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B Kawecka – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • benthic diatoms of an alpine stream lake network in switzerland
    Aquatic Sciences, 2005
    Co-Authors: Christopher T. Robinson, B Kawecka

    Abstract:

    We compared the benthic diatom composition of lakes, and lake inlet and outlet streams in a high elevation catchment (∼2600 m a.s.l.) in the Swiss Alps. The catchment consisted of a southern basin mostly fed by glacial-melt water and a northern basin fed by snowmelt and groundwater. Streams in both basins flowed through a series of small lakes before converging into a lake with a primary outlet channel. The south basin had on average 4°C cooler water temperatures and 2× higher nitrate-N levels (up to 300 μg/L) than the north basin. In contrast, the north basin had higher levels (2–4×) of particulate-P, particulate-N, and particulate organic matter than the south basin. A total of 109 and 143 diatom species was identified in lakes and streams, respectively, with a similar number of species found in each basin. Aulacoseira alpigena and Achnanthidium minutissimum were common benthic algae in north basin lakes, whereas Achnanthes subatomoides, Achnanthes marginulata, Pinnularia microstauron, and Psammothidium helveticum were most common in south basin lakes. One disconnected lake in the north basin had an assemblage dominated by Tabellaria flocculosa (66%) and Eunotia tenella (14%). Principal components analysis showed a clear separation between the north and south basins in lotic diatoms. Of the 10 most common species, streams in the south basin had greater abundances of Psammothidium helveticum, Achnanthes helvetica var. minor, Achnanthes marginulata, Achnanthes subatomoides, and Diatoma mesodon than the north basin, whereas north basin streams had higher abundances of Achnanthidium minutissimum, Aulacoseira alpigena, and Luticola goeppertiana. Lake outlet assemblages were similar to respective downstream lake inlet assemblages, and assemblages changed in composition along each basins longitudinal flow path. However, Aulacoseira alpigena had higher average abundances in north basin outlets than inlets, and Achnanthidium minutissimum, Psammothidium helveticum, and Achnanthes helvetica var. minor had higher average abundances in south basin outlets than inlets. In contrast, Diatoma mesodon, Fragilaria capucina, and Gomphonema parvulum had higher average abundances in south basin inlets than outlets. The spatial patterns in species composition reflected the hierarchical interaction of landscape features (geology, hydrology) on longitudinal gradients (lake position) in the stream/lake network.

  • Benthic diatoms of an Alpine stream/lake network in Switzerland
    Aquatic Sciences, 2005
    Co-Authors: Christopher T. Robinson, B Kawecka

    Abstract:

    We compared the benthic diatom composition of lakes, and lake inlet and outlet streams in a high elevation catchment (∼2600 m a.s.l.) in the Swiss Alps. The catchment consisted of a southern basin mostly fed by glacial-melt water and a northern basin fed by snowmelt and groundwater. Streams in both basins flowed through a series of small lakes before converging into a lake with a primary outlet channel. The south basin had on average 4°C cooler water temperatures and 2× higher nitrate-N levels (up to 300 μg/L) than the north basin. In contrast, the north basin had higher levels (2–4×) of particulate-P, particulate-N, and particulate organic matter than the south basin. A total of 109 and 143 diatom species was identified in lakes and streams, respectively, with a similar number of species found in each basin. Aulacoseira alpigena and Achnanthidium minutissimum were common benthic algae in north basin lakes, whereas Achnanthes subatomoides, Achnanthes marginulata, Pinnularia microstauron, and Psammothidium helveticum were most common in south basin lakes. One disconnected lake in the north basin had an assemblage dominated by Tabellaria flocculosa (66%) and Eunotia tenella (14%). Principal components analysis showed a clear separation between the north and south basins in lotic diatoms. Of the 10 most common species, streams in the south basin had greater abundances of Psammothidium helveticum, Achnanthes helvetica var. minor, Achnanthes marginulata, Achnanthes subatomoides, and Diatoma mesodon than the north basin, whereas north basin streams had higher abundances of Achnanthidium minutissimum, Aulacoseira alpigena, and Luticola goeppertiana. Lake outlet assemblages were similar to respective downstream lake inlet assemblages, and assemblages changed in composition along each basins longitudinal flow path. However, Aulacoseira alpigena had higher average abundances in north basin outlets than inlets, and Achnanthidium minutissimum, Psammothidium helveticum, and Achnanthes helvetica var. minor had higher average abundances in south basin outlets than inlets. In contrast, Diatoma mesodon, Fragilaria capucina, and Gomphonema parvulum had higher average abundances in south basin inlets than outlets. The spatial patterns in species composition reflected the hierarchical interaction of landscape features (geology, hydrology) on longitudinal gradients (lake position) in the stream/lake network.

