Acute Stress - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acute Stress

The Experts below are selected from a list of 116886 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Acute Stress – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Richard A. Bryant – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Current Evidence for Acute Stress Disorder.
    Current Psychiatry Reports, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant
    Abstract:

    The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current evidence pertaining to the course of Acute and chronic posttraumatic Stress, the diagnosis of Acute Stress disorder (ASD), and treatment of Acute Stress disorder and prevention of posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). Although Acute Stress disorder was introduced partly to predict subsequent PTSD, longitudinal studies indicate that ASD is not an accurate predictor of PTSD. Recent analytic approaches adopting latent growth mixture modeling have shown that trauma-exposed people tend to follow one of four trajectories: (a) resilient, (b) worsening, (c) recovery, and (d) chronically diStressed. The complexity of the course of posttraumatic Stress limits the capacity of the ASD diagnosis to predict subsequent PTSD. Current evidence indicates that the treatment of choice for ASD is trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy, and this intervention results in reduced chronic PTSD severity. Recent attempts to limit subsequent PTSD by early provision of pharmacological interventions have been promising, especially administration of corticosterone to modulate glucocorticoid levels. Although the ASD diagnosis does not accurately predict chronic PTSD, it describes recently trauma-exposed people with severe diStress. Provision of CBT in the Acute phase is the best available strategy to limit subsequent PTSD.

  • Acute Stress disorder
    Current opinion in psychology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant
    Abstract:

    Acute Stress disorder (ASD) was introduced in DSM-IV to describe posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms that (a) occur in the initial month after trauma and (b) predict subsequent PTSD. Longitudinal studies have shown that most people who develop PTSD do not initially meet ASD criteria, which led to the decision in DSM-5 to limit the ASD diagnosis to describing Acute Stress reactions without any predictive function. Controlled trials have shown that trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy is the treatment of choice for ASD, and is superior to pharmacological interventions. Recent longitudinal studies have challenged previous conceptualizations of the course of posttraumatic Stress, and highlighted that people follow different trajectories of adaptation that are influenced by events that occur after the Acute posttraumatic period.

  • The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology – Acute Stress disorder
    Current Opinion in Psychology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant
    Abstract:

    Acute Stress disorder (ASD) was introduced in DSM-IV to describe posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms that (a) occur in the initial month after trauma and (b) predict subsequent PTSD. Longitudinal studies have shown that most people who develop PTSD do not initially meet ASD criteria, which led to the decision in DSM-5 to limit the ASD diagnosis to describing Acute Stress reactions without any predictive function. Controlled trials have shown that trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy is the treatment of choice for ASD, and is superior to pharmacological interventions. Recent longitudinal studies have challenged previous conceptualizations of the course of posttraumatic Stress, and highlighted that people follow different trajectories of adaptation that are influenced by events that occur after the Acute posttraumatic period.

David Spiegel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Review of Acute Stress Disorder in DSM-5
    FOCUS, 2011
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant, Robert J. Ursano, David Spiegel, Matthew J. Friedman, James J. Strain
    Abstract:

    Acute Stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into DSM-IV to describe Acute Stress reactions (ASRs) that occur in the initial month after exposure to a traumatic event and before the possibility of diagnosing posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD), and to identify trauma survivors in the Acute phase who are high risk for PTSD. This review considers ASD in relation to other diagnostic approaches to Acute Stress responses, critiques the evidence of the predictive power of ASD, and discusses ASD in relation to Adjustment Disorder. The evidence suggests that ASD does not adequately identify most people who develop PTSD. This review presents a number of options and preliminary considerations to be considered for DSM-5. It is proposed that ASD be limited to describing severe ASRs (that are not necessarily precursors of PTSD). The evidence suggests that the current emphasis on dissociation may be overly restrictive and does not recognize the heterogeneity of early posttraumatic Stress responses. It is proposed that A…

  • A review of Acute Stress disorder in DSM-5.
    Depression and Anxiety, 2010
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant, Robert J. Ursano, David Spiegel, Matthew J. Friedman, James J. Strain
    Abstract:

    Acute Stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into DSM-IV to describe Acute Stress reactions (ASRs) that occur in the initial month after exposure to a traumatic event and before the possibility of diagnosing posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD), and to identify trauma survivors in the Acute phase who are high risk for PTSD. This review considers ASD in relation to other diagnostic approaches to Acute Stress responses, critiques the evidence of the predictive power of ASD, and discusses ASD in relation to Adjustment Disorder. The evidence suggests that ASD does not adequately identify most people who develop PTSD. This review presents a number of options and preliminary considerations to be considered for DSM-5. It is proposed that ASD be limited to describing severe ASRs (that are not necessarily precursors of PTSD). The evidence suggests that the current emphasis on dissociation may be overly restrictive and does not recognize the heterogeneity of early posttraumatic Stress responses. It is proposed that ASD may be better conceptualized as the severity of Acute Stress responses that does not require specific clusters to be present.

