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Acrylamide

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Walter C. Willett – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • dietary Acrylamide intake and risk of premenopausal breast cancer
    American Journal of Epidemiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Kathryn M. Wilson, Lorelei A Mucci, David J Hunter, Wendy Y Chen, Walter C. Willett

    Abstract:

    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-temperature cooking of many commonly consumed foods. It is widespread; approximately 30% of calories consumed in the United States are from foods containing Acrylamide. In animal studies, Acrylamide causes mammary tumors, but it is unknown whether the level of Acrylamide in foods affects human breast cancer risk. The authors studied the association between Acrylamide intake and breast cancer risk among 90,628 premenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. They calculated Acrylamide intake from food frequency questionnaires in 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2003. From 1991 through 2005, they documented 1,179 cases of invasive breast cancer. They used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between Acrylamide and breast cancer risk. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk of premenopausal breast cancer was 0.92 (95% confidence interval: 0.76, 1.11) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of Acrylamide intake (Ptrend = 0.61). Results were similar regardless of smoking status or estrogen and progesterone receptor status of the tumors. The authors found no associations between intakes of foods high in Acrylamide, including French fries, coffee, cereal, potato chips, potatoes, and baked goods, and breast cancer risk. They found no evidence that Acrylamide intake, within the range of US diets, is associated with increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer.

  • Validation of a food frequency questionnaire measurement of dietary Acrylamide intake using hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide
    Cancer Causes & Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Kathryn M. Wilson, Hubert W Vesper, Margareta Törnqvist, Paula Tocco, Laura Sampson, Johan Rosén, Karl-erik Hellenäs, Walter C. Willett

    Abstract:

    Objective Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-heat cooking of many common foods. The validity of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measures of Acrylamide intake has not been established. We assessed the validity of Acrylamide intake calculated from an FFQ using a biomarker of Acrylamide exposure. Methods We calculated Acrylamide intake from an FFQ in the Nurses’ Health Study II. We measured hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and its metabolite, glycidamide, in a random sample of 342 women. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between Acrylamide intakes and adducts. Results The correlation between Acrylamide intake and the sum of Acrylamide and glycidamide adducts was 0.31 (95% CI: 0.20–0.41), adjusted for laboratory batch, energy intake, and age. Further adjustment for BMI, alcohol intake, and correction for random within-person measurement error in adducts gave a correlation of 0.34 (CI: 0.23–0.45). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the sum of adducts was 0.77 in blood samples collected 1–3 years apart in a subset of 45 women. Intake of several foods significantly predicted adducts in multiple regression. Conclusions Acrylamide intake and hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide were moderately correlated. Within-person consistency in adducts was high over time.

  • validation of a food frequency questionnaire measurement of dietary Acrylamide intake using hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide
    Cancer Causes & Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Kathryn M. Wilson, Hubert W Vesper, Margareta Törnqvist, Walter C. Willett, Paula Tocco, Laura Sampson, Johan Rosén, Karl-erik Hellenäs

    Abstract:

    Objective
    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-heat cooking of many common foods. The validity of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measures of Acrylamide intake has not been established. We assessed the validity of Acrylamide intake calculated from an FFQ using a biomarker of Acrylamide exposure.

Bruno De Meulenaer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Acrylamide in Potato Products
    Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Bruno De Meulenaer, Raquel Medeiros, Frédéric Mestdagh

    Abstract:

    Abstract Acrylamide is proven to be carcinogenic in rodents and a “probable” human carcinogen, with increasing evidence of positive associations with human cancers. Thus, authorities and industry are asking for solutions for Acrylamide formation, while no legal limits have yet been established for Acrylamide in foods. Most of the Acrylamide dietary exposure results from potato products, coffee, bakery products, and chocolate. Acrylamide is formed in potato products during industrial processing, retail, catering, and home preparation. This review summarizes the research as of this writing on Acrylamide levels, mechanisms of formation, assessment of Acrylamide intake and health risk, regulatory status, and possible mitigation strategies from farm to fork in fried potato products. Furthermore, relevant issues regarding the implementation of mitigation strategies on an industrial scale are discussed and options for risk management summarized. In conclusion, “lab-scale studies” in Acrylamide mitigation research should be interpreted with utmost care. This leads to the pertinent question “What is the next step to reduce Acrylamide exposure while maintaining the expected product quality for the consumer?”

