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Actinomyces

The Experts below are selected from a list of 294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Matthew D. Collins – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Actinomyces vaccimaxillae sp. nov., from the jaw of a cow.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Val Hall, Matthew D. Collins, Enevold Falsen, Roger A Hutson, Elisabeth Inganäs, Brian I Duerden

    Abstract:

    A previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from a lesion in the jaw of a cow. Based on its cellular morphology and the results of biochemical testing, the organism was tentatively identified as a member of the genus Actinomyces. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies showed that the bacterium represents a hitherto unknown species within the genus Actinomyces, and is related to a group of species that includes Actinomyces turicensis and its close relatives. It is proposed that the unknown organism be classified as Actinomyces vaccimaxillae sp. nov. (the type strain is CCUG 46091T=CIP 107423T).

  • Actinomyces oricola sp. nov., from a human dental abscess.
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Val Hall, Matthew D. Collins, Enevold Falsen, Roger A Hutson, Elisabeth Inganäs, Brian I Duerden

    Abstract:

    A previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from a human dental abscess. Based on its cellular morphology and the results of biochemical testing the organism was tentatively identified as a member of the genus Actinomyces, but it did not correspond to any currently recognized species of this genus. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies showed the bacterium represents a hitherto unknown subline within the genus Actinomyces, clustering within a group of species, which includes Actinomyces bovis, the type species of the genus. Based on biochemical and molecular phylogenetic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown organism recovered from a dental abscess be classified as a new species, Actinomyces oricola sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces oricola is R5292(T) (=CCUG 46090(T)=CIP 107639(T)).

  • Actinomyces coleocanis sp. nov., from the vagina of a dog.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Lesley Hoyles, Enevold Falsen, Geoffrey Foster, Matthew D. Collins

    Abstract:

    A hitherto undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from the vagina of a dog. Biochemical testing and PAGE analysis of whole-cell proteins indicated that the isolate was phenotypically different from previously described Actinomyces species and related taxa. Sequencing of 165 rRNA showed that the unknown bacterium was distinct from all currently known Actinomyces species. Phylogenetically, the unidentified organism displayed a specific association with Actinomyces europaeus, but a sequence divergence of > 5% demonstrated that it represents a distinct species. Based on both phenotypic and 165 rRNA sequence considerations, it is proposed that the unknown strain from a dog be classified as a novel species, Actinomyces coleocanis sp. nov. The type strain is CCUG 41708T (= CIP 106873T).

Enevold Falsen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Actinomyces vaccimaxillae sp. nov., from the jaw of a cow.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Val Hall, Matthew D. Collins, Enevold Falsen, Roger A Hutson, Elisabeth Inganäs, Brian I Duerden

    Abstract:

    A previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from a lesion in the jaw of a cow. Based on its cellular morphology and the results of biochemical testing, the organism was tentatively identified as a member of the genus Actinomyces. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies showed that the bacterium represents a hitherto unknown species within the genus Actinomyces, and is related to a group of species that includes Actinomyces turicensis and its close relatives. It is proposed that the unknown organism be classified as Actinomyces vaccimaxillae sp. nov. (the type strain is CCUG 46091T=CIP 107423T).

  • Actinomyces oricola sp. nov., from a human dental abscess.
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Val Hall, Matthew D. Collins, Enevold Falsen, Roger A Hutson, Elisabeth Inganäs, Brian I Duerden

    Abstract:

    A previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from a human dental abscess. Based on its cellular morphology and the results of biochemical testing the organism was tentatively identified as a member of the genus Actinomyces, but it did not correspond to any currently recognized species of this genus. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies showed the bacterium represents a hitherto unknown subline within the genus Actinomyces, clustering within a group of species, which includes Actinomyces bovis, the type species of the genus. Based on biochemical and molecular phylogenetic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown organism recovered from a dental abscess be classified as a new species, Actinomyces oricola sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces oricola is R5292(T) (=CCUG 46090(T)=CIP 107639(T)).

  • Actinomyces coleocanis sp. nov., from the vagina of a dog.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Lesley Hoyles, Enevold Falsen, Geoffrey Foster, Matthew D. Collins

    Abstract:

    A hitherto undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium was isolated from the vagina of a dog. Biochemical testing and PAGE analysis of whole-cell proteins indicated that the isolate was phenotypically different from previously described Actinomyces species and related taxa. Sequencing of 165 rRNA showed that the unknown bacterium was distinct from all currently known Actinomyces species. Phylogenetically, the unidentified organism displayed a specific association with Actinomyces europaeus, but a sequence divergence of > 5% demonstrated that it represents a distinct species. Based on both phenotypic and 165 rRNA sequence considerations, it is proposed that the unknown strain from a dog be classified as a novel species, Actinomyces coleocanis sp. nov. The type strain is CCUG 41708T (= CIP 106873T).

Guido Funke – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Actinomyces europaeus sp nov isolated from human clinical specimens
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Guido Funke, Enevold Falsen, Cristina Pascual, Norbert Weiss, Eva Akervall, Nerea Alvarez, Luc Sabbe, Leo M Schouls, Matthew D. Collins

    Abstract:

    Ten strains of a hitherto undescribed catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coryneform bacterium were isolated or collected by workers at three European clinical bacteriology laboratories or reference centers. These strains were isolated from humans, and most came from abscess material. Biochemical and chemotaxonomic characterization revealed that the strains belonged to the genus Actinomyces. The phenotypic features of the 10 strains were incompatible with the descriptions of the previously established Actinomyces species. A comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that the previously undescribed strains constitute a new line in the genus Actinomyces. The name Actinomyces europaeus sp. nov. is proposed for these clinical isolates. The type strain is CCUG 32789A.

  • assignment of Actinomyces pyogenes like cdc coryneform group e bacteria to the genus Actinomyces as Actinomyces radingae sp nov and Actinomyces turicensis sp nov
    Letters in Applied Microbiology, 1995
    Co-Authors: J Wust, S Stubbs, Guido Funke, Norbert Weiss, Matthew D. Collins

    Abstract:

    In a previous study the authors reported the characterization of some facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-sporeforming rods which were found in mixed cultures from various infectious processes, including patients with otitis, empyema, perianal abscesses and decubitus ulcers. Phenotypically these organisms closely resembled Actinomyces pyogenes although their precise taxonomic position remained unknown. In the present investigation the authors have determined the 16S rRNA gene sequences of some representative strains of the Actinomyces pyogenes-like bacteria and report the results of a comparative sequence analysis. On the basis of the results of the present and earlier findings two new Actinomyces species, Actinomyces radingae sp. nov. and Actinomyces turicensis sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are DSM 9169 T and DSM 9168 T , respectively.

  • description of human derived centers for disease control coryneform group 2 bacteria as Actinomyces bernardiae sp nov
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Guido Funke, Cristina Pascual Ramos, Norbert Weiss, Jose F Fernandezgarayzabal, Matthew D. Collins

    Abstract:

    Biochemical, chemotaxonomic, and molecular methods were used to establish the precise taxonomic position of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) coryneform group 2 bacteria. The results of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the CDC coryneform group 2 bacteria constitute a distinct species within the genus Actinomyces. Actinomyces pyogenes was found to be the closest genealogical relative of the CDC coryneform group 2 bacteria, although these taxa were readily distinguished from each other and other Actinomyces spp. by using phenotypic criteria. On the basis of our findings we propose the name Actinomyces bernardiae sp. nov. for the CDC coryneform group 2 bacteria. The type strain is DSM 9152 (CCUG 33419).