  • Acute Stress reactions following the assassination of Mexican presidential candidate Colosio
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2002
    Co-Authors: José R. Maldonado, Cheryl Koopman, Kathy Page, Lisa D. Butler, Heather Stein, David Spiegel
    Abstract:

    Considerable evidence suggests that exposure to traumatic events increases the risk of developing anxiety-spectrum disorders in response to later traumatization. We conducted a survey in Guadalajara, Mexico to assess factors associated with Acute Stress reactions to the assassination of a political figure. Participants included 86 adults who completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire (SASRQ) and measures of the perceived impact of the assassination, exhibited emotional behavior following the assassination, and had exposure to a specific prior disaster (a gas pipeline explosion). The results suggest that Acute Stress reactions can occur in response to an assassination, and that those most susceptible are those most emotionally invested, those who engage in emotional behavioral responses, and those whose lives have been affected by a previous potentially traumatic event.

Cheryl Koopman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acute Stress reactions following the assassination of Mexican presidential candidate Colosio
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2002
    Co-Authors: José R. Maldonado, Cheryl Koopman, Kathy Page, Lisa D. Butler, Heather Stein, David Spiegel
    Abstract:

    Considerable evidence suggests that exposure to traumatic events increases the risk of developing anxiety-spectrum disorders in response to later traumatization. We conducted a survey in Guadalajara, Mexico to assess factors associated with Acute Stress reactions to the assassination of a political figure. Participants included 86 adults who completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire (SASRQ) and measures of the perceived impact of the assassination, exhibited emotional behavior following the assassination, and had exposure to a specific prior disaster (a gas pipeline explosion). The results suggest that Acute Stress reactions can occur in response to an assassination, and that those most susceptible are those most emotionally invested, those who engage in emotional behavioral responses, and those whose lives have been affected by a previous potentially traumatic event.

  • Psychometric properties of the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire (SASRQ): A valid and reliable measure of Acute Stress
    Journal of traumatic stress, 2000
    Co-Authors: Etzel Cardeña, Catherine C. Classen, Cheryl Koopman, Lynn C. Waelde, David Spiegel
    Abstract:

    A reliable and valid measure is needed for assessing the psychological symptoms experienced in the aftermath of a traumatic event. Previous research suggests that trauma victims typically experience dissociative, anxiety and other symptoms, during or shortly after a traumatic event. Although some of these symptoms may protect the trauma victim from pain, they may also lead to Acute Stress, posttraumatic Stress, or other disorders. The Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire (SASRQ) was developed to evaluate anxiety and dissociation symptoms in the aftermath of traumatic events, following DSM-IV criteria for Acute Stress disorder. We present data from multiple datasets and analyses supporting the reliability and construct, convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity of the SASRQ.

  • A review of Acute Stress reactions among victims of violence
    Aggression and Violent Behavior, 1999
    Co-Authors: Cheryl Gore-felton, Cheryl Koopman, Michele Gill, David Spiegel
    Abstract:

    This article reviews research pertaining to the psychological trauma occurring in the immediate aftermath of interpersonal violence. The literature surveyed includes studies of victims and observers of various forms of interpersonal violence: rape, threats by a patient, legal execution, terrorist attack, ambush, and assassination, mass shootings, and other forms of homicide. The empirical evidence indicates that individuals commonly experience disruptive psychological symptoms immediately following violence. Further, there is evidence that Acute Stress reactions can lead to posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). The limited amount of research conducted on treatment interventions on Acute Stress reactions to violence indicates that there is not one best intervention. However, the high prevalence of Acute Stress reactions among victims immediately following interpersonal violence, coupled with evidence that Acute Stress symptoms predict PTSD, underscore the importance of providing early intervention to victims of interpersonal violence.

