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Edson Marchiori – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases Causing the Air Crescent Sign: A State-of-the-Art Review
    Lung, 2018
    Co-Authors: Joyce Betta Sevilha, Miriam Menna Barreto, Gláucia Zanetti, Rosana Souza Rodrigues, Bruno Hochhegger, Edson Marchiori

    Abstract:

    Aspergilloma, also known as mycetoma or fungus ball, is characterized by a round or oval mass with soft-tissue attenuation within a preexisting lung cavity. The typical computed tomography (CT) aspect of an aspergilloma is a mass separated from the wall of the cavity by an Airspace of variable size and shape, resulting in the Air Crescent Sign, also known as the meniscus Sign. This CT feature is non-specific and can be simulated by several other entities that result in intracavitary masses. This review describes the main clinical and imaging aspects of the infectious and non-infectious diseases that may present with fungus-ball appearance, including pulmonary hydatid cyst, Rasmussen aneurysm, pulmonary gangrene, intracavitary clot, textiloma, lung cancer, metastasis, and teratoma, focusing on the differential diagnosis.

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  • Original Article COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ANGIOINVASIVE PULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA*
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Radiol Bras, Edson Marchiori, Renata Carneiro Leão, Rosana Rodrigues, Arthur Soares, Emerson L. Gasparetto, Dante L. Escuissato

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the main findings of computed tomography in patients presenting acute leukemia complicated by angioinvasive aspergillosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Com-puted tomography images of 19 patients were retrospectively studied for the presence of consolidations, nodules and masses, with or without presentation of halo Sign, cavitation and Air Crescent Sign. RESULTS: Consolidation was the most frequent finding, occurring in 12 of the 19 cases, most of them presenting the halo Sign; cavitation was found in 5 of 12 cases, one of them with Air Crescent Sign. Nodules and masses occurred respectively in six and four cases, most of them with halo Sign. Cavitation was found in only one case of mass. Other findings observed were: crazy-paving pattern (two cases), patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation opacity (three cases) and pleural involvement (seven cases) under the form of effusion or thick-ening. CONCLUSION: Areas of consolidation, mass or nodule, even a solitary one, presenting halo Sign on CT images evaluated in an appropriate clinical context are highly suggestive of angioinvasive aspergillosis

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  • Correspondence
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Edson Marchiori, Gláucia Zanetti, Miriam Menna Barreto

    Abstract:

    Teratoma: another cause of the Air Crescent Sign We read with great interest the well-written article by Tseng and Chen,1 who described the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis and a cavitary lesion in the right lung with an Air Crescent Sign and an intracavitary fungus ball-like mass. The final diagnosis was lung carcinoma. The authors highlighted the importance of cavity wall thickness for the differential diagnosis, reporting that cavity lung cancer rarely presents with a thin-walled cavity. We would like to report the case of a 22-year-old woman who also presented with hemoptysis and a thick-walled cavitary lesion on chest X-ray

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Takuma Tajiri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • lung metastasis of transitional cell cancer of the urothelium with fungus ball like shadows closely resembling aspergilloma a case report and review of the literature
    Oncology Letters, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hidehiro Watanabe, Tomonori Uruma, Tokuro Tsunoda, Gen Tazaki, Atsushi Suga, Yusuke Nakamura, Shunsuke Yamada, Takuma Tajiri

    Abstract:

    The present study reports the case of a 67-year-old female patient who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary aspergilloma. This diagnosis was based on a chest computed tomography (CT) scan showing a cavitary lesion of 3.5 cm in diameter, with fungus ball-like shadows inside, and an Air Crescent Sign in the right upper lung. At 63 years old, the patient was treated for transitional cell cancer of the urothelium (non-invasive, pT1N0M0) by total cystectomy, ileal conduit diversion and urostomy. For 4 years post-operatively, the patient was healthy and had no clinical symptoms, and the Air Crescent Sign was not identified by chest CT until the patient had reached 67 years of age. However, a final diagnosis of lung metastasis of transitional cell cancer of the urothelium was histopathologically identified subsequent to video-assisted thoracic surgery. Although it is rare that transitional cell cancer moves to the lung and makes a cavitary lesion, a differential diagnosis of cancer is necessary, even when examining infected patients with Air Crescent Signs that are characteristic of aspergilloma. The physician must be mindful of metastatic pulmonary tumors that closely resemble aspergillomas, not only in infectious diseases, but also in oncological practice. Primary surgical removal should be considered.