  • Diversity of epilithic diatoms in high mountain lakes under the stress of acidification (Tatra Mts, Poland)
    Annales de Limnologie – International Journal of Limnology, 2003
    Co-Authors: B Kawecka, Joanna Galas

    Abstract:

    Using the epilithic diatoms as indicators of environmental conditions, 10 lakes in the High Tatra Mountains were characterised with regard to their stage of acidification. The diatom communities were diverse; 210 taxa were found, including 27 species of north and alpine preference. On the basis of cluster analysis, two groups of lakes were distinguished. The first group included shallow, moderately acidified lakes (Dlugi and Zmarzly Gasienicowy lakes), where acidophilous organisms prevailed, with Achnanthes marginulata being the most numerous. The structure of the diatom community in Dlugi lake was stable over 4 years of observations and did not show any progress in acidification. The second group included mostly very deep, non-acidified lakes where circumneutral organisms prevailed, and among them Achnanthes minutissima was dominant in most cases. The diatom community structures mostly confirmed the status of the lakes studied as judged from their water chemistry.

Myung-soo Han – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ecological Studies on Togyo Reservoir in Chulwon, Korea. 7. The Colonization of Epilithic Algae on Artificial Substrata (Tiles) at Mesocosm
    ALGAE, 2004
    Co-Authors: Kyung Ha Lee, Sook-kyung Yoon, Myung-soo Han

    Abstract:

    Patterns of epilithic algal colonization on artificial substrata (unglazed ceramic tiles) were investigated from 23rd April to 3rd July 1999 at weekly intervals over a 10 weeks period outside and inside the mesocosm in Togyo reservoir within the Civilian Passage Restriction Line near Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in Korea. The highest standing crops of epilithic algae was 1,79810³ cells outside the mesocosm on 26th June and also inside the mesocosm those was 2,39110³ cells on 26th June, 9 weeks after the experiment began. The dominants outside the mesocosm were Achnanthes minutissima, Navicula bicephala, Oscillatoria angusta, Synedra delicastissima, S. tenuissima, S. ulna v. danica and Tabellaria flocculosa, and those inside the mesocosm were Achnanthes minitissima, Coenochloris polycocca, Fragilaria crotonenesis, Peridinium cinctum, Synedra delicatissima, Tabellaria flocculosa and Ulothrix subtilissima. Diatoms were most abundant and Achnanthes minutissima was the most important species colonizing on the tiles. Chlorophyll-a content was highest value of 5.4 mg on 19th June after 8 weeks growth outside the mesocosm and was 24.4 mg on 26th June, 9 weeks after the experiment began on tiles inside the mesocosm. It was also shown that unglazed ceramic tiles were a more suitable substratum for colonization than the glass slides. Consequently the substratum selection plays an important role in the colonization by the epilithic algal community.

  • Ecological Studies on Togyo Reservoir in Chulwon, Korea. 8. The Epilithic Algal Community after the Experimental Acidification on the Artificial Substrata (Tiles) at Mesocosm
    ALGAE, 2004
    Co-Authors: Kyung Ha Lee, Sook-kyung Yoon, Myung-soo Han

    Abstract:

    The epilithic algal communities on the artificial substrata (unglazed ceramic tiles) were investigated from 5th July to 24th July 1999 with two or three days intervals for elucidating the effects of the experimental acidification. They were harvested inside the mesocosm with and without the acid treatment on Togyo reservoir within the Civilian Passage Restriction Line near Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in Korea. After the colonization of epilithic algal community, their standing crops revealed different patterns outside and inside the mesocosm. However the time lapse of 5 days was observed on the inside with acid treatment. The dominant species were different: Achnanthes minutissima was outside but Coenochloris polycocca was inside and inside with acid treatment. The differences in floral composition were also found. Achnanthes minutissima which has been the most important species in the colonization by the epilithic algal community of the mesocosm was less important at the lower pH. Coenochloris polycocca is a species well adapted to low pH.

