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Marie-jeanne Perrot-minnot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Differential patterns of definitive host use by two fish Acanthocephalans occurring in sympatry: Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis.
    International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marie-jeanne Perrot-minnot, Emilie Guyonnet, Loïc Bollache, Clément Lagrue

    Abstract:

    Parasites with complex life-cycles and trophic transmission are expected to show low specificity towards final hosts. However, testing this hypothesis may be hampered by low taxonomic resolution, particularly in helminths. We investigated this issue using two intestinal fish parasites with similar life-cycles and occurring in sympatry, Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Acanthocephala). We used species-specific ITS1 length polymorphism to discriminate parasite species from 910 adult Acanthocephalans collected in 174 individual hosts from 12 fish species. Both P. laevis and P. tereticollis exhibited restricted host range within the community of available fish host species, and transmission bias compared to their relative abundance in intermediate hosts. The two parasites also exhibited low niche overlap, primarily due to their contrasting use of bentho-pelagic (P. laevis) and benthic (P. tereticollis) fish. Furthermore, parasite prevalence in intermediate hosts appeared to increase with taxonomic specificity in definitive host use. Comparison of P. laevis and P. tereticollis adult size in the two main definitive hosts, barbel and chub, suggested lower compatibility towards the fish species with the lowest parasite abundance, in particular in P. laevis. The determinants of low niche overlap between these two sympatric Acanthocephalan species, and the contribution of definitive host range diversity to parasite transmission success, are discussed.

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  • Differential patterns of definitive host use by two fish Acanthocephalans occurring in sympatry: Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis
    Elsevier, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marie-jeanne Perrot-minnot, Emilie Guyonnet, Loïc Bollache, Clément Lagrue

    Abstract:

    Parasites with complex life-cycles and trophic transmission are expected to show low specificity towards final hosts. However, testing this hypothesis may be hampered by low taxonomic resolution, particularly in helminths. We investigated this issue using two intestinal fish parasites with similar life-cycles and occurring in sympatry, Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Acanthocephala). We used species-specific ITS1 length polymorphism to discriminate parasite species from 910 adult Acanthocephalans collected in 174 individual hosts from 12 fish species. Both P. laevis and P. tereticollis exhibited restricted host range within the community of available fish host species, and transmission bias compared to their relative abundance in intermediate hosts. The two parasites also exhibited low niche overlap, primarily due to their contrasting use of bentho-pelagic (P. laevis) and benthic (P. tereticollis) fish. Furthermore, parasite prevalence in intermediate hosts appeared to increase with taxonomic specificity in definitive host use. Comparison of P. laevis and P. tereticollis adult size in the two main definitive hosts, barbel and chub, suggested lower compatibility towards the fish species with the lowest parasite abundance, in particular in P. laevis. The determinants of low niche overlap between these two sympatric Acanthocephalan species, and the contribution of definitive host range diversity to parasite transmission success, are discussed. Keywords: Compatibility, Complex life-cycle, Freshwater, Host range, Index, Reproduction, Specificit

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  • Contrasting phylogeography of two Western Palaearctic fish parasites despite similar life cycles.
    Journal of Biogeography, 2018
    Co-Authors: Marie-jeanne Perrot-minnot, Marta Špakulová, Rémi Wattier, Petr Kotlík, Serdar Düşen, Ali Aydoğdu, Christelle Tougard

    Abstract:

