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Stephen L Dobson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the impact of insecticide treated cloth targets on the survival of stegomyia polynesiensis Aedes polynesiensis under laboratory and semi field conditions in french polynesia
    Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Scott A Ritchie, Richard C. Russell, Eric W. Chambers, Hervé Bossin, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    The impact of deltamethrin-impregnated cloth targets on Stegomyia polynesiensis (= Aedes polynesiensis) (Marks) (Diptera: Culicidae) was assessed under laboratory and semi-field settings in French Polynesia. Stegomyia polynesiensis females were released into small laboratory cages and large field cages containing either a deltamethrin-treated or an untreated navy blue cloth, and mosquito knock-down and mortality were assessed. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the insecticide-treated target in small cages was 98.0%. These mosquitoes also demonstrated significantly higher levels of knock-down than those exposed to the untreated target. Mortality in field cages was assessed at 24 and 48 h. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the control target was 31.2%, whereas that in those exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target was 54.3%. The 48-h mortality rate was also elevated in mosquitoes exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target, but this result did not differ significantly from that observed in mosquitoes exposed to the control target. The significant suppression of female S. polynesiensis by deltamethrin-treated resting targets in this study indicates that these targets could play a role in the control of an important disease vector in the South Pacific region.

  • The impact of insecticide-treated cloth targets on the survival of Stegomyia polynesiensis (= Aedes polynesiensis) under laboratory and semi-field conditions in French Polynesia.
    Medical and veterinary entomology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Eric W. Chambers, Scott A Ritchie, Richard C. Russell, Herve C Bossin, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    The impact of deltamethrin-impregnated cloth targets on Stegomyia polynesiensis (= Aedes polynesiensis) (Marks) (Diptera: Culicidae) was assessed under laboratory and semi-field settings in French Polynesia. Stegomyia polynesiensis females were released into small laboratory cages and large field cages containing either a deltamethrin-treated or an untreated navy blue cloth, and mosquito knock-down and mortality were assessed. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the insecticide-treated target in small cages was 98.0%. These mosquitoes also demonstrated significantly higher levels of knock-down than those exposed to the untreated target. Mortality in field cages was assessed at 24 and 48 h. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the control target was 31.2%, whereas that in those exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target was 54.3%. The 48-h mortality rate was also elevated in mosquitoes exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target, but this result did not differ significantly from that observed in mosquitoes exposed to the control target. The significant suppression of female S. polynesiensis by deltamethrin-treated resting targets in this study indicates that these targets could play a role in the control of an important disease vector in the South Pacific region.

  • Swarming Behavior of Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) and Characterization of Swarm Markers in American Samoa
    Journal of medical entomology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Holly C. Tuten, Chris M. Stone, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    We characterize the swarming behavior of male Aedes polynesiensis (Marks) in American Samoa. Instead of swarming around a blood host, males used the base of certain trees as a marker. Repeated sampling proved nondestructive and allowed us to investigate the impact of static (e.g., tree species) and dynamic (e.g., barometric pressure) characters on the likelihood of swarm presence and intensity. Tree circumference and oviposition activity (number of Ae. polynesiensis reared from oviposition cups) were significant positive predictors of the number of males in a swarm. Tree circumference and diameter were significantly positively associated, and canopy height was significantly negatively associated, with swarm occurrence. Comparisons between males swarming early and late during the swarming period allowed for insight into swarm composition in terms of male size and the amount of putative fluid (e.g., nectar) in the crop, indicators of energetic reserves. Males collected during the late period had significantly larger wings and less crop contents than did males of the early cohort. Because the ecology of male Ae. polynesiensis remains understudied, we consider how the current results could facilitate further studies related to applied autocidal strategies as well as the evolution of host-based mating behavior.