Anthony G. Phillips – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acute Stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning
    Behavioural brain research, 2013
    Co-Authors: K.a. Butts, Stan B. Floresco, Anthony G. Phillips
    Abstract:

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of Acute Stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to Acute Stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch Stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to Acute Stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an Acute Stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of Acute Stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy.

  • hippocampal long term depression mediates Acute Stress induced spatial memory retrieval impairment
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2007
    Co-Authors: Tak Pan Wong, Anthony G. Phillips, John G Howland, Julie M Robillard, Andrea K Titterness, Karen Brebner, Lidong Liu, Joanne Weinberg, Brian R Christie, Yu Tian Wang
    Abstract:

    Acute Stress impairs memory retrieval and facilitates the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampal CA1 region of the adult rodent brain. However, whether such alterations in synaptic plasticity cause the behavioral effects of Stress is not known. Here, we report that two selective inhibitors of the induction or expression of Stress-enabled, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent hippocampal LTD also block spatial memomemory retrieval impairments caused by Acute Stress. Additionally, we demonstrate that facilitating the induction of hippocampal LTD in vivo by blockade of glutamate transport mimics the behavioral effects of Acute Stress by impairing spatial memomemory retrieval. Thus, the present study demonstrates that hippocampal LTD is both necessary and sufficient to cause Acute Stress-induced impairment of spatial memomemory retrieval and provides a new perspective from which to consider the nature of cognitive deficits in disorders whose symptoms are aggravated by Stress.

Rachel M. Guthrie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Treating Acute Stress Disorder Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
    American Journal of Psychiatry, 2003
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant, Michelle L. Moulds, Rachel M. Guthrie, Reginald D. V. Nixon
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: Acute Stress disorder permits early identification of trauma survivors who are at risk of developing chronic posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to prevent PTSD in people who developed Acute Stress disorder after a mild brain injury by early provision of cognitive behavior therapy. METHOD: Twenty-four civilian trauma survivors with Acute Stress disorder were given five individually administered sessions of either cognitive behavior therapy or supportive counseling within 2 weeks of their trauma. RESULTS: Fewer patients receiving cognitive behavior therapy than supportive counseling met criteria for PTSD at a posttreatment evaluation (8% versus 58%, respectively). There were also fewer cases of PTSD at a 6-month follow-up evaluation among those receiving cognitive behavior therapy (17%) than among those receiving supportive counseling (58%). Patients in the cognitive behavior therapy condition displayed less reexperiencing and avoidance symptoms at the follow-up evaluation tha…

  • Hypnotizability in Acute Stress Disorder
    American Journal of Psychiatry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant, Rachel M. Guthrie, Michelle L. Moulds
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the relationship between Acute dissociative reactions to trauma and hypnotizability. METHOD: Acutely traumatized patients (N=61) with Acute Stress disorder, subclinical Acute Stress disorder (no dissociative symptoms), and no Acute Stress disorder were administered the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale within 4 weeks of their trauma. RESULTS: Although patients with Acute Stress disorder and patients with subclinical Acute Stress disorder displayed comparable levels of nondissociative psychopathology, Acute Stress disorder patients had higher levels of hypnotizability and were more likely to display reversible posthypnotic amnesia than both patients with subclinical Acute Stress disorder and patients with no Acute Stress disorder. CONCLUSIONS: The findings may be interpreted in light of a diathesis-Stress process mediating trauma-related dissociation. People who develop Acute Stress disorder in response to traumatic experience may have a stronger ability to experience diss…

  • Acute Stress Disorder Scale : A self-report measure of Acute Stress disorder
    Psychological Assessment, 2000
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Bryant, Michelle L. Moulds, Rachel M. Guthrie
    Abstract:

    The Acute Stress Disorder Scale (ASDS) is a self-reporeport inventory that (a) indexes Acute Stress disorder (ASD) and (b) predicts posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). The ASDS is a 19-item inventory that is based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria. The ASDS possessed good sensitivity (95%) and specificity (83%) for identifying ASD against the ASD Interview on 99 civilian trauma survivors. Test-retest reliability of the ASDS scores between 2 and 7 days was strong (r = .94). The ASDS predicted 91% of bushfire survivors who developed PTSD and 93% of those who did not; one third of those identified by the ASDS as being at risk did not develop PTSD, however. The ASDS shows promise as a screening instrument to identify Acutely traumatized individuals who warrant more thorough assessment for risk of PTSD.