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Alchemilla

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V K Voinikov – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • chromatographic study of phenolic compounds in medicinal plants Alchemilla subcrenata buser and veronica chamaedrys l
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    The objects of investigation were leaves and inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata and Veronica chamaedry, growing on the left bank at 700 m from the edge of Lake Baikal. Some small differences in the quantity and quality of phenolic compounds in the leaves of one species even selected at one time were found. At the same time, differences in the quantity and quality of phenolic compounds in the different times of the day were even more pronounced. In the inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata the dynamics of flavonoids has been characterized by more stable composition than in its leaves. For Veronica’s tissues and organs more variety of seasonal cocktail of phenolic compounds than in the Alchemilla subcrenata was detected. Expect a variety of phenolic compounds in inflorescences of Veronica seasonal cocktail was higher than in the leaves.

  • dynamics of vitamins and phenols of Alchemilla subcrenata by diurnal variation of temperature in october
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, E G Rudikovskaya, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    Round-the-clock dynamics of phenols and vitamins В6, С, РР in the leaves of Alchemilla subcrenata with a glance of thermal change was shown. The maximum of content of phenols and vitamin С was observed at 6 a.m. Dynamics of vitamins В6 and PP, actively participating in the exchange of proteins and amino acids, also is subject to fluctuation during the day. More higher content of these coenzymes are the coolest time of the day. To confirm the possible involvement of vitamins В6 and PP in the biosynthesis of proteins were examined stress proteins in leaves of Alchemilla subcrenata during those same days. Heat-shock protein HSP 17.6 was detected only a day at its maximum daily temperatures and сold regulated protein COR14b was detected in the morning, when the temperature was minimal.

  • the daily dynamics of phenolic compounds content and guaiacol peroksidase activity in leaves and flowers of Alchemilla subcrenata and veronica chamaedrys
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2015
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, E G Rudikovskaya, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    The daily dynamics of peroxidase activity and the total content of phenolic compounds in leaves and inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata Buser and Veronica chamaedrys L. were studied. Significant changes in the content of phenolic compounds and activity peroksidase depending on the time of day was shown.

M A Zhivetev – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • chromatographic study of phenolic compounds in medicinal plants Alchemilla subcrenata buser and veronica chamaedrys l
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    The objects of investigation were leaves and inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata and Veronica chamaedry, growing on the left bank at 700 m from the edge of Lake Baikal. Some small differences in the quantity and quality of phenolic compounds in the leaves of one species even selected at one time were found. At the same time, differences in the quantity and quality of phenolic compounds in the different times of the day were even more pronounced. In the inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata the dynamics of flavonoids has been characterized by more stable composition than in its leaves. For Veronica’s tissues and organs more variety of seasonal cocktail of phenolic compounds than in the Alchemilla subcrenata was detected. Expect a variety of phenolic compounds in inflorescences of Veronica seasonal cocktail was higher than in the leaves.

  • dynamics of vitamins and phenols of Alchemilla subcrenata by diurnal variation of temperature in october
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, E G Rudikovskaya, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    Round-the-clock dynamics of phenols and vitamins В6, С, РР in the leaves of Alchemilla subcrenata with a glance of thermal change was shown. The maximum of content of phenols and vitamin С was observed at 6 a.m. Dynamics of vitamins В6 and PP, actively participating in the exchange of proteins and amino acids, also is subject to fluctuation during the day. More higher content of these coenzymes are the coolest time of the day. To confirm the possible involvement of vitamins В6 and PP in the biosynthesis of proteins were examined stress proteins in leaves of Alchemilla subcrenata during those same days. Heat-shock protein HSP 17.6 was detected only a day at its maximum daily temperatures and сold regulated protein COR14b was detected in the morning, when the temperature was minimal.

  • the daily dynamics of phenolic compounds content and guaiacol peroksidase activity in leaves and flowers of Alchemilla subcrenata and veronica chamaedrys
    Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry, 2015
    Co-Authors: M A Zhivetev, L V Dudareva, I A Graskova, E G Rudikovskaya, V K Voinikov

    Abstract:

    The daily dynamics of peroxidase activity and the total content of phenolic compounds in leaves and inflorescences of Alchemilla subcrenata Buser and Veronica chamaedrys L. were studied. Significant changes in the content of phenolic compounds and activity peroksidase depending on the time of day was shown.

