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Mark D Regnerus – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • parental same sex relationships family instability and subsequent life outcomes for Adult Children answering critics of the new family structures study with additional analyses
    Social Science Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Mark D Regnerus

    Abstract:

    The July 2012 publication of my study on the outcomes of young Adults who report parental same-sex relationship behavior raised a variety of questions about the New Family Structures Study and my analyses and interpretations of it. This follow-up article seeks to address a variety of the more common criticisms that have been raised, to offer new commentary and analyses, and to pose questions for future analysts of the NFSS and other datasets that are poised to consider how household dynamics are associated with youth and young-Adult outcomes. The new analyses I present here still reveal numerous differences between Adult Children who report maternal same-sex behavior (and residence with her partner) and those with still-married (heterosexual) biological parents. Far fewer differences appear between the former and several other groups, most notably never-married single mothers.

  • how different are the Adult Children of parents who have same sex relationships findings from the new family structures study
    Social Science Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Mark D Regnerus

    Abstract:

    The New Family Structures Study (NFSS) is a social-science data-collection project that fielded a survey to a large, random sample of American young Adults (ages 18–39) who were raised in different types of family arrangements. In this debut article of the NFSS, I compare how the young-Adult Children of a parent who has had a same-sex romantic relationship fare on 40 different social, emotional, and relational outcome variables when compared with six other family-of-origin types. The results reveal numerous, consistent differences, especially between the Children of women who have had a lesbian relationship and those with still-married (heterosexual) biological parents. The results are typically robust in multivariate contexts as well, suggesting far greater diversity in lesbian-parent household experiences than convenience-sample studies of lesbian families have revealed. The NFSS proves to be an illuminating, versatile dataset that can assist family scholars in understanding the long reach of family structure and transitions.

John Giles – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • can china s rural elderly count on support from Adult Children implications of rural to urban migration
    Journal of Population Ageing, 2010
    Co-Authors: John Giles, Dewen Wang, Changbao Zhao

    Abstract:

    This paper shows that support from the family continues to be an important source of support for the rural elderly, particularly the rural elderly over 70 years of age. Decline in likelihood of co-residence with, or in close proximity to, Adult Children raises the possibility that China’s rural elderly will receive less support in the forms of both income and in-kind instrumental care. Although descriptive evidence on net financial transfers suggests that the elderly with migrant Children will receive similar levels of financial transfers as those without migrant Children, the predicted variance associated with these transfers implies a higher risk that elderly with migrant Children may fall into poverty. Reducing the risk of low incomes among the elderly is one important motive for new rural pension initiatives supported by China’s government, which are scheduled to be expanded to cover all rural counties by the end of the 12th Five Year Plan in 2016.

  • elderly parent health and the migration decisions of Adult Children evidence from rural china
    Demography, 2007
    Co-Authors: John Giles

    Abstract:

    Recent research has shown that participation in migrant labor markets has led to substantial increases in income for families in rural China. This article addresses the question of how participation is affected by elderly parent health. We find that younger Adults are less likely to work as migrants when a parent is ill. Poor health of an elderly parent has less impact on the probability of employment as a migrant when an Adult child has siblings who may be available to provide care. We also highlight the potential importance of including information on nonresident family members when studying how parent illness and elder care requirements influence the labor supply decisions of Adult Children.

Silvia Sorensen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spouses Adult Children and Children in law as caregivers of older Adults a meta analytic comparison
    Psychology and Aging, 2011
    Co-Authors: Martin Pinquart, Silvia Sorensen

    Abstract:

    The present meta-analysis integrates the results from 168 empirical studies on differences between caregiving spouses, Adult Children, and Children-in-law. Spouses differ from Children and Children-in-law significantly with regard to sociodemographic variables; also, they provide more support but report fewer care recipient behavior problems. Spouse caregivers report more depression symptoms, greater financial and physical burden, and lower levels of psychological well-being. Higher levels of psychological distress among spouses are explained mostly—but not completely—by higher levels of care provision. Few differences emerge between Children and Children-in-law, but Children-in-law perceive the relationship with the care recipient as less positive and they report fewer uplifts of caregiving.

  • influences of socioeconomic status social network and competence on subjective well being in later life a meta analysis
    Psychology and Aging, 2000
    Co-Authors: Martin Pinquart, Silvia Sorensen

    Abstract:

    Meta-analysis is used to synthesize findings from 286 empirical studies on the association of socioeconomic status (SES), social network, and competence with subjective well-being (SWB) in the elderly. All three aspects of life circumstances are positively associated with SWB. Income is correlated more strongly with well-being than is education. The quality of social contacts shows stronger associations with SWB than does the quantity of social contacts. Whereas having contact with friends is more strongly related to SWB than having contact with Adult Children, there are higher associations between life satisfaction and quality of contact with Adult Children when compared with quality of friendships. Moderating influences of gender and age on the effects of SES, social network, and competence on SWB are also investigated.