Frederic Lardeux – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluation of insecticide impregnated baits for control of mosquito larvae in land crab burrows on French Polynesian atolls.
    Journal of medical entomology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Yves Sechan, Marc Faaruia
    Abstract:

    Land crab burrows are larval mosquito habitats of major significance in the Pacific region. They are constituted by a sinuous tunnel leading to a chamber in contact with the water table, where mosquito larvae proliferate. Controlling larvae in these sites is difficult, because the configuration of burrows prevents the use of standard techniques. An experiment was carried out in French Polynesia to control Aedes polynesiensis Marks and Culex spp. breeding in burrows of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex (Herbst). The technique was based on the crab’s behavior, which involves the crab carrying food into its burrow. It was shown that appetizing baits impregnated with an insecticide were carried by crabs into the flooded chamber of their burrows. A field treatment of burrows was carried out by sowing insecticide impregnated baits on the ground. The treatment coverage was almost perfect and the easy implementation of the technique enabled large areas to be treated in a short time. The bait was developed by compacting various flours, which easily incorporate a large variety of insecticide formulations. Although the baits can be easily stocked, a reliable insecticide is still to be found. The results indicate that our technique could be a method of choice for treating crab burrows.

  • age grading and growth of wuchereria bancrofti filariidea onchocercidae larvae by growth measurements and its use for estimating blood meal intervals of its polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis diptera culicidae
    International Journal for Parasitology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Jules Cheffort
    Abstract:

    Abstract Growth in length and width of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae developing in its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) was analysed using a mathematical approach to objectively extract patterns. L1 had a U-shaped growth in length, while widths followed an S-shaped function. L2 had an S-shaped growth in length and width. Growth in length of L3 was also S-shaped, while widths had an asymptotic size following a period of rapid shrinkage. The greatest difference between length and width was in stage 3 where the length was over 75 times greater than the width. The ratio of length to width was ≈50 for microfilariae and only 10 for the L1 (‘sausage’) stage. Characteristic mean length (and width) were ≈280(7) μm for microfilariae, ≈181 μm for L1 at their smallest, and ≈1584(22) μm for L3 infective larvae. There was a great increase in length during stage 2 from ≈322(27) to ≈982(31) μm. Stage duration decreased with increasing temperature while growth rate increased, giving steeper growth curves. There was no effect of temperature on size, except for L3, which were shorter when mosquitoes were reared at higher temperature. It appears that larval growth is a continuous process from microfilariae to the young L3 stage, and continuously modifies the larval parasite aspect, even within each stage. Thus, information on larval shape may be used as an age indicator and in some cases, may give an estimation on time elapsed since infection of the vector. An important demographic parameter used in most mathematical models describing transmission of parasites by insect vectors is the length of the gonotrophic cycle of the vector, i.e. the time interval between two successive blood-meals. Usual methods for computing such a parameter are based on mark-recapture techniques. However, reliable estimates need substantial capture rates, which are not always possible. This paper presents another approach in which marked mosquitoes are those naturally infected by W. bancrofti. For one mosquito, the time since infection is simply the age of the developing larval parasite. Our method first expresses the age of larval parasite as a fraction of total development time (from microfilariae entering the vector to L3 larvae) using a regression model based on measurements of the parasite‘s length and width. This fraction of development is then converted to a chronological age since infection, using a back-calculation procedure involving ambient temperatures and growth rates of W. bancrofti larvae in the vector. The method is applied to wild caught Ae. polynesiensis in French Polynesia to compute the length of the gonotrophic cycle. This mosquito species comes to bite ≈3, 6–7 and 9 days after a first infectious blood-meal. Then the length of the gonotrophic cycle may be of 3–4 days.

  • Age-grading and growth of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae by growth measurements and its use for estimating blood-meal intervals of its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae)
    International journal for parasitology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Jules Cheffort
    Abstract:

    Growth in length and width of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae developing in its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) was analysed using a mathematical approach to objectively extract patterns. L1 had a U-shaped growth in length, while widths followed an S-shaped function. L2 had an S-shaped growth in length and width. Growth in length of L3 was also S-shaped, while widths had an asymptotic size following a period of rapid shrinkage. The greatest difference between length and width was in stage 3 where the length was over 75 times greater than the width. The ratio of length to width was approximately 50 for microfilariae and only 10 for the L1 (‘sausage’) stage. Characteristic mean length (and width) were approximately 280(7) microm for microfilariae, approximately 181 microm for L1 at their smallest, and approximately 1584(22) microm for L3 infective larvae. There was a great increase in length during stage 2 from approximately 322(27) to approximately 982(31) microm. Stage duration decreased with increasing temperature while growth rate increased, giving steeper growth curves. There was no effect of temperature on size, except for L3, which were shorter when mosquitoes were reared at higher temperature. It appears that larval growth is a continuous process from microfilariae to the young L3 stage, and continuously modifies the larval parasite aspect, even within each stage. Thus, information on larval shape may be used as an age indicator and in some cases, may give an estimation on time elapsed since infection of the vector. An important demographic parameter used in most mathematical models describing transmission of parasites by insect vectors is the length of the gonotrophic cycle of the vector, i.e. the time interval between two successive blood-meals. Usual methods for computing such a parameter are based on mark-recapture techniques. However, reliable estimates need substantial capture rates, which are not always possible. This paper presents another approach in which marked mosquitoes are those naturally infected by W. bancrofti. For one mosquito, the time since infection is simply the age of the developing larval parasite. Our method first expresses the age of larval parasite as a fraction of total development time (from microfilariae entering the vector to L3 larvae) using a regression model based on measurements of the parasite‘s length and width. This fraction of development is then converted to a chronological age since infection, using a back-calculation procedure involving ambient temperatures and growth rates of W. bancrofti larvae in the vector. The method is applied to wild caught Ae. polynesiensis in French Polynesia to compute the length of the gonotrophic cycle. This mosquito species comes to bite approximately 3, 6-7 and 9 days after a first infectious blood-meal. Then the length of the gonotrophic cycle may be of 3-4 days.

Jules Cheffort – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • age grading and growth of wuchereria bancrofti filariidea onchocercidae larvae by growth measurements and its use for estimating blood meal intervals of its polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis diptera culicidae
    International Journal for Parasitology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Jules Cheffort
    Abstract:

    Abstract Growth in length and width of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae developing in its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) was analysed using a mathematical approach to objectively extract patterns. L1 had a U-shaped growth in length, while widths followed an S-shaped function. L2 had an S-shaped growth in length and width. Growth in length of L3 was also S-shaped, while widths had an asymptotic size following a period of rapid shrinkage. The greatest difference between length and width was in stage 3 where the length was over 75 times greater than the width. The ratio of length to width was ≈50 for microfilariae and only 10 for the L1 (‘sausage’) stage. Characteristic mean length (and width) were ≈280(7) μm for microfilariae, ≈181 μm for L1 at their smallest, and ≈1584(22) μm for L3 infective larvae. There was a great increase in length during stage 2 from ≈322(27) to ≈982(31) μm. Stage duration decreased with increasing temperature while growth rate increased, giving steeper growth curves. There was no effect of temperature on size, except for L3, which were shorter when mosquitoes were reared at higher temperature. It appears that larval growth is a continuous process from microfilariae to the young L3 stage, and continuously modifies the larval parasite aspect, even within each stage. Thus, information on larval shape may be used as an age indicator and in some cases, may give an estimation on time elapsed since infection of the vector. An important demographic parameter used in most mathematical models describing transmission of parasites by insect vectors is the length of the gonotrophic cycle of the vector, i.e. the time interval between two successive blood-meals. Usual methods for computing such a parameter are based on mark-recapture techniques. However, reliable estimates need substantial capture rates, which are not always possible. This paper presents another approach in which marked mosquitoes are those naturally infected by W. bancrofti. For one mosquito, the time since infection is simply the age of the developing larval parasite. Our method first expresses the age of larval parasite as a fraction of total development time (from microfilariae entering the vector to L3 larvae) using a regression model based on measurements of the parasite’s length and width. This fraction of development is then converted to a chronological age since infection, using a back-calculation procedure involving ambient temperatures and growth rates of W. bancrofti larvae in the vector. The method is applied to wild caught Ae. polynesiensis in French Polynesia to compute the length of the gonotrophic cycle. This mosquito species comes to bite ≈3, 6–7 and 9 days after a first infectious blood-meal. Then the length of the gonotrophic cycle may be of 3–4 days.

  • Age-grading and growth of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae by growth measurements and its use for estimating blood-meal intervals of its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae)
    International journal for parasitology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Jules Cheffort
    Abstract:

    Growth in length and width of Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Onchocercidae) larvae developing in its Polynesian vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) was analysed using a mathematical approach to objectively extract patterns. L1 had a U-shaped growth in length, while widths followed an S-shaped function. L2 had an S-shaped growth in length and width. Growth in length of L3 was also S-shaped, while widths had an asymptotic size following a period of rapid shrinkage. The greatest difference between length and width was in stage 3 where the length was over 75 times greater than the width. The ratio of length to width was approximately 50 for microfilariae and only 10 for the L1 (‘sausage’) stage. Characteristic mean length (and width) were approximately 280(7) microm for microfilariae, approximately 181 microm for L1 at their smallest, and approximately 1584(22) microm for L3 infective larvae. There was a great increase in length during stage 2 from approximately 322(27) to approximately 982(31) microm. Stage duration decreased with increasing temperature while growth rate increased, giving steeper growth curves. There was no effect of temperature on size, except for L3, which were shorter when mosquitoes were reared at higher temperature. It appears that larval growth is a continuous process from microfilariae to the young L3 stage, and continuously modifies the larval parasite aspect, even within each stage. Thus, information on larval shape may be used as an age indicator and in some cases, may give an estimation on time elapsed since infection of the vector. An important demographic parameter used in most mathematical models describing transmission of parasites by insect vectors is the length of the gonotrophic cycle of the vector, i.e. the time interval between two successive blood-meals. Usual methods for computing such a parameter are based on mark-recapture techniques. However, reliable estimates need substantial capture rates, which are not always possible. This paper presents another approach in which marked mosquitoes are those naturally infected by W. bancrofti. For one mosquito, the time since infection is simply the age of the developing larval parasite. Our method first expresses the age of larval parasite as a fraction of total development time (from microfilariae entering the vector to L3 larvae) using a regression model based on measurements of the parasite’s length and width. This fraction of development is then converted to a chronological age since infection, using a back-calculation procedure involving ambient temperatures and growth rates of W. bancrofti larvae in the vector. The method is applied to wild caught Ae. polynesiensis in French Polynesia to compute the length of the gonotrophic cycle. This mosquito species comes to bite approximately 3, 6-7 and 9 days after a first infectious blood-meal. Then the length of the gonotrophic cycle may be of 3-4 days.

  • Ambient temperature effects on the extrinsic incubation period of Wuchereria bancrofti in Aedes polynesiensis: implications for filariasis transmission dynamics and distribution in French Polynesia
    Medical and veterinary entomology, 2001
    Co-Authors: Frederic Lardeux, Jules Cheffort
    Abstract:

    Temperature effects on development of the human filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold) (Filaridea: Onchocercidae) in the main Pacific vector Aedes polynesiensis Marks (Diptera: Culicidae) are analysed in relation to ambient climatic conditions. A statistical model of the extrinsic cycle duration as a function of temperature is described and used to distinguish three patterns of W. bancrojii transmission dynamics: continuous, fluctuating and discontinuous, occurring from north to south geographically among French Polynesian archipelagos. In the northerly Marquesas Islands (8-1 1 S) filariasis transmission is continuous and very active, facilitated by perennially high temperatures combined with constantly high rates of man-vector contact. In the southerly Australes Islands (21-28″ S) filariasis transmission is seasonally discontinuous and, during the cooler months (May-September), the model predicts virtually no transmission because the cycle duration exceeds the life expectancy of the vector. In the Society Islands (16-18″ S), between the Marquesas and Australes, transmission is predicted to be intermediate as expected from their latitude, with seasonally fluctuating transmission potential. In the Tuamotu Islands (also geographically intermediate: 14-23′ S), with theoretically perennial transmission potential, transmission occurs only intermittently, being limited by other human and environmental factors whereby man-vector contact is confined to seasonal agricultural situations. Generally, among French Polynesian archipelagos where Aedes polyizesiensis is the vector, the transmission potential for W. bancrofi and resulting disease manifestations of lymphatic filafilariasis in humans are correlated with ambient temperature due to the degree of southern latitude.

