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Affective Dimension

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Bernhard Dahme – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The impact of emotions on the sensory and Affective Dimension of perceived dyspnea
    Psychophysiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Andreas Von Leupoldt, Corinna Mertz, Sarah Kegat, Swantje Burmester, Bernhard Dahme
    Abstract:

    Dyspnea is an impairing symptom in various diseases. Recent research has shown that the perception of dyspnea, like pain, consists of a sensory (intensity) and an Affective (unpleasantness) Dimension, but little is known about the specific impact of different emotions on these distinct Dimensions. We therefore examined the impact of viewing Affective picture series of positive, neutral, and negative valence on perceived dyspnea during resistive load breathing in healthy volunteers. Inspiratory time (Ti), breathing frequency (f), and oscillatory resistance (Ros) remained unchanged across conditions. Ratings for unpleasantness of dyspnea increased from positive to neutral to negative series, but ratings for intensity of dyspnea showed no changes. The results suggest that the Affective Dimension of the perception of dyspnea is particularly vulnerable to emotional influences, irrespective of objective lung function.

  • differentiation between the sensory and Affective Dimension of dyspnea during resistive load breathing in normal subjects
    Chest, 2005
    Co-Authors: Andreas Von Leupoldt, Bernhard Dahme
    Abstract:

    Study objective: Dyspnea is the uncomfortable sensation of breathing and is an impairing symptom in a variety of diseases. Like pain, it motivates adaptive behavior to regain homeostasis, and both sensations share various characteristics. Whereas the realization of the multiDimensionality of pain was a key contribution to pain research, little is known about a similar multiDimensionality in the perception of dyspnea. The present study examined whether sensory and Affective aspects of induced dyspnea can be differentiated. Design: A controlled laboratory study. Setting: Psychophysiologic laboratory of the Psychological Institute III, University of Hamburg, Germany. Participants: Ten healthy volunteers aged 24 to 52 years (mean, 35 years). Interventions: Dyspnea was induced by breathing through inspiratory resistive loads of increasing magnitude (0.99 to 2.33 kPa/L/s), alternating with episodes of unloaded breathing. Inspiratory time (T i ) and breathing frequency ( f ) were continuously monitored. The experienced intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea were rated after each episode on separate visual analog scales (VASs), which were presented in permuted order. Intraindividual linear regression slopes were calculated separately for both Dimensions and compared. Measurements and results: Breathing through inspiratory resistive loads resulted in increases of VAS ratings for intensity and unpleasantness paralleled by increases in T i and decreases in f (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003, respectively). The mean regression slope for perceived unpleasantness was higher than for perceived intensity (mean ± SD, 2.83 ± 1.28 and 2.11 ± 1.74, respectively; p = 0.032), indicating stronger increases of unpleasantness with increasing magnitude of resistive loads. Conclusions: The results show that the sensory and Affective Dimension of experimentally induced dyspnea can be differentiated in healthy volunteers. The obtained multiDimensionality of dyspnea converges with previous reports on similarities between dyspnea and pain. Implications for future studies on the perception of dyspnea are provided.

Golan Shahar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • psychology psychiatry brain neuroscience section original research article pain specialists evaluation of patient s prognosis during the first visit predicts subsequent depression and the Affective Dimension of pain
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Zvia Rudich, Sheera F. Lerman, Boris Gurevich, Golan Shahar
    Abstract:

    Objective. To examine the predictive value of phy- sician’s prognosis after patient’s first visit to a pain specialty clinic. Design. This is a prospective-longitudinal study in which patients completed questionnaires regarding their pain and psychological constructs before their first visit to a pain specialist and again after an average of 5 months. Physicians rated patient’s prognosis immediately after the first visit. Setting. This study was conducted at the outpatient specialty pain clinic at Soroka University Medical Center. Patients. Forty-five chronic pain patients suffering from a range of nonmalignant pain conditions. Outcome Measures. Sensory and Affective pain measured by the Short-Form McGill Pain Question- naire and depressive symptoms measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Results. Multiple regression analysis revealed that physician’s rating of patient prognosis at Time 1 uniquely predicted subsequent depressive symp- toms and Affective pain but not sensory pain at Time 2 even after controlling for Time 1 levels of these variables. Conclusion. Physician’s pessimistic evaluation of patient’s prognosis after the first visit was longitu- dinally associated with an increase in depression and in the Affective Dimension of pain over time, but not with changes in the sensory component of pain. Referring to physician pessimism as a marker for pre-depressed patient may lead to early preventive interventions.

  • PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY & BRAIN NEUROSCIENCE SECTION Original Research Article Pain Specialists’ Evaluation of Patient’s Prognosis During the First Visit Predicts Subsequent Depression and the Affective Dimension of Pain
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Zvia Rudich, Sheera F. Lerman, Boris Gurevich, Golan Shahar
    Abstract:

    Objective. To examine the predictive value of phy- sician’s prognosis after patient’s first visit to a pain specialty clinic. Design. This is a prospective-longitudinal study in which patients completed questionnaires regarding their pain and psychological constructs before their first visit to a pain specialist and again after an average of 5 months. Physicians rated patient’s prognosis immediately after the first visit. Setting. This study was conducted at the outpatient specialty pain clinic at Soroka University Medical Center. Patients. Forty-five chronic pain patients suffering from a range of nonmalignant pain conditions. Outcome Measures. Sensory and Affective pain measured by the Short-Form McGill Pain Question- naire and depressive symptoms measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Results. Multiple regression analysis revealed that physician’s rating of patient prognosis at Time 1 uniquely predicted subsequent depressive symp- toms and Affective pain but not sensory pain at Time 2 even after controlling for Time 1 levels of these variables. Conclusion. Physician’s pessimistic evaluation of patient’s prognosis after the first visit was longitu- dinally associated with an increase in depression and in the Affective Dimension of pain over time, but not with changes in the sensory component of pain. Referring to physician pessimism as a marker for pre-depressed patient may lead to early preventive interventions.

  • Pain Specialists’ Evaluation of Patient’s Prognosis During the First Visit Predicts Subsequent Depression and the Affective Dimension of Pain
    Pain medicine (Malden Mass.), 2010
    Co-Authors: Zvia Rudich, Sheera F. Lerman, Boris Gurevich, Golan Shahar
    Abstract:

    Objective.  To examine the predictive value of physician’s prognosis after patient’s first visit to a pain specialty clinic. Design.  This is a prospective-longitudinal study in which patients completed questionnaires regarding their pain and psychological constructs before their first visit to a pain specialist and again after an average of 5 months. Physicians rated patient’s prognosis immediately after the first visit. Setting.  This study was conducted at the outpatient specialty pain clinic at Soroka University Medical Center. Patients.  Forty-five chronic pain patients suffering from a range of nonmalignant pain conditions. Outcome Measures.  Sensory and Affective pain measured by the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and depressive symptoms measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Results.  Multiple regression analysis revealed that physician’s rating of patient prognosis at Time 1 uniquely predicted subsequent depressive symptoms and Affective pain but not sensory pain at Time 2 even after controlling for Time 1 levels of these variables. Conclusion.  Physician’s pessimistic evaluation of patient’s prognosis after the first visit was longitudinally associated with an increase in depression and in the Affective Dimension of pain over time, but not with changes in the sensory component of pain. Referring to physician pessimism as a marker for pre-depressed patient may lead to early preventive interventions.

Robert W. Lansing – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the Affective Dimension of laboratory dyspnea air hunger is more unpleasant than work effort
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Robert B. Banzett, Sarah Pedersen, Richard M. Schwartzstein, Robert W. Lansing
    Abstract:

    Rationale: It is hypothesized that the Affective Dimension of dyspnea (unpleasantness, emotional response) is not strictly dependent on the intensity of dyspnea.Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the ratio of immediate unpleasantness (A1) to sensory intensity (SI) varies depending on the type of dyspnea.Methods: Twelve healthy subjects experienced three stimuli: stimulus 1: maximal eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea against inspiratory resistance, requiring 15 times the work of resting breathing; stimulus 2: PetCO2 6.1 mm Hg above resting with ventilation restricted to less than spontaneous breathing; stimulus 3: PetCO2 7.7 mm Hg above resting with ventilation further restricted. After each trial, subjects rated SI, A1, and qualities of dyspnea on the MultiDimensional Dyspnea Profile (MDP), a comprehensive instrument tested here for the first time.Measurements and Main Results: Stimulus 1 was always limited by subjects failing to meet a higher ventilation target; none signaled severe discomfort. This evo…