Christopher T. Robinson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • benthic diatoms of an alpine stream lake network in switzerland
    Aquatic Sciences, 2005
    Co-Authors: Christopher T. Robinson, B Kawecka

    Abstract:

    We compared the benthic diatom composition of lakes, and lake inlet and outlet streams in a high elevation catchment (∼2600 m a.s.l.) in the Swiss Alps. The catchment consisted of a southern basin mostly fed by glacial-melt water and a northern basin fed by snowmelt and groundwater. Streams in both basins flowed through a series of small lakes before converging into a lake with a primary outlet channel. The south basin had on average 4°C cooler water temperatures and 2× higher nitrate-N levels (up to 300 μg/L) than the north basin. In contrast, the north basin had higher levels (2–4×) of particulate-P, particulate-N, and particulate organic matter than the south basin. A total of 109 and 143 diatom species was identified in lakes and streams, respectively, with a similar number of species found in each basin. Aulacoseira alpigena and Achnanthidium minutissimum were common benthic algae in north basin lakes, whereas Achnanthes subatomoides, Achnanthes marginulata, Pinnularia microstauron, and Psammothidium helveticum were most common in south basin lakes. One disconnected lake in the north basin had an assemblage dominated by Tabellaria flocculosa (66%) and Eunotia tenella (14%). Principal components analysis showed a clear separation between the north and south basins in lotic diatoms. Of the 10 most common species, streams in the south basin had greater abundances of Psammothidium helveticum, Achnanthes helvetica var. minor, Achnanthes marginulata, Achnanthes subatomoides, and Diatoma mesodon than the north basin, whereas north basin streams had higher abundances of Achnanthidium minutissimum, Aulacoseira alpigena, and Luticola goeppertiana. Lake outlet assemblages were similar to respective downstream lake inlet assemblages, and assemblages changed in composition along each basins longitudinal flow path. However, Aulacoseira alpigena had higher average abundances in north basin outlets than inlets, and Achnanthidium minutissimum, Psammothidium helveticum, and Achnanthes helvetica var. minor had higher average abundances in south basin outlets than inlets. In contrast, Diatoma mesodon, Fragilaria capucina, and Gomphonema parvulum had higher average abundances in south basin inlets than outlets. The spatial patterns in species composition reflected the hierarchical interaction of landscape features (geology, hydrology) on longitudinal gradients (lake position) in the stream/lake network.

  • Benthic diatoms of an Alpine stream/lake network in Switzerland
    Aquatic Sciences, 2005
    Co-Authors: Christopher T. Robinson, B Kawecka

    Abstract:

    We compared the benthic diatom composition of lakes, and lake inlet and outlet streams in a high elevation catchment (∼2600 m a.s.l.) in the Swiss Alps. The catchment consisted of a southern basin mostly fed by glacial-melt water and a northern basin fed by snowmelt and groundwater. Streams in both basins flowed through a series of small lakes before converging into a lake with a primary outlet channel. The south basin had on average 4°C cooler water temperatures and 2× higher nitrate-N levels (up to 300 μg/L) than the north basin. In contrast, the north basin had higher levels (2–4×) of particulate-P, particulate-N, and particulate organic matter than the south basin. A total of 109 and 143 diatom species was identified in lakes and streams, respectively, with a similar number of species found in each basin. Aulacoseira alpigena and Achnanthidium minutissimum were common benthic algae in north basin lakes, whereas Achnanthes subatomoides, Achnanthes marginulata, Pinnularia microstauron, and Psammothidium helveticum were most common in south basin lakes. One disconnected lake in the north basin had an assemblage dominated by Tabellaria flocculosa (66%) and Eunotia tenella (14%). Principal components analysis showed a clear separation between the north and south basins in lotic diatoms. Of the 10 most common species, streams in the south basin had greater abundances of Psammothidium helveticum, Achnanthes helvetica var. minor, Achnanthes marginulata, Achnanthes subatomoides, and Diatoma mesodon than the north basin, whereas north basin streams had higher abundances of Achnanthidium minutissimum, Aulacoseira alpigena, and Luticola goeppertiana. Lake outlet assemblages were similar to respective downstream lake inlet assemblages, and assemblages changed in composition along each basins longitudinal flow path. However, Aulacoseira alpigena had higher average abundances in north basin outlets than inlets, and Achnanthidium minutissimum, Psammothidium helveticum, and Achnanthes helvetica var. minor had higher average abundances in south basin outlets than inlets. In contrast, Diatoma mesodon, Fragilaria capucina, and Gomphonema parvulum had higher average abundances in south basin inlets than outlets. The spatial patterns in species composition reflected the hierarchical interaction of landscape features (geology, hydrology) on longitudinal gradients (lake position) in the stream/lake network.