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Adaptogenic

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2349 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Rajesh Kumar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a dose dependent Adaptogenic and safety evaluation of rhodiola imbricata edgew a high altitude rhizome
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Vanita Gupta, Shalini Saggu, R C Sawhney, Rajkumar Tulsawani, Rajesh Kumar

    Abstract:

    Abstract To examine the dose dependent Adaptogenic activity aqueous extract of Rhodiola imbricata root was orally administered in rats at different doses, 30 min prior to cold (5 °C)–hypoxia (428 mm Hg)–restraint (C–H–R) exposure. The maximal effective Adaptogenic dose of the extract was 100 mg/kg body weight. The acute and sub-acute toxicity of the extract was also studied in rats. Sub-acute toxicity studies included administration of single oral dose of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg of extract once daily for 14 days and maximal effective single oral dose of 100 mg/kg once daily for 30 days. At the end of each treatment period the biochemical parameters related to liver function, kidney function, lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol) and hematological parameters were estimated in serum and blood. Biochemical and hematological analysis showed no significant changes in any of the parameters examined in treated group’s animal, in comparison to control animals. No significant change was observed in organ weight/body weight ratios, of any organ studied in comparison to control rats. The oral LD 50 of the extract was observed to be >10 g/kg, indicating an adequate margin of safety. No histopathological changes were observed in the vital organs studied of the treated animals. These results suggest that aqueous extract of R. imbricata root possess potent Adaptogenic activity with no acute and sub-acute toxicity.

  • Adaptogenic and safety evaluation of seabuckthorn hippophae rhamnoides leaf extract a dose dependent study
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Shalini Saggu, H M Divekar, Vanita Gupta, R C Sawhney, P K Banerjee, Rajesh Kumar

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., Elaeagnaceae), leaf aqueous extract were examined in rats for its Adaptogenic activity and toxicity. Dose dependent Adaptogenic study of extract was carried out at different doses administered orally, 30 min prior to cold (5 °C)–hypoxia (428 mmHg)–restraint (C–H–R) exposure. After sub-acute toxicity studies on 10 and 20 times doses of maximal effective dose administered for 14 days (single oral dose of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg once daily) and maximal effective dose administered for 30 days (single oral dose of 100 mg/kg once daily), biochemical and hematological parameters were studied in the serum and blood. The maximal effective Adaptogenic dose of the extract was 100 mg/kg body weight. No significant changes were observed in organ weight/body weight ratios, of any vital organ studied (except liver and kidney in 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight doses, respectively), and biochemical and hematological parameters of the sub-acute drug treated animals in comparison to control rats. In acute toxicity study LD50 of the extract was observed to be >10 g/kg when given orally. These results indicate that seabuckthorn leaf aqueous extract possess potent Adaptogenic activity with no toxicity even after sub-acute (30 days) maximal effective dose administration.

Vanita Gupta – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a dose dependent Adaptogenic and safety evaluation of rhodiola imbricata edgew a high altitude rhizome
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Vanita Gupta, Shalini Saggu, R C Sawhney, Rajkumar Tulsawani, Rajesh Kumar

    Abstract:

    Abstract To examine the dose dependent Adaptogenic activity aqueous extract of Rhodiola imbricata root was orally administered in rats at different doses, 30 min prior to cold (5 °C)–hypoxia (428 mm Hg)–restraint (C–H–R) exposure. The maximal effective Adaptogenic dose of the extract was 100 mg/kg body weight. The acute and sub-acute toxicity of the extract was also studied in rats. Sub-acute toxicity studies included administration of single oral dose of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg of extract once daily for 14 days and maximal effective single oral dose of 100 mg/kg once daily for 30 days. At the end of each treatment period the biochemical parameters related to liver function, kidney function, lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol) and hematological parameters were estimated in serum and blood. Biochemical and hematological analysis showed no significant changes in any of the parameters examined in treated group’s animal, in comparison to control animals. No significant change was observed in organ weight/body weight ratios, of any organ studied in comparison to control rats. The oral LD 50 of the extract was observed to be >10 g/kg, indicating an adequate margin of safety. No histopathological changes were observed in the vital organs studied of the treated animals. These results suggest that aqueous extract of R. imbricata root possess potent Adaptogenic activity with no acute and sub-acute toxicity.