  • The Affective Dimension of laboratory dyspnea: air hunger is more unpleasant than work/effort.
    American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Robert B. Banzett, Sarah Pedersen, Richard M. Schwartzstein, Robert W. Lansing
    Abstract:

    Rationale: It is hypothesized that the Affective Dimension of dyspnea (unpleasantness, emotional response) is not strictly dependent on the intensity of dyspnea.Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the ratio of immediate unpleasantness (A1) to sensory intensity (SI) varies depending on the type of dyspnea.Methods: Twelve healthy subjects experienced three stimuli: stimulus 1: maximal eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea against inspiratory resistance, requiring 15 times the work of resting breathing; stimulus 2: PetCO2 6.1 mm Hg above resting with ventilation restricted to less than spontaneous breathing; stimulus 3: PetCO2 7.7 mm Hg above resting with ventilation further restricted. After each trial, subjects rated SI, A1, and qualities of dyspnea on the MultiDimensional Dyspnea Profile (MDP), a comprehensive instrument tested here for the first time.Measurements and Main Results: Stimulus 1 was always limited by subjects failing to meet a higher ventilation target; none signaled severe discomfort. This evo…

Patrick M. Dougherty – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The sensory-limbic model of pain memory: Connections from thalamus to the limbic system mediate the learned component of the Affective Dimension of pain
    Pain Forum, 1997
    Co-Authors: K. L. Casey, J. Ledoux, M. Gabriel, Frederick Lenz, R. H. Gracely, A. T. Zirh, A. J. Romanoski, Peter S. Staats, Patrick M. Dougherty
    Abstract:

    Stimulation in the human somatosensory thalamus, posteroinferior to the human principal sensory nucleus (ventralis caudalis), has been reported to reproduce previously experienced pain associated with a strong Affective Dimension. In these reports, pains with a strong Affective Dimension were reproduced by stimulation within and posteroinferior to the core (posteroinferior region) of the ventralis caudalis only in patients with previous experience of such pain. Similar vivid experiential responses have been reported with stimulation over the parasylvian cortex. Thus, the connection from the posteroinferior region to the secondary somatosensory cortex and insular cortex may explain the reproduction, by thalamic stimulation, of pain with a strong Affective Dimension. The secondary somatosensory and insular cortex are involved in nociceptive pathways that have similar characteristics to cortical areas known to be involved in visual memory through corticolimbic connections. Therefore, stimulation-evoked pain with a strong Affective Dimension may be explained by a model in which limbic structures are altered by previous experience of pain with a strong Affective Dimension and triggered, through thalamic corticolimbic connections, to reproduce that pain. This sensorylimbic model could form the framework for testable hypotheses regarding the anatomic and physiologic substrates of learning processes involved in the Affective Dimension of pain.

  • The sensory-limbic model suggests testable hypotheses about the learned component of the Affective Dimension of pain
    Pain Forum, 1997
    Co-Authors: Frederick Lenz, R. H. Gracely, A. T. Zirh, A. J. Romanoski, Peter S. Staats, Patrick M. Dougherty
    Abstract:

    C asey is correct in stating that the thalamic data cannot support or challenge the hypotheses that “limbic structures are conditioned by previous experience of pain with a strong Affective Dimension” or that “thalamic corticolimbic” activation of these conditioned limbic circuits will reproduce this pain. The hypotheses are supported by connections between the area of the thalamus in which stimulation reproduced pain with a strong Affective Dimension and the parasylvian area of the cortex and amygdala in which stimulation can evoke sensory experiences along with emotions accompanying the original experience [5,24]. These cortically evoked sensory experiences did not include pain, although the exact structures implicated in nociceptive processing may not have been stimulated. This cortical connectivity is congruent with Mishkin’s model of somatosensory memory mediated through connections from the parasylvian cortex to the amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus (reference 20 and Figure 1 of the Focus article). Gloor has reported that stimulation of the amygdala evoked reproduction of sensory experiences, including their emotional tone [5]. The thalamic data are consistent with evidence that the posteroinferior region projects to the parasylvian cortex (see the discussion of anatomic connections in the