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  • Lung metastasis of transitional cell cancer of the urothelium, with fungus ball‑like shadows closely resembling aspergilloma: A case report and review of the literature
    Oncology Letters, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hidehiro Watanabe, Tomonori Uruma, Tokuro Tsunoda, Atsushi Suga, Yusuke Nakamura, Shunsuke Yamada, Tazaki, Takuma Tajiri

    Abstract:

    The present study reports the case of a 67-year-old female patient who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary aspergilloma. This diagnosis was based on a chest computed tomography (CT) scan showing a cavitary lesion of 3.5 cm in diameter, with fungus ball-like shadows inside, and an Air Crescent Sign in the right upper lung. At 63 years old, the patient was treated for transitional cell cancer of the urothelium (non-invasive, pT1N0M0) by total cystectomy, ileal conduit diversion and urostomy. For 4 years post-operatively, the patient was healthy and had no clinical symptoms, and the Air Crescent Sign was not identified by chest CT until the patient had reached 67 years of age. However, a final diagnosis of lung metastasis of transitional cell cancer of the urothelium was histopathologically identified subsequent to video-assisted thoracic surgery. Although it is rare that transitional cell cancer moves to the lung and makes a cavitary lesion, a differential diagnosis of cancer is necessary, even when examining infected patients with Air Crescent Signs that are characteristic of aspergilloma. The physician must be mindful of metastatic pulmonary tumors that closely resemble aspergillomas, not only in infectious diseases, but also in oncological practice. Primary surgical removal should be considered.

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Miriam Menna Barreto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases Causing the Air Crescent Sign: A State-of-the-Art Review
    Lung, 2018
    Co-Authors: Joyce Betta Sevilha, Miriam Menna Barreto, Gláucia Zanetti, Rosana Souza Rodrigues, Bruno Hochhegger, Edson Marchiori

    Abstract:

    Aspergilloma, also known as mycetoma or fungus ball, is characterized by a round or oval mass with soft-tissue attenuation within a preexisting lung cavity. The typical computed tomography (CT) aspect of an aspergilloma is a mass separated from the wall of the cavity by an Airspace of variable size and shape, resulting in the Air Crescent Sign, also known as the meniscus Sign. This CT feature is non-specific and can be simulated by several other entities that result in intracavitary masses. This review describes the main clinical and imaging aspects of the infectious and non-infectious diseases that may present with fungus-ball appearance, including pulmonary hydatid cyst, Rasmussen aneurysm, pulmonary gangrene, intracavitary clot, textiloma, lung cancer, metastasis, and teratoma, focusing on the differential diagnosis.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Correspondence
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Edson Marchiori, Gláucia Zanetti, Miriam Menna Barreto

    Abstract:

    Teratoma: another cause of the Air Crescent Sign We read with great interest the well-written article by Tseng and Chen,1 who described the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis and a cavitary lesion in the right lung with an Air Crescent Sign and an intracavitary fungus ball-like mass. The final diagnosis was lung carcinoma. The authors highlighted the importance of cavity wall thickness for the differential diagnosis, reporting that cavity lung cancer rarely presents with a thin-walled cavity. We would like to report the case of a 22-year-old woman who also presented with hemoptysis and a thick-walled cavitary lesion on chest X-ray

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  • Teratoma: another cause of the Air Crescent Sign
    QJM, 2015
    Co-Authors: Edson Marchiori, Gláucia Zanetti, Miriam Menna Barreto

    Abstract:

    We read with great interest the well-written article by Tseng and Chen,1 who described the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis and a cavitary lesion in the right lung with an Air Crescent Sign and an intracavitary fungus ball-like mass. The final diagnosis was lung carcinoma. The authors highlighted the importance of cavity wall thickness for the differential …

    Free Register to Access Article