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Acarologists

The Experts below are selected from a list of 246 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Zhi-qiang Zhang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Preface to a special volume of acarological papers in memory of Ekaterina Alekseevna Sidorchuk (1981–2019)
    Zootaxa, 2019
    Co-Authors: Zhi-qiang Zhang

    Abstract:

    The acarological and palaeontological communities lost a rising star when Dr Ekaterina Alekseevna (Katya) Sidorchuk passed away in a tragic accident while diving in the Maldives on 20 January 2019. Katya was a good colleague of many Acarologists and much-loved friend of numerous collaborators. She was a highly-valued member of the editing team of Zootaxa , serving as a subject editor for Oribatida (Acari) for several years; her excellent editorial contributions were greatly appreciated by many colleagues and friends. To honour Katya, her colleagues and friends of the acarological world dedicate here a special volume of Zootaxa in her memory.

  • Recognizing high impact in acarological research
    Systematic & Applied Acarology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Zhi-qiang Zhang

    Abstract:

    The impact factor for Systematic and Applied Acarology ( SAA ) in 2017 was announced in the latest release (June 2018) of Journal Citation Reports (JCR) from Clarivate Analytics. I take this opportunity to comment on the growth of SAA’s impact factor and recognize the top 10 most highly cited papers that contributed greatly it. I also introduce the James Allen McMurtry Award, recently instituted by the Systematic and Applied Acarology Society to recognize Acarologists who have made outstanding contributions to systematic and/or applied acarology.

  • Eriophyoidea and allies: where do they belong?
    Systematic & Applied Acarology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Zhi-qiang Zhang

    Abstract:

    The eriophyoid mites are tiny but ancient and very diverse—over 5000 species have been named and described so far (Chetverikov et al. 2015; Bolton et al. 2017; Xue et al. 2017). They have received tremendous attention from Acarologists over the last two decades or so.

Vikram Prasad – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Holotype female of Paraphytoseius scleroticus after 33 years: voucher photos, comments and description of a new genus (Acari: Phytoseiidae)
    persian journal of acarology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Vikram Prasad, Krishna Karmakar

    Abstract:

    Paraphytoseius scleroticus (Gupta & Ray, 1981) known only from the holotype female and having some unique morphological features, was examined and photographed in the Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata, India. Voucher photos included in the present study indicate the presence of setae z2 and z4 on the dorsal shield that are serrated and much longer than in any other known species of the genus Paraphytoseius . Seta S5, unique for representing the cracentis species group Chant & McMurtry, 2003, to which P. scleroticus belongs, is clearly evident lateral to seta Z5. Lyrifissure idm5, not discussed or illustrated by Gupta & Ray (1981), is also present posteromedial to base of seta S5. As type specimens of many mites deteriorate over the years and often no longer show important morphological features, or are not available for study by Acarologists, or are lost due to various reasons, taking voucher photos of the important features of type specimens, especially of soft bodied mites, is strongly suggested. These may be placed online for use by the phytoseiid taxonomists. A new genus, Paraphytoevanseius Prasad gen. nov. , is described and a key for the identification of different genera of the subtribe Paraphytoseiina, including the new genus, and Paraphytoevanseius arjunae (Sadanan-dan, 2006) comb. nov. are given.

  • Obituary: Robert Lee Smiley
    International Journal of Acarology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Vikram Prasad

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The life and achievements of Robert Lee Smiley (1929–2010), prominent U.S. Department of Agriculture acarologist, are recounted, alongside a list of his scientific papers.

  • Study on water-seeking behavior of a Limnochares sp. (Acari: Hydrachnida: Limnocharidae) using a video camera
    International Journal of Acarology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Vikram Prasad

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Water mites have many survival behaviors in both adults and their progeny. Post-larval stages, including adult water mites, have no adaptations for survival outside the aquatic medium and so cannot live long outside this medium. The present paper reveals the water-seeking behavior of a Limnochares sp. (Acari: Limnocaridae) observed using a video camera. It is suggested that Acarologists should use this inexpensive tool to study the many interesting behaviors of mites and ticks.

M. Alejandra Perotti – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Mégnin re-analysed: the case of the newborn baby girl, Paris, 1878
    Experimental and Applied Acarology, 2009
    Co-Authors: M. Alejandra Perotti

    Abstract:

    This paper analyses acarological evidence from a 130-year-old forensic investigation. It was the first case in forensic acarology, i.e., the first case where mites provided substantial information to estimate the post-mortem interval (PMI). In 1878, the mites found in the mummified body of a newborn baby girl in Paris, France, were studied by acarologist and forensic entomologist Jean Pierre Mégnin. Mégnin estimated around 2.4 million mites in the skull and identified them as Tyroglyphus longior (Gervais), a junior synonym of Tyrophagus longior . He suggested that the arrival of these mites at the corpse would have occurred by phoresy on carrier insects, roughly 5 months before the autopsy. There is no doubt about the identification of the mites, Mégnin was a highly respected acarologist. However, two main factors affecting the biology of Tyrophagus mites were not included in the original analysis. First, Mégnin stated that the mites were phoretic. However, he probably did not have access to information about the natural history of the species, because as a rule Tyrophagus mites are non-phoretic. Considering the omnipresence of Tyrophagus mites in soil, most likely the mites will have arrived almost immediately after death. Second, temperature was not taken into account during the estimations of the mite population growth rate. The new analysis is based on current knowledge of Tyrophagus biology and includes temperature, estimated following a handful of weather reports of the years 1877 and 1878. The new projections indicate that non-phoretic mites may have colonised the body just after death and the colony would have built up over 8 months, contrary to the 5 months proposed by Mégnin. This new lapse of time agrees with the PMI proposed by Brouardel: on 15 January 1878 he postulated the death of the newborn to have occurred some 8 months before the autopsy.

  • Mégnin re-analysed: the case of the newborn baby girl, Paris, 1878.
    Experimental and Applied Acarology, 2009
    Co-Authors: M. Alejandra Perotti

    Abstract:

    This paper analyses acarological evidence from a 130-year-old forensic investigation. It was the first case in forensic acarology, i.e., the first case where mites provided substantial information to estimate the post-mortem interval (PMI). In 1878, the mites found in the mummified body of a newborn baby girl in Paris, France, were studied by acarologist and forensic entomologist Jean Pierre Megnin. Megnin estimated around 2.4 million mites in the skull and identified them as Tyroglyphus longior (Gervais), a junior synonym of Tyrophagus longior. He suggested that the arrival of these mites at the corpse would have occurred by phoresy on carrier insects, roughly 5 months before the autopsy. There is no doubt about the identification of the mites, Megnin was a highly respected acarologist. However, two main factors affecting the biology of Tyrophagus mites were not included in the original analysis. First, Megnin stated that the mites were phoretic. However, he probably did not have access to information about the natural history of the species, because as a rule Tyrophagus mites are non-phoretic. Considering the omnipresence of Tyrophagus mites in soil, most likely the mites will have arrived almost immediately after death. Second, temperature was not taken into account during the estimations of the mite population growth rate. The new analysis is based on current knowledge of Tyrophagus biology and includes temperature, estimated following a handful of weather reports of the years 1877 and 1878. The new projections indicate that non-phoretic mites may have colonised the body just after death and the colony would have built up over 8 months, contrary to the 5 months proposed by Megnin. This new lapse of time agrees with the PMI proposed by Brouardel: on 15 January 1878 he postulated the death of the newborn to have occurred some 8 months before the autopsy.