and health effects are calculated using emission parameters of the nearest power plant to our site, and the procedure presented in Harvard’s Six Cities Study by Dockery. Results show a total CO2eq equivalent to 0.000409% of the national goal. The economic impacts of the carbon social cost and health benefits are $745.26 USD/year and $4017.71 USD/year while the direct billing savings are $3700.56 USD/year, and these results are based on only one building of the campus.

  • Retrofitting and energy control of an Academic Building
    2016 IEEE Conference on Technologies for Sustainability (SusTech), 2016
    Co-Authors: José Antonio Hoyo-montaño, Daniel F. Espejel-blanco, Diego G. Schurch-sanchez
    Abstract:

    This paper presents brief overview of a program of retrofitting and control of Academic Buildings. The proposed system has the main objective of reduce the energy consumption of lighting systems and air conditioners (A/C), two of the most common loads found in office and/or classroom Buildings. The proposed BACS implements a two network technologies, Ethernet to connect a central control unit with each building, and a ZigBee mesh wireless network towards the building interior. Buildings energy savings are obtained by combining a turn-on/turn-off control of lamps and A/C, temperature operation adjust of 26°–27°C and retrofitting of conventional lamps with LED lamps. The system has a graphic Human-Machine-Interface that allows a fast system configuration.

Ibrahim Sipan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Buildings and Their Influence on Students’ Wellbeing in Higher Education Institutions
    Social Indicators Research, 2014
    Co-Authors: Shehu Muhammad, Maimunah Sapri, Ibrahim Sipan
    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of students about aspects of Academic building that affect their wellbeing. The study adopts focus group discussion using semi structured interview guide to elicit their responses. Six different groups of students participated in the study. Interviews were recorded using digital audio recorder and were later transcribed to text. The qualitative data obtained was analysed through content analysis. Six key themes that emerged from the analysis are: comfort; health and safety; access and quality of facilities; space provision and adequacy; participation and inclusiveness; interaction. These six items are considered as parameters that are important to students’ wellbeing in relation to Academic Buildings. The most emphasised aspects of Academic building that are essential to meeting students need include thermal conditions, internet access, furniture, duration of access, availability of refreshment facilities, availability of discussion room and availability of personal workstation. This implies that facilities managers in higher education institutions should give adequate attention to these identified aspects of Academic Buildings as they can potentially affect students output.

  • Academic Buildings and Their Influence on Students’ Wellbeing in Higher Education Institutions
    Social Indicators Research, 2013
    Co-Authors: Muhammad, Maimunah Sapri, Ibrahim Sipan
    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of students about aspects of Academic building that affect their wellbeing. The study adopts focus group discussion using semi structured interview guide to elicit their responses. Six different groups of students participated in the study. Interviews were recorded using digital audio recorder and were later transcribed to text. The qualitative data obtained was analysed through content analysis. Six key themes that emerged from the analysis are: comfort; health and safety; access and quality of facilities; space provision and adequacy; participation and inclusiveness; interaction. These six items are considered as parameters that are important to students’ wellbeing in relation to Academic Buildings. The most emphasised aspects of Academic building that are essential to meeting students need include thermal conditions, internet access, furniture, duration of access, availability of refreshment facilities, availability of discussion room and availability of personal workstation. This implies that facilities managers in higher education institutions should give adequate attention to these identified aspects of Academic Buildings as they can potentially affect students output. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014