  • Adaptogenic and safety evaluation of seabuckthorn hippophae rhamnoides leaf extract a dose dependent study
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Shalini Saggu, H M Divekar, Vanita Gupta, R C Sawhney, P K Banerjee, Rajesh Kumar

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effects of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., Elaeagnaceae), leaf aqueous extract were examined in rats for its Adaptogenic activity and toxicity. Dose dependent Adaptogenic study of extract was carried out at different doses administered orally, 30 min prior to cold (5 °C)–hypoxia (428 mmHg)–restraint (C–H–R) exposure. After sub-acute toxicity studies on 10 and 20 times doses of maximal effective dose administered for 14 days (single oral dose of 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg once daily) and maximal effective dose administered for 30 days (single oral dose of 100 mg/kg once daily), biochemical and hematological parameters were studied in the serum and blood. The maximal effective Adaptogenic dose of the extract was 100 mg/kg body weight. No significant changes were observed in organ weight/body weight ratios, of any vital organ studied (except liver and kidney in 1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight doses, respectively), and biochemical and hematological parameters of the sub-acute drug treated animals in comparison to control rats. In acute toxicity study LD50 of the extract was observed to be >10 g/kg when given orally. These results indicate that seabuckthorn leaf aqueous extract possess potent Adaptogenic activity with no toxicity even after sub-acute (30 days) maximal effective dose administration.

  • anti stress and Adaptogenic activity of l arginine supplementation
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2005
    Co-Authors: Vanita Gupta, H M Divekar, Shalini Saggu, Asheesh Gupta, S K Grover, Ratan Kumar

    Abstract:

    In the present study, oral supplementation of l-arginine in rats was evaluated for its anti-stress and Adaptogenic activity using the cold (5°C)–hypoxia (428 mmHg)–restraint (C-H-R) animal model. A dose-dependent study of l-arginine was carried out at doses of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200.0 and 500.0 mg/kg body weight, administered orally 30 min prior to C-H-R exposure. The time taken by the rat to attain a rectal temperature of 23°C (Trec 23°C) during C-H-R exposure and its recovery to Trec 37°C at normal atmospheric pressure and 32 ± 1°C were used as biomarkers of anti-stress and Adaptogenic activity. Biochemical parameters related to lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidants, cell membrane permeability, nitric oxide and stress, with and without administration of the least effective l-arginine dose, were measured in rats on attaining Trec 23°C and Trec 37°C. The least effective Adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight. The C-H-R exposure of control rats, on attaining Trec 23°C, resulted in a significant increase in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), blood lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a decrease in blood catalase (CAT) and plasma testosterone levels. On recovery (Trec 37°C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to Trec 37°C. The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia.

Milen I. Georgiev – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rhodiola rosea L.: from golden root to green cell factories
    Phytochemistry Reviews, 2016
    Co-Authors: Andrey S. Marchev, Albena T. Dinkova-kostova, Zsuzsanna György, Iman Mirmazloum, Ina Y. Aneva, Milen I. Georgiev

    Abstract:

    Rhodiola rosea L. is a worldwide popular plant with Adaptogenic activities that have been and currently are exploited in the traditional medicine of many countries, as well as, examined in a number of clinical trials. More than 140 chemical structures have been identified which belong to several natural product classes, including phenylpropanoid glycosides, phenylethanoids, flavonoids and essential oils, and are mainly stored in the rhizomes and the roots of the plant. A number of mechanisms contribute to the Adaptogenic activities of R. rosea preparations and its phytochemical constituents. Among them, the intrinsic inducible mammalian stress responses and their effector proteins, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), are the most prominent. Due to its popular medicinal use, which has led to depletion of its natural habitats, R. rosea is now considered as endangered in most parts of the world. Conservation, cultivation and micropropagation are all implemented as potential preservation strategies. A number of in vitro systems of R. rosea are being developed as sources of pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. These are greatly facilitated by advances in elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways and the enzymes, which catalyse the production of these secondary metabolites in the plant. In addition, biotechnological approaches show promise towards achieving sustainable production of R. rosea secondary metabolites.