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Accidental Injury

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Justin Kenardy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Involving Parents in Indicated Early Intervention for Childhood PTSD Following Accidental Injury
    Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 2012
    Co-Authors: Vanessa E. Cobham, Sonja March, Alexandra Young, Fiona Leeson, Reginald Nixon, Brett Mcdermott, Justin Kenardy

    Abstract:

    Accidental injuries represent the most common type of traumatic event to which a youth is likely to be exposed. While the majority of youth who experience an Accidental Injury will recover spontaneously, a significant proportion will go on to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). And yet, there is little published treatment outcome research in this area. This review focuses on two key issues within the child PTSD literature—namely the role of parents in treatment and the timing of intervention. The issue of parental involvement in the treatment of child PTSD is a question that is increasingly being recognized as important. In addition, the need to find a balance between providing early intervention to at risk youth while avoiding providing treatment to those youth who will recover spontaneously has yet to be addressed. This paper outlines the rationale for and the development of a trauma-focused CBT protocol with separate parent and child programs, for use with children and adolescents experiencing PTSD following an Accidental Injury. The protocol is embedded within an indicated intervention framework, allowing for the early identification of youth at risk within a medical setting. Two case studies are presented in order to illustrate key issues raised in the review, implementation of the interventions, and the challenges involved.

  • parental response to child Injury examination of parental posttraumatic stress symptom trajectories following child Accidental Injury
    Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Robyne Le Brocque, Joan Hendrikz, Justin Kenardy

    Abstract:

    Objective Trajectory analyses were used to empirically differentiate patterns of posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents following child Accidental Injury and explore the relationship between parent and child recovery patterns. Method Parent (n ¼189) self-reported symptoms from acute to 2 years post accident were examined to (1) identify distinct parent symptom trajectories; (2) identify risk factors; and (3) explore the patterns of children and parents together. Results Analysis revealed three distinct symptom trajectory groups for parents: resilient (78%); clinical level acute symptoms that declined to below clinical level by 6 months (recovery 8%); and chronic subclinical (14%). Children of resilient parents were most likely to be resilient. Half of the children of parents with chronic subclinical trajectories were likely to have chronic trajectories. Conclusion Clinicians cannot rely only on clinical level symptoms in parents to identify high risk families but include families where the parent has subclinical level symptoms.

  • information provision intervention for children and their parents following pediatric Accidental Injury
    European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2008
    Co-Authors: Justin Kenardy, Katie Thompson, Robyne Le Brocque, Katherine Olsson

    Abstract:

    Objective
    This study evaluated an early intervention for children and their parents following pediatric Accidental Injury.

Robyne Le Brocque – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • parental response to child Injury examination of parental posttraumatic stress symptom trajectories following child Accidental Injury
    Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Robyne Le Brocque, Joan Hendrikz, Justin Kenardy

    Abstract:

    Objective Trajectory analyses were used to empirically differentiate patterns of posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents following child Accidental Injury and explore the relationship between parent and child recovery patterns. Method Parent (n ¼189) self-reported symptoms from acute to 2 years post accident were examined to (1) identify distinct parent symptom trajectories; (2) identify risk factors; and (3) explore the patterns of children and parents together. Results Analysis revealed three distinct symptom trajectory groups for parents: resilient (78%); clinical level acute symptoms that declined to below clinical level by 6 months (recovery 8%); and chronic subclinical (14%). Children of resilient parents were most likely to be resilient. Half of the children of parents with chronic subclinical trajectories were likely to have chronic trajectories. Conclusion Clinicians cannot rely only on clinical level symptoms in parents to identify high risk families but include families where the parent has subclinical level symptoms.

  • information provision intervention for children and their parents following pediatric Accidental Injury
    European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2008
    Co-Authors: Justin Kenardy, Katie Thompson, Robyne Le Brocque, Katherine Olsson

    Abstract:

    Objective
    This study evaluated an early intervention for children and their parents following pediatric Accidental Injury.

H. Carty – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Non-Accidental Injury: a review of the radiology
    European Radiology, 1997
    Co-Authors: H. Carty

    Abstract:

    There have been many descriptions of the radiological features of non-Accidental Injury since John Caffey introduced the concept of inflicted Injury and initially described some of the patterns of Injury. Since then, our understanding of the radiologically detectable injuries has increased. This article provides a review of our current understanding of the lesions.