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Yubao Cui – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • • BRIEF REPORTS •
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Rong-bo Zhang, Yong Huang, Yubao Cui

    Abstract:

    Diagnosis of intestinal Acariasis with avidin-biotin system enzyme-linked immunosorbent assa

  • When mites attack: domestic mites are not just allergens.
    Parasites & vectors, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yubao Cui

    Abstract:

    Domestic mite species found in indoor environments and in warm or tropical regions are well known for causing allergic disorders. However, little is known about human Acariasis, in which mites invade and parasitize the human body in various tissues from the gastrointestinal tract to the lung. Here, we summarize the reported cases of human Acariasis of pulmonary, intestinal, oral (anaphylaxis), urinary, otic, and vaginal systems. Because the clinical symptoms of Acariasis often overlap with other disease symptoms leading to frequent misdiagnosis, we highlight the need for more attention on these infections.

  • When mites attack: domestic mites are not just
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Yubao Cui

    Abstract:

    Domestic mite species found in indoor environments and in warm or tropical regions are well known for causing allergic disorders. However, little is known about human Acariasis, in which mites invade and parasitize the human body in various tissues from the gastrointestinal tract to the lung. Here, we summarize the reported cases of human Acariasis of pulmonary, intestinal, oral (anaphylaxis), urinary, otic, and vaginal systems. Because the clinical symptoms of Acariasis often overlap with other disease symptoms leading to frequent misdiagnosis, we highlight the need for more attention on these infections.

Renato Sergio Marchevsky – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Histopathologic findings of pulmonary Acariasis in a rhesus monkeys breeding unit
    Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia , 2007
    Co-Authors: Márcia Cristina Ribeiro Andrade, Renato Sergio Marchevsky

    Abstract:

    Histological lesions in the lungs of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) related with Pneumonyssus simicola were evidenced. The most prominent pathologic alterations included numerous thin-walled cysts 1-5 mm diameter scattered throughout the lungs, bronchiolitis, peribronchiolitis where the mites were found associated with pigmented and non-pigmented materials. Our study included data from 347 rhesus monkeys submitted to necropsies during 20 years. Four adult debilitated animals were found with pulmonary Acariasis which showed a very low incidence of parasite (1.2%) in the colony. Most of the published literature described as common and widespread pulmonary Acariasis in Old World monkeys. The present study confirms the ubiquity of P. simicola in captive born and raised rhesus monkeys that would compromise experimental studies involving the respiratory system.

Jian Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acaroid mite, intestinal and urinary Acariasis.
    World journal of gastroenterology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Yubao Cui, Jian Wang, Qing-gui Yang, Ye Tian

    Abstract:

    AIM: To investigate epidemiology and pathogenic mite species of intestinal and urinary Acariasis in individuals with different occupations.

    METHODS: A total of 1994 individuals were tested in this study. History collection, skin prick test and pathogen identification were conducted. The mites were isolated from stool and urine samples by saturated saline flotation methods and sieving following centrifugation, respectively.

    RESULTS: Among the 1994 individuals examined, responses to the skin prick test of “+++”, “++”, “+”, “±” and “-” were observed at frequencies of 3.96% (79), 3.21% (64), 2.31% (46), 1.25% (25) and 89.27% (1780), respectively. A total number of 161 (8.07%) individuals were shown to carry mites, with 92 (4.61%) positive only for stool samples, 37 (1.86%) positive only for urine samples and 32 (1.60%) for both. The positive rate of mites in stool samples was 6.22% (124/1994), being 6.84% (78/1140) for males and 5.39% (46/854) for females. No gender difference was observed in this study (χ2 = 1.77, P > 0.05). The mites from stool samples included Acarus siro, TyroPhagus putrescentiae, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus, G.ornatus, Carpoglyphus lactis and Tarsonemus granaries. The positive rate of mites in urine samples was 3.46% (69/1994). The positive rates for male and female subjects were found to be 3.95% (45/1140) and 2.81% (24/854) respectively, with no gender difference observed (χ2 = 1.89, P > 0.05). Mites species in urine samples included Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, T. longior, Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Caloglyphus berlesei, C. mycophagus, Suidasia nesbitti, Lardoglyphus konoi, Glycyphagus domesticus, Carpoglyphus lactis, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Euroglyphus magnei, Caloglyphus hughesi, Tarsonemus granarus and T. hominis. The species of mites in stool and urine samples were consistent with those separated from working environment. A significant difference was found among the frequencies of mite infection in individuals with different occupations (χ2 = 82.55, P < 0.001), with its frequencies in those working in medicinal herb storehouses, those in rice storehouse or mills, miners, railway workers, pupils and teachers being 15.89% (68/428), 12.96% (53/409), 3.28% (18/549), 2.54% (6/236), 5.10% (13/255) and 2.56% (3/117), respectively. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of human intestinal and urinary Acariasis was not associated with gender, and these diseases are more frequently found in individuals working in medicinal herb, rice storehouses or mills and other sites with high density of mites. More attention should be paid to the mite prevention and labor protection for these high-risk groups.

  • Intestinal Acariasis in Anhui Province.
    World journal of gastroenterology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Jian Wang

    Abstract:

    The mites found in stored food and house comprise a large group of subclass Acari, belonging to the suborder Acardida of the order Acariformes. They can be found in dust and vacuum samples from floors, furniture, mattresses, Chinese herb al medicine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, and bedding. These mites are nidico lous and feed on organic debris, including sloughed human skin, fungi, spilled food, pollen, etc. These mites are particularly prevalent in Chinese herbal medi cine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, beds, though carpeted floors near beds or couches may also have large numbers. The most common species are Acarus siro, Ty rophagus putrescentiae, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus, G. Ornatus, Carpoglyphus lactis and Tarsonemus granarius, etc. The viability of mites in storage is quite strong and they can invade and parasitize the intestines of humans[1-15]. They can cause pulmonary Acariasis[16-25], urinary Acariasis[26-33] and so on. The dejecta of mites is a quite strong allergen and can cause different allergic diseases[34-44]. Intestinal Acariasis can be caused by some mites related to the way of diet intake and invading against intestinal mucosa, intestinal muscle [45-58]. The first report of intestinal Acariasis caused by these mites was made by Hinman et al[45] (1934). From then on, all kinds of studies on the disease have been reported gradually. In order to make an epidemiological survey of intestinal Acariasis the investigation of the disease was taken in so me areas of Anhui Province from 1989 to 1996.