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Adiantum Capillus-Veneris

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Masamitsu Wada – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fern Adiantum Capillus-Veneris phytochrome 1 comprises two native photochemical types similar to seed plant phytochrome A.
    Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: V.a. Sineshchekov, Haruko Okamoto, L. Koppel, Masamitsu Wada

    Abstract:

    Abstract Phytochrome (phy) in etiolated seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis (Ler) and its transgenic lines (TL) L15 and L20 transformed with Adiantum Capillus-Veneris PHY1 cDNA (Okamoto et al., 1997) was investigated using low-temperature (85 K) fluorescence spectroscopy and photochemistry. It was found that while WT seed germination requires stimulation by light, the TL germinated equally well with or without pre-illumination. Phytochrome content [Ptot] was 2-fold higher in TL whereas the level of Pr → lumi-R phototransformation at 85 K (γ1) was similar between WT (0.25) and TL (0.27). When seeds germinated with pre-illumination, the proportion of the photochemical types Pr′ active and Pr″ inactive at 85 K was 50/50 in WT and 54/46 in TL, respectively. Dark-germinated TL had a γ1 value of 0.16 and the proportion of Pr′ and Pr″ was 32/68, respectively, without changes in [Ptot]. Evaluations based on these data revealed that phy1 has Pr′ and Pr″, designated phy1′ and phy1″, akin to phyA, which comprises both Pr photochemical types (phyA′ and phyA″), and in contrast to phyB that possesses only Pr″. The proportion of phy1′ and phy1″ depends on pre-illumination for induction of germination. The pigment most likely accumulated in the seeds and was active in promoting Arabidopsis seed germination.

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  • distribution pattern changes of actin filaments during chloroplast movement in Adiantum capillus veneris
    Journal of Plant Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hidenori Tsuboi, Masamitsu Wada

    Abstract:

    Chloroplasts change their positions in a cell in response to light intensities. The photoreceptors involved in chloroplast photo-relocation movements and the behavior of chloroplasts during their migration were identified in our previous studies, but the mechanism of movement has yet to be clarified. In this study, the behavior of actin filaments under various light conditions was observed in Adiantum Capillus-Veneris gametophytes. In chloroplasts staying in one place under a weak light condition and not moving, circular structures composed of actin filaments were observed around the chloroplast periphery. In contrast, short actin filaments were observed at the leading edge of moving chloroplasts induced by partial cell irradiation. In the dark, the circular structures found under the weak light condition disappeared and then reappeared around the moving chloroplasts. Mutant analyses revealed that the disappearance of the circular actin structure was mediated by the blue light photoreceptor, phototropin2.

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  • red light induced phytochrome relocation into the nucleus in Adiantum capillus veneris
    Molecular Plant, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hidenori Tsuboi, Sachihiko Nakamura, Eberhard Schafer, Masamitsu Wada

    Abstract:

    Phytochromes in seed plants are known to move into nuclei in a red light-dependent manner with or without interacting factors. Here, we show phytochrome relocation to the nuclear region in phytochrome-dependent Adiantum Capillus-Veneris spore germination by partial spore-irradiation experiments. The nuclear or non-nuclear region of imbibed spores was irradiated with a microbeam of red and/or far-red light and the localization of phytochrome involved in spore germination was estimated from the germination rate. The phytochrome for spore germination existed throughout whole spore under darkness after imbibition, but gradually migrated to the nuclear region following red light irradiation. Intracellular distribution of PHY–GUS fusion proteins expressed in germinated spores by particle bombardment showed the migration of Ac phy2, but not Ac phy1, into nucleus in a red light-dependent manner, suggesting that Ac phy2 is the photoreceptor for fern spore germination.

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Guang-yuan Rao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sugar Treatments Can Induce AcLEAFY COTYLEDON1 Expression and Trigger the Accumulation of Storage Products during Prothallus Development of Adiantum Capillus-Veneris.
    Frontiers in Plant Science, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yu-han Fang, Shu-nong Bai, Guang-yuan Rao

    Abstract:

    A seed is an intricate structure. Of the two development processes involved in seed formation, seed maturation or seed program includes accumulation of storage products, acquisition of desiccation tolerance, and induction of dormancy. Little is known about how these processes were originated and integrated into the life cycle of seed plants. While previous investigation on seed origin was almost exclusively through fossil comparison in paleobotany, a wealth of information about the key role of LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) in seed formation of spermatophyte inspired a new approach to investigating the seed origin mystery. Here we examined the expression pattern of AcLEC1 during the entire life cycle of Adiantum Capillus-Veneris, a non-seed plant, confirmed no AcLEC1 gene expression detectable in prothalli, demonstrated inductive expressed by both sucrose and glucose in prothalli. As expected, we found that sugar treatments delayed prothallus development, promoted differentiation of reproductive organs, and triggered accumulation of storage products. These findings demonstrated links between the sugar treatments and the induction of AcLEC1 expression, as well as the sugar treatments and the events such as accumulation of storage products, which is similar to those considered as seed maturation process in seed plants. These links support a modified hypothesis that inductive expression of LEC1 homologs during embryogenesis might be a key innovation for the origin of the seed program.