  • Stimulation in the human somatosensory thalamus can reproduce both the Affective and sensory Dimensions of previously experienced pain.
    Nature medicine, 1995
    Co-Authors: F. A. Lenz, A. J. Romanoski, Richard H. Gracely, Earl J. Hope, L. H. Rowland, Patrick M. Dougherty
    Abstract:

    Thalamic structures involved in the unpleasant emotional or Affective aspect of pain are poorly understood. We now describe studies of the region of the thalamic principal somatosensory nucleus (Vc) performed before thalamotomy for tremor in a patient who also had panic disorder. Microstimulation in the region posterior to Vc evoked chest pain, including a strong Affective Dimension, almost identical to that occurring during his panic attacks, as measured using a questionnaire. Results in our other patients indicate that stimulation–associated pain with a strong Affective Dimension occurred only in those patients who had previously experienced spontaneous pain with a strong Affective component. These results are consistent with stimulation–evoked activation of limbic structures, which are connected through cortex with the region posterior to Vc and involved in the Affective Dimension of pain through conditioning by previous experience.

Andreas Von Leupoldt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The impact of emotions on the sensory and Affective Dimension of perceived dyspnea
    Psychophysiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Andreas Von Leupoldt, Corinna Mertz, Sarah Kegat, Swantje Burmester, Bernhard Dahme
    Abstract:

    Dyspnea is an impairing symptom in various diseases. Recent research has shown that the perception of dyspnea, like pain, consists of a sensory (intensity) and an Affective (unpleasantness) Dimension, but little is known about the specific impact of different emotions on these distinct Dimensions. We therefore examined the impact of viewing Affective picture series of positive, neutral, and negative valence on perceived dyspnea during resistive load breathing in healthy volunteers. Inspiratory time (Ti), breathing frequency (f), and oscillatory resistance (Ros) remained unchanged across conditions. Ratings for unpleasantness of dyspnea increased from positive to neutral to negative series, but ratings for intensity of dyspnea showed no changes. The results suggest that the Affective Dimension of the perception of dyspnea is particularly vulnerable to emotional influences, irrespective of objective lung function.

  • differentiation between the sensory and Affective Dimension of dyspnea during resistive load breathing in normal subjects
    Chest, 2005
    Co-Authors: Andreas Von Leupoldt, Bernhard Dahme
    Abstract:

    Study objective: Dyspnea is the uncomfortable sensation of breathing and is an impairing symptom in a variety of diseases. Like pain, it motivates adaptive behavior to regain homeostasis, and both sensations share various characteristics. Whereas the realization of the multiDimensionality of pain was a key contribution to pain research, little is known about a similar multiDimensionality in the perception of dyspnea. The present study examined whether sensory and Affective aspects of induced dyspnea can be differentiated. Design: A controlled laboratory study. Setting: Psychophysiologic laboratory of the Psychological Institute III, University of Hamburg, Germany. Participants: Ten healthy volunteers aged 24 to 52 years (mean, 35 years). Interventions: Dyspnea was induced by breathing through inspiratory resistive loads of increasing magnitude (0.99 to 2.33 kPa/L/s), alternating with episodes of unloaded breathing. Inspiratory time (T i ) and breathing frequency ( f ) were continuously monitored. The experienced intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea were rated after each episode on separate visual analog scales (VASs), which were presented in permuted order. Intraindividual linear regression slopes were calculated separately for both Dimensions and compared. Measurements and results: Breathing through inspiratory resistive loads resulted in increases of VAS ratings for intensity and unpleasantness paralleled by increases in T i and decreases in f (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003, respectively). The mean regression slope for perceived unpleasantness was higher than for perceived intensity (mean ± SD, 2.83 ± 1.28 and 2.11 ± 1.74, respectively; p = 0.032), indicating stronger increases of unpleasantness with increasing magnitude of resistive loads. Conclusions: The results show that the sensory and Affective Dimension of experimentally induced dyspnea can be differentiated in healthy volunteers. The obtained multiDimensionality of dyspnea converges with previous reports on similarities between dyspnea and pain. Implications for future studies on the perception of dyspnea are provided.