  • Acrylamide formation in fried potato products present and future a critical review on mitigation strategies
    Food Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Raquel Catarino Medeiros Vinci, Frédéric Mestdagh, Bruno De Meulenaer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Acrylamide is proven to be carcinogenic in rodents and a ‘probable’ human carcinogen, with increasing evidence of positive associations with human cancers. Thus, authorities and industry urge to find solutions for Acrylamide formation, while no legal limits have yet been established for this contaminant in foods. Most of the Acrylamide dietary exposure results from potato products, coffee, bakery products and chocolate. Acrylamide is formed in potato products during industrial processing, retail, catering and home preparation. This review summarizes the research to date on Acrylamide levels, mechanisms of formation, assessment of Acrylamide intake and health risk, and possible mitigation strategies from farm to fork in fried potato products. Furthermore, relevant issues regarding the implementation of mitigation strategies on an industrial scale are discussed and evolution of risk management summarized. In conclusion, ‘lab scale studies’ in Acrylamide mitigation research should be interpreted with utmost care. This leads to the pertinent question “What is the next step to reduce Acrylamide exposure while maintaining the expected product quality for the consumer?”

Hubert W Vesper – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Validation of a food frequency questionnaire measurement of dietary Acrylamide intake using hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide
    Cancer Causes & Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Kathryn M. Wilson, Hubert W Vesper, Margareta Törnqvist, Paula Tocco, Laura Sampson, Johan Rosén, Karl-erik Hellenäs, Walter C. Willett

    Abstract:

    Objective Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-heat cooking of many common foods. The validity of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measures of Acrylamide intake has not been established. We assessed the validity of Acrylamide intake calculated from an FFQ using a biomarker of Acrylamide exposure. Methods We calculated Acrylamide intake from an FFQ in the Nurses’ Health Study II. We measured hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and its metabolite, glycidamide, in a random sample of 342 women. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between Acrylamide intakes and adducts. Results The correlation between Acrylamide intake and the sum of Acrylamide and glycidamide adducts was 0.31 (95% CI: 0.20–0.41), adjusted for laboratory batch, energy intake, and age. Further adjustment for BMI, alcohol intake, and correction for random within-person measurement error in adducts gave a correlation of 0.34 (CI: 0.23–0.45). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the sum of adducts was 0.77 in blood samples collected 1–3 years apart in a subset of 45 women. Intake of several foods significantly predicted adducts in multiple regression. Conclusions Acrylamide intake and hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide were moderately correlated. Within-person consistency in adducts was high over time.

  • validation of a food frequency questionnaire measurement of dietary Acrylamide intake using hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and glycidamide
    Cancer Causes & Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Kathryn M. Wilson, Hubert W Vesper, Margareta Törnqvist, Walter C. Willett, Paula Tocco, Laura Sampson, Johan Rosén, Karl-erik Hellenäs

    Abstract:

    Objective
    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-heat cooking of many common foods. The validity of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measures of Acrylamide intake has not been established. We assessed the validity of Acrylamide intake calculated from an FFQ using a biomarker of Acrylamide exposure.

  • Assessing Human Exposure To Acrylamide
    , 2005
    Co-Authors: Hubert W Vesper, Tunde Meyers, Maria Ospina, Antoinette Smith, Leigha Ingham, G. Gray, Gary L. Myers

    Abstract:

    Acrylamide is considered as probably carcinogenic to humans. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) rates it as a Group 2A reagent. Therefore, human exposure to Acrylamide in occupational settings has been of concern for a long time. Until recently, tobacco smoke was assumed to be the only major source of Acrylamide exposure in the general population. Now, it is well established that Acrylamide is formed in food during processing or cooking at high temperatures. Surveys showed that Acrylamide can be found in most types of food, with highest amounts measured in French fries and potato chips. The concentrations found in some foods exceed the concentrations found for other environmental contaminants, such as pesticides. The Division of Laboratory Sciences at CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health, through a biomonitoring program project, is assessing people’s exposure to this chemical. The goal is to better assess the magnitude and distribution of human exposure to Acrylamide and risks associated with this exposure in the general population. Project researchers are measuring biomarkers of exposure such as hemoglobin adducts of Acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide. First assessments show that biomarker levels mainly range between 27 pmol/g globin and 148 pmol/g globin for Acrylamide and glycidamide adducts, respectively. Biomarker values in smokers are about 3 to 4 times higher than in non-smokers. An initial study looked at the effects of Acrylamide in food on biomarkers of Acrylamide exposure. Results indicate that Acrylamide consumed through food has a more profound effect on glycidamide adduct levels than on Acrylamide adduct levels. The Acrylamide biomarker concentrations determined so far are within the range reported by other investigators. Smoking appears to be an important contributor to the background exposure found in people.