    Aim We used comparative phylogeography of two intestinal parasites of freshwater fish to test whether similarity in life cycle translates into concordant phylogeographical history. The thorny-headed worms Pomphorhynchus laevis and P. tereticollis (Acanthocephala) were formerly considered as a single species with a broad geographical and host range within the Western Palaearctic. Location Central and eastern parts of Northern Mediterranean area, Western and Central Europe, Ponto-Caspian Europe. Methods A mitochondrial marker (COI) was sequenced for 111 P. laevis and 50 P. tereticollis individuals and nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 sequences were obtained for 37 P. laevis and 21 P. tereticollis. Genetic divergence, phylogenetic relationships and divergence time were estimated for various lineages within each species, and their phylogeographical patterns were compared to known palaeogeographical events in Western Palaearctic. Biogeographical histories of each species were inferred. Results The two species show very different phylogeographical patterns. Five lineages were identified in P. laevis, partially matching several major biogeographical regions defined in the European riverine fish fauna. The early stages of P. laevis diversification occurred in the peri-Mediterranean area, during the Late Miocene. Subsequent expansion across Western Europe and Russia was shaped by dispersal and vicariant events, from Middle Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene. By contrast, P. tereticollis has differentiated more recently within the Western and Central parts of Europe, and shows weak geographical and genetic structuring. Conclusion Our study highlights weak to moderate similarity in the phylogeographical pattern of these Acanthocephalan parasites compared to their amphipod and fish hosts. The observed differences in the timing of dispersion and migration routes taken may reflect the use of a range of final hosts with different ecologies and dispersal capabilities. By using a group underrepresented in phylogeographical studies, our study is a valuable contribution to revealing the biogeography of host–parasite interactions in continental freshwaters.

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Bernard Marchand – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of cavisoma magnum southwell 1927 Acanthocephala palaeAcanthocephala cavisomidae from siganus lineatus pisces teleostei siganidae valenciennes 1835 in new caledonia
    Micron, 2012
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, Rodney A. Bray, Yann Quilichini, Jeanlou Justine, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an ultrastructural study of Cavisoma magnum (Acanthocephala, Cavisomatidae) with a Transmission Electron Microscopy tool. This parasite of the fish Siganus lineatus is here reported for the first time from off New Caledonia, South Pacific. It is the first study describing the ultrastructure, spermiogenesis and spermatozoon of a species of the family Cavisomatidae. The young spermatid of C. magnum possesses a centriole constituted of doublets without a central element. After the elaboration of a flagellum of 9+2 pattern, the centriole migrates in a nuclear groove. Then the flagellum migration occurs and gives rise to a spermatozoon. The distribution and the size of the protein granules are reported and the posterior extremity appears like a chromatin lamina wave. Comparative ultrastructural data are presented on sperm and spermiogenesis of the Acanthocephala and Rotifers examined to date and the phylogenetic implications are discussed.

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  • Ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (Pallas, 1781) (Acanthocephala: ArchiAcanthocephala), a parasite of the wild boar Sus scrofa.
    The Journal of Parasitology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, Julia-laurence Culioli, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    The present paper describes the ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus, an Acanthocephalan parasite of the wild boar Sus scrofa. At the beginning of spermatogenesis, spermatocytes exhibit synaptonemal complexes and 2 centrioles. In the spermatid, only 1 centriole remains, generating a flagellum with a 9+2 pattern. Another ultrastructural feature observed during the spermiogenesis of M. hirudinaceus is the condensation of the chromatin, forming a “honeycomb” structure in the old spermatid and a homogeneous, electron-dense structure in the spermatozoon. The mature spermatozoon of M. hirudinaceus presents a reversed anatomy, as has been described previously in other species of the Acanthocephala. The spermatozoon is divided into 2 parts: an axoneme, and a nucleocytoplasmic derivative. The spermatozoon flagellum exhibits a 9+2 or 9+0 pattern. The process of spermiogenesis and the ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of M. hirudinaceus are compared with available data regarding other Acanthocephalan species.

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  • ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and spermatozoon of leptorhynchoides plagicephalus Acanthocephala palaeAcanthocephala a parasite of the sturgeon acipenser naccarii osteichthyes acipenseriformes
    Parasitology Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, B S Dezfuli, Barbara Pinelli, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    This paper describes the ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Leptorhynchoides plagicephalus, an Acanthocephalan parasite of the sturgeon Acipenser naccarii, a species which is under the threat of extinction. At the beginning, spermiogenesis in L. plagicephalus is characterized by the presence of a single centriole in the early spermatid. This centriole generates a flagellum with a 9+0 pattern. Another ultrastructural feature observed during the spermiogenesis of L. plagicephalus is the condensation of chromatin to form an “intranuclear wall”. The mature spermatozoon of L. plagicephalus presents a reversed anatomy, as observed in other species of the Acanthocephala. The spermatozoon is divided into two parts: an axoneme and a nucleocytoplasmic derivative. The pattern of spermiogenesis and the ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of L. plagicephalus are compared with information available on other Acanthocephalan species. The appearance of an “intranuclear wall” observed during the present study represents the first record within the Acanthocephala and is unknown from other animal taxa.

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Josephine Foata – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of cavisoma magnum southwell 1927 Acanthocephala palaeAcanthocephala cavisomidae from siganus lineatus pisces teleostei siganidae valenciennes 1835 in new caledonia
    Micron, 2012
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, Rodney A. Bray, Yann Quilichini, Jeanlou Justine, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an ultrastructural study of Cavisoma magnum (Acanthocephala, Cavisomatidae) with a Transmission Electron Microscopy tool. This parasite of the fish Siganus lineatus is here reported for the first time from off New Caledonia, South Pacific. It is the first study describing the ultrastructure, spermiogenesis and spermatozoon of a species of the family Cavisomatidae. The young spermatid of C. magnum possesses a centriole constituted of doublets without a central element. After the elaboration of a flagellum of 9+2 pattern, the centriole migrates in a nuclear groove. Then the flagellum migration occurs and gives rise to a spermatozoon. The distribution and the size of the protein granules are reported and the posterior extremity appears like a chromatin lamina wave. Comparative ultrastructural data are presented on sperm and spermiogenesis of the Acanthocephala and Rotifers examined to date and the phylogenetic implications are discussed.

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  • Ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (Pallas, 1781) (Acanthocephala: ArchiAcanthocephala), a parasite of the wild boar Sus scrofa.
    The Journal of Parasitology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, Julia-laurence Culioli, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    The present paper describes the ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus, an Acanthocephalan parasite of the wild boar Sus scrofa. At the beginning of spermatogenesis, spermatocytes exhibit synaptonemal complexes and 2 centrioles. In the spermatid, only 1 centriole remains, generating a flagellum with a 9+2 pattern. Another ultrastructural feature observed during the spermiogenesis of M. hirudinaceus is the condensation of the chromatin, forming a “honeycomb” structure in the old spermatid and a homogeneous, electron-dense structure in the spermatozoon. The mature spermatozoon of M. hirudinaceus presents a reversed anatomy, as has been described previously in other species of the Acanthocephala. The spermatozoon is divided into 2 parts: an axoneme, and a nucleocytoplasmic derivative. The spermatozoon flagellum exhibits a 9+2 or 9+0 pattern. The process of spermiogenesis and the ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of M. hirudinaceus are compared with available data regarding other Acanthocephalan species.

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  • ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and spermatozoon of leptorhynchoides plagicephalus Acanthocephala palaeAcanthocephala a parasite of the sturgeon acipenser naccarii osteichthyes acipenseriformes
    Parasitology Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Josephine Foata, B S Dezfuli, Barbara Pinelli, Bernard Marchand

    Abstract:

    This paper describes the ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Leptorhynchoides plagicephalus, an Acanthocephalan parasite of the sturgeon Acipenser naccarii, a species which is under the threat of extinction. At the beginning, spermiogenesis in L. plagicephalus is characterized by the presence of a single centriole in the early spermatid. This centriole generates a flagellum with a 9+0 pattern. Another ultrastructural feature observed during the spermiogenesis of L. plagicephalus is the condensation of chromatin to form an “intranuclear wall”. The mature spermatozoon of L. plagicephalus presents a reversed anatomy, as observed in other species of the Acanthocephala. The spermatozoon is divided into two parts: an axoneme and a nucleocytoplasmic derivative. The pattern of spermiogenesis and the ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of L. plagicephalus are compared with information available on other Acanthocephalan species. The appearance of an “intranuclear wall” observed during the present study represents the first record within the Acanthocephala and is unknown from other animal taxa.

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