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  • Isolation and Characterization of a Novel SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE Gene Expressed in the Fern Adiantum capillus – veneris During Shoot Regeneration In Vitro
    Plant Molecular Biology Reporter, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yu-han Fang, Shu-nong Bai, Jing-dan Han, Guang-yuan Rao

    Abstract:

    SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE (SERK) genes are expressed primarily in seed plants and are involved in the development of embryos from already-differentiated plant cells. This study provides the first evidence for the existence of a SERK gene, designated AcvSERK1, in a fern, Adiantum Capillus-Veneris. AcvSERK1 belongs to a small family of receptor-like kinases (RLKs), and its sequence and conserved structure closely resemble SERK homologs in other land plants. Phylogenetic analysis of the SERK gene family showed that AcvSERK1 forms a clade with SERK-like genes from non-seed plants and is a member of the SERK1/2 genes group, involved in somatic embryogenesis. Moreover, our analyses reveal that AcvSERK1 is expressed throughout the entire process of embryo development, but its levels decrease with the formation of shoots and seedlings. Additionally, in situ hybridization showed that AcvSERK1 is expressed during green globular body (GGB)-derived somatic embryogenesis and in meristematic calluses. Our results indicate that the AcvSERK1 gene is a good marker for differentiated cells that are capable of forming embryos in A. Capillus-Veneris, suggesting that SERK genes have played an important role in embryogenesis during the evolution of land plants.

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  • Overview of the morphology, anatomy, and ontogeny of Adiantum Capillus-Veneris: An experimental system to study the development of ferns
    Journal of Systematics and Evolution, 2013
    Co-Authors: Yu-han Fang, Ji Yang, Shu-nong Bai, Guang-yuan Rao

    Abstract:

    Adiantum Capillus-Veneris L., commonly regarded as a good experimental plant for the study of fern development, is investigated, and its life cycle under laboratory conditions is described. In our study, the life cycle of A. Capillus-Veneris was completed in 100 days. Features of spore germination, antheridium and archegonium ontogeny and development, and embryogenesis are investigated. Exosporic gametophytes of A. Capillus-Veneris came from spores, and ended with the cordate prothallia. Antheridia and archegonia were generally situated toward the posterior end and the notch of the prothallia, respectively. Sporophyte was also studied with emphasis on leaf morphology and the vascular system. There were vascular bundles of dictyostele without secondary vascular tissues. Sporogenesis was scrutinized from sporangial initial of a single surface cell to the annulus shedding spores explosively. Our findings provide insight into the life cycle of the leptosporangiate ferns under experimental conditions, and make it possible for A. Capillus-Veneris to be an underlying model plant for the study of evolutionary and developmental biology.

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Homa Hajimehdipoor – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • medicinal properties of Adiantum capillus veneris linn in traditional medicine and modern phytotherapy a review article
    Iranian Journal of Public Health, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sahar Dehdari, Homa Hajimehdipoor

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Adiantum Capillus-Veneris Linn (Maidenhair fern) is an herb belonging to the family Pteridaceae. It is named as “ Pare-siavashan ” in medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of Iranian Traditional Medicine. The fronds of Maidenhair fern were mainly administrated by ancient physicians as single medicine or in combination with other plants in multi-herbal formulations for curing different diseases. Because of different chemical compositions, the herb fronds were also assessed for its numerous pharmacological effects. Therefore, the current study was done to review the traditional usage and modern pharmacological and toxicological effects of Maidenhair fern. Methods: Scientific databases and publications including Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Science direct, Cochrane Library, SID (for Persian papers) and medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of traditional medicine as well were searched for “ Adiantum Capillus-Veneris ”, “ Maidenhair fern ” and “ Pare-siavashan ” without limitation up to 2016. Results: Maidenhair fern exhibited to possess anti-diabetic, anticonvulsant, analgesic, hypocholesterolemic, goitrogenic, anti-thyroidal, antibacterial, antifungal, wound healing, antiobesity, anti hair loss, anti-asthmatic, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and antispasmodic, antioxidant as well as diuretic, anti-urolithiatic and detoxifying effects in modern medicine. Ancient physicians declared some of the confirmed pharmacological effects. Conclusion: Maidenhair fern frond can be a good candidate for clinical purpose. Therefore, future researches on the other mentioned effects in traditional medicine are recommended.

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  • Adiantum Capillus-Veneris Linn. (Maidenhair fern) in modern phytotherapy
    Research Journal of Pharmacognosy, 2017
    Co-Authors: Sahar Dehdari, Homa Hajimehdipoor

    Abstract:

    Background and objectives: Maidenhair fern is an herbal medicine belonging to the family Pteridaceae which is extensively found in Atlantic coast as far as Ireland, America and Iran. The fronds of Adiantum Capillus-Veneris are prescribed for treatment of different diseases. Different phytochemical compositions such as flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins, terpenoids, etc. have been found in this species. Due to the various phyto-compositions, the plant has been investigated for its pharmacological properties. Methods: Databases were searched for “Adiantum Capillus-Veneris”, “Maidenhair fern” without limitation up to 2016. Data on the herb were collected via electronic databases including Web of science, PubMed, Scopus, SID (for Persian papers), Science direct and Cochrane Library. Results: Maidenhair fern revealed to possess numerous pharmacological effects such as anti-diabetic, analgesic, hypocholesterolemic, goitrogenic, anti-thyroidal, antibacterial effects, etc. in modern medicine. Conclusion: Maidenhair fern grows in many places. Because of different phytoconstituents of the species, many pharmacological effects are ascribed to the plant. So, the herb can be a good choice for clinical studies.

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