Berit Gehrke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • analysis of paralogs in target enrichment data pinpoints multiple ancient polyploidy events in Alchemilla s l rosaceae
    bioRxiv, 2020
    Co-Authors: Diego F Moralesbriones, Berit Gehrke, Chienhsun Huang, Aaron Liston, Hannah E Marx, David C Tank, Ya Yang

    Abstract:

    Target enrichment is becoming increasingly popular for phylogenomic studies. Although baits for enrichment are typically designed to target single-copy genes, paralogs are often recovered with increased sequencing depth, sometimes from a significant proportion of loci. Common approaches for processing paralogs in target enrichment datasets include removal, random selection, and manual pruning of loci that show evidence of paralogy. These approaches can introduce errors in orthology inference, and sometimes significantly reduce the number of loci, especially in groups experiencing whole-genome duplication (WGD) events. Here we used an automated approach for paralog processing in a target enrichment dataset of 68 species of Alchemilla s.l. (Rosaceae), a widely distributed clade of plants primarily from temperate climate regions. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies and chromosome numbers both suggested the polyploid origin of the group. However, putative parental lineages remain unknown. By taking paralogs into consideration, we identified four nodes in the backbone of Alchemilla s.l. with an elevated proportion of gene duplication. Furthermore, using a gene-tree reconciliation approach we established the autopolyploidy origin of the entire Alchemilla s.l. and the nested allopolyploidy origin of four clades within the group. Here we showed the utility of automated orthology methods, commonly used in genomic or transcriptomic datasets, to study complex scenarios of polyploidy and reticulate evolution from target enrichment datasets.

  • the evolution of dwarf shrubs in alpine environments a case study of Alchemilla in africa
    Annals of Botany, 2016
    Co-Authors: Berit Gehrke, Michael D Pirie, Martha Kandziora

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Alpine and arctic environments worldwide, including high mountains, are dominated by short-stature woody plants (dwarf shrubs). This conspicuous life form asserts considerable influence on local environmental conditions above the treeline, creating its own microhabitat. This study reconstructs the evolution of dwarf shrubs in Alchemilla in the African tropical alpine environment, where they represent one of the largest clades and are among the most common and abundant plants. METHODS: Different phylogenetic inference methods were used with plastid and nuclear DNA sequence markers, molecular dating (BEAST and RelTime), analyses of diversification rate shifts (MEDUSA and BAMM) and ancestral character and area reconstructions (Mesquite). KEY RESULTS: It is inferred that African Alchemilla species originated following long-distance dispersal to tropical East Africa, but that the evolution of dwarf shrubs occurred in Ethiopia and in tropical East Africa independently. Establishing a timeframe is challenging given inconsistencies in age estimates, but it seems likely that they originated in the Pleistocene, or at the earliest in the late Miocene. The adaptation to alpine-like environments in the form of dwarf shrubs has apparently not led to enhanced diversification rates. Ancestral reconstructions indicate reversals in Alchemilla from plants with a woody base to entirely herbaceous forms, a transition that is rarely reported in angiosperms. CONCLUSIONS: Alchemilla is a clear example of in situ tropical alpine speciation. The dwarf shrub life form typical of African Alchemilla has evolved twice independently, further indicating its selective advantage in these harsh environments. However, it has not influenced diversification, which, although recent, was not rapid.

  • molecular phylogenetics of Alchemilla aphanes and lachemilla rosaceae inferred from plastid and nuclear intron and spacer dna sequences with comments on generic classification
    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 2008
    Co-Authors: Berit Gehrke, Christian Brauchler, Katia Romoleroux, Magnus Lundberg, Gunther Heubl, Torsten Eriksson

    Abstract:

    Alchemilla (the lady’s mantles) is a well known but inconspicuous group in the Rosaceae, notable for its ornamental leaves and pharmaceutical properties. The systematics of Alchemilla has remained …