Herve C Bossin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Specific human antibody responses to Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis saliva: A new epidemiological tool to assess human exposure to disease vectors in the Pacific.
    Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
    Co-Authors: Françoise Mathieu-daudé, Catherine Plichart, Aurore Claverie, Denis Boulanger, Fingani A Mphande, Herve C Bossin
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND:Aedes mosquitoes severely affect the health and wellbeing of human populations by transmitting infectious diseases. In French Polynesia, Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika, and Aedes polynesiensis the primary vector of Bancroftian filafilariasis and a secondary vector of arboviruses. Tools for assessing the risk of disease transmission or for measuring the efficacy of vector control programmes are scarce. A promising approach to quantify the human-vector contact relies on the detection and the quantification of antibodies directed against mosquito salivary proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:An ELISA test was developed to detect and quantify the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) directed against proteins from salivary gland extracts (SGE) of Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis in human populations exposed to either species, through a cross-sectional study. In Tahiti and Moorea islands where Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis are present, the test revealed that 98% and 68% of individuals have developed IgG directed against Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis SGE, respectively. By comparison, ELISA tests conducted on a cohort of people from metropolitan France, not exposed to these Aedes mosquitoes, indicated that 97% of individuals had no IgG directed against SGE of either mosquito species. The analysis of additional cohorts representing different entomological Aedes contexts showed no ELISA IgG cross-reactivity between Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis SGE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:The IgG response to salivary gland extracts seems to be a valid and specific biomarker of human exposure to the bites of Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis. This new immuno-epidemiological tool will enhance our understanding of people exposure to mosquito bites, facilitate the identification of areas where disease transmission risk is high and permit to evaluate the efficacy of novel vector control strategies in Pacific islands and other tropical settings

  • The impact of insecticide-treated cloth targets on the survival of Stegomyia polynesiensis (= Aedes polynesiensis) under laboratory and semi-field conditions in French Polynesia.
    Medical and veterinary entomology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Eric W. Chambers, Scott A Ritchie, Richard C. Russell, Herve C Bossin, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    The impact of deltamethrin-impregnated cloth targets on Stegomyia polynesiensis (= Aedes polynesiensis) (Marks) (Diptera: Culicidae) was assessed under laboratory and semi-field settings in French Polynesia. Stegomyia polynesiensis females were released into small laboratory cages and large field cages containing either a deltamethrin-treated or an untreated navy blue cloth, and mosquito knock-down and mortality were assessed. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the insecticide-treated target in small cages was 98.0%. These mosquitoes also demonstrated significantly higher levels of knock-down than those exposed to the untreated target. Mortality in field cages was assessed at 24 and 48 h. The 24-h mortality rate in mosquitoes exposed to the control target was 31.2%, whereas that in those exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target was 54.3%. The 48-h mortality rate was also elevated in mosquitoes exposed to the deltamethrin-treated target, but this result did not differ significantly from that observed in mosquitoes exposed to the control target. The significant suppression of female S. polynesiensis by deltamethrin-treated resting targets in this study indicates that these targets could play a role in the control of an important disease vector in the South Pacific region.

  • comparison of the centers for disease control and prevention backpack and insectazooka aspirators for sampling Aedes polynesiensis in french polynesia
    Journal of The American Mosquito Control Association, 2014
    Co-Authors: Limb K Hapairai, Michel Cheong A Sang, Herve C Bossin
    Abstract:

    Abstract The efficiency of the recently developed handheld InsectaZooka™ (IZ) aspirator was compared to that of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Backpack (CDC-BP) aspirator by conducting human bait collections on 2 islets (locally called motus) of the atoll of Tetiaroa, French Polynesia. Abundance of mosquitoes was compared between the wind-exposed and wind-protected sides of each motu to measure the effect of wind on mosquito distribution. The number of host-seeking Aedes polynesiensis mosquitoes collected on the 2 motus with either sampling device was not significantly different. Collection of male mosquitoes was low irrespective of the type of aspirator used. Wind had an effect on mosquito distribution, as females were more abundant on the protected sides of both motus. The IZ aspirator is a lighter and equally efficient alternative to the CDC-BP aspirator for collecting Ae. polynesiensis.

Corey L Brelsfoard – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Interspecific Hybridization Yields Strategy for South Pacific Filariasis Vector Elimination
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Corey L Brelsfoard, Yves Sechan, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    Background: Lymphatic filafilariasis (LF) is a leading cause of disability in South Pacific regions, where.96 % of the 1.7 million population are at risk of LF infection. As part of current global campaign, mass drug administration (MDA) has effectively reduced lymphatic filiariasis prevalence, but mosquito vector biology can complicate the MDA strategy. In some regions, there is evidence that the goal of LF elimination cannot be attained via MDA alone. Obligate vector mosquitoes provide additional targets for breaking the LF transmission cycle, but existing methods are ineffective for controlling the primary vector throughout much of the South Pacific, Aedes polynesiensis. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we demonstrate that interspecific hybrhybridization and introgression results in an A. polynesiensis strain (‘CP ’ strain) that is stably infected with the endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria from Aedes riversi. The CP strain is bi-directionally incompatible with naturally infected mosquitoes, resulting in female stersterility. Laboratory assays demonstrate that CP males are equally competitive, resulting in population elimination when CP males are introduced into wild type A. polynesiensis populations. Conclusions/Significance: The findings demonstrate strategy feasibility and encourage field tests of the vector eliminatio

  • Population genetic structure of Aedes polynesiensis in the Society Islands of French Polynesia: implications for control using a Wolbachia-based autocidal strategy.
    Parasites & vectors, 2012
    Co-Authors: Corey L Brelsfoard, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    Aedes polynesiensis is the primary vector of Wuchereria bancrofti in the South Pacific and an important vector of dengue virus. An improved understanding of the mosquito population genetics is needed for insight into the population dynamics and dispersal, which can aid in understanding the epidemiology of disease transmission and control of the vector. In light of the potential release of a Wolbachia infected strain for vector control, our objectives were to investigate the microgeographical and temporal population genetic structure of A. polynesiensis within the Society Islands of French Polynesia, and to compare the genetic background of a laboratory strain intended for release into its population of origin. A panel of eight microsatellite loci were used to genotype A. polynesiensis samples collected in French Polynesia from 2005-2008 and introgressed A. polynesiensis and Aedes riversi laboratory strains. Examination of genetic differentiation was performed using F-statistics, STRUCTURE, and an AMOVA. BAYESASS was used to estimate direction and rates of mosquito movement. FST values, AMOVA, and STRUCTURE analyses suggest low levels of intra-island differentiation from multiple collection sites on Tahiti, Raiatea, and Maupiti. Significant pair-wise FST values translate to relatively minor levels of inter-island genetic differentiation between more isolated islands and little differentiation between islands with greater commercial traffic (i.e., Tahiti, Raiatea, and Moorea). STRUCTURE analyses also indicate two population groups across the Society Islands, and the genetic makeup of Wolbachia infected strains intended for release is similar to that of wild-type populations from its island of origin, and unlike that of A. riversi. The observed panmictic population on Tahiti, Raiatea, and Moorea is consistent with hypothesized gene flow occurring between islands that have relatively high levels of air and maritime traffic, compared to that of the more isolated Maupiti and Tahaa. Gene flow and potential mosquito movement is discussed in relation to trials of applied autocidal strategies.

  • Population genetic structure of Aedes polynesiensis in the Society Islands of French Polynesia: implications for control using a Wolbachia- based autocidal strategy
    Parasites & Vectors, 2012
    Co-Authors: Corey L Brelsfoard, Stephen L Dobson
    Abstract:

    Background Aedes polynesiensis is the primary vector of Wuchereria bancrofti in the South Pacific and an important vector of dengue virus. An improved understanding of the mosquito population genetics is needed for insight into the population dynamics and dispersal, which can aid in understanding the epidemiology of disease transmission and control of the vector. In light of the potential release of a Wolbachia infected strain for vector control, our objectives were to investigate the microgeographical and temporal population genetic structure of A. polynesiensis within the Society Islands of French Polynesia, and to compare the genetic background of a laboratory strain intended for release into its population of origin. Methods A panel of eight microsatellite loci were used to genotype A. polynesiensis samples collected in French Polynesia from 2005-2008 and introgressed A. polynesiensis and Aedes riversi laboratory strains. Examination of genetic differentiation was performed using F -statistics, STRUCTURE, and an AMOVA. BAYESASS was used to estimate direction and rates of mosquito movement. Results F _ST values, AMOVA, and STRUCTURE analyses suggest low levels of intra-island differentiation from multiple collection sites on Tahiti, Raiatea, and Maupiti. Significant pair-wise F _ST values translate to relatively minor levels of inter-island genetic differentiation between more isolated islands and little differentiation between islands with greater commercial traffic (i.e., Tahiti, Raiatea, and Moorea). STRUCTURE analyses also indicate two population groups across the Society Islands, and the genetic makeup of Wolbachia infected strains intended for release is similar to that of wild-type populations from its island of origin, and unlike that of A. riversi . Conclusions The observed panmictic population on Tahiti, Raiatea, and Moorea is consistent with hypothesized gene flow occurring between islands that have relatively high levels of air and maritime traffic, compared to that of the more isolated Maupiti and Tahaa. Gene flow and potential mosquito movement is discussed in relation to trials of applied